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Washington College Policies

This page contains detailed policies relating to employee benefits, personnel policies, and employment rules that are in effect at Washington College.

Policies contain may summaries and general overviews; it is not all-inclusive. For more information about specific policies please contact the Office of Human Resources and/ or the contact person or department referenced in the policy text. 

Policies by Topic

 

The Human Resources staff is committed to providing you excellent service. There are a number of ways for you to contact us.

Our website, located at hr.washcoll.edu offers comprehensive information, forms and helpful links.

Our office has several units of service, each of administered by a Human Resources Staff Member. For a list of staff and areas of focus please visit Meet Our Team. Please let us know how we can help you.

Other helpful resources

Human Resources encourages you to visit the College’s website www.washcoll.edu to learn more about all aspects of the University.

The Title IX Coordinator oversees and administers the College’s affirmative action and equal opportunity programs, discrimination, sexual harrassment and policies.

The 504/ADA Coordinator oversees compliance with the Americans with Disability Act and related accommodations.

The Employee Assistance Program is a free and confidential service that assists employees with personal issues.

Washington College offers a comprehensive benefit package for full time and part time benefit eligible employees. 

For more information about Washington College Benefits please visit the Benefits page. 


Dispute Resolution

 

Washington College is committed to the highest ethical and professional standards of conduct as an integral part of its core values of critical thinking, effective communication, and moral courage. To achieve this goal, the College relies on each community member’s ethical behavior, civility, honesty, integrity and good judgment.

The Code of Conduct establishes guidelines for professional conduct by representatives of the College including 1) executive officers, Faculty, Staff and other employees of the College 2) consultants, vendors and contractors when doing business with the College and 3) volunteers. The Code refers to all these persons collectively as “members of the College community” or “community members.”

This Code cannot address all situations that may arise, but it offers a framework to assist community members in understanding the College’s expectations of them. This Code of Conduct supplements but does not supersede any other published College policies such as those contained in the Faculty Handbook and College Policies. Violations of the Code of Conduct may result in disciplinary or corrective action up to and including termination of employments, contractual services, or volunteer services, as applicable.

Respect for Persons

Washington College places a high value on human relations, human diversity and human rights. Consistent with these values, the College strives to maintain a work environment that is characterized by mutual respect for all individuals. Such an environment has no place for harassment or discrimination based on race, color, religion, national origin, age, sex, sexual orientation, disability, and other factors prohibited by law. Such behavior will not be tolerated. As befitting the College’s commitment to its mission, community members are expected to treat one another, students, and the general public in a cordial and respectful manner. For example, the following behaviors are specifically prohibited:

1. Disorderly conduct, including but not limited to using discriminatory, profane, abusive, or threatening language, fighting, provoking a fight, threatening or attempting bodily harm or injury to another on College property or during College activities; or other conduct which threatens or endangers the health, safety, or well-being of a community member, wherever it occurs.

2. Sexual harassment of employees, students, donors, customers, visitors, vendors or any other person on College property or during College activities.

3. Members must not abuse the authority they have been given and care must be taken to ensure that any personal relationships do not result in situations that might interfere with objective judgment. Members should conduct themselves in a businesslike manner on campus or when attending an off-campus work related function. Unprofessional activities such as threatening or intimidating behavior, offensive language, possessing or posting offensive materials in the work area or accessing inappropriate materials on computers are strictly prohibited.

Respect for Property

Members of the College community must be responsible stewards of the College’s resources. Consistent with this value, employees are expected to exercise reasonable care in the use of College property and to report any damage to College property to their supervisors and/or other appropriate College officials. The following activities are specifically prohibited:

1.  Willful or careless damage to College property.

2.  Theft or other dishonesty.

3. Tampering with or destroying College data, records, or other information without authorization; gaining unauthorized access to such information; disclosing confidential information; or otherwise misusing College data or information. Confidential information is defined in State and Federal law and College Policies.

4. Unauthorized use of College vehicles, mail services, identification and credit cards, telephones, computers, or computer equipment, or other College equipment or materials. Computers and computer accounts are provided to employees to assist them in the performance of their jobs. Employees do not have an expectation of privacy in anything they create, send or receive on the computer. The College may review, for business reasons, any and all aspects of any College computer system, including employee email.

5. Use of WC IT Resources is a privilege, not a right. The WC IT Resources may not be used in any manner prohibited by Federal, State or local law or disallowed by licenses, contracts, or College regulations.

Standards of Safety

The College is committed to maintaining the safety and security of all persons on College property and during College activities and to maintain a safe and healthful working environment. Specific prohibited activities include:

1. Possession of firearms, explosives, or other lethal materials on College property or during College activities. Exceptions to this standard must be approved in writing by the President and administered by Public Safety.

2. Possessing, drinking, or being under the influence of intoxicants on the job; unlawful possession, use or distribution of alcohol on College property or during College activities; illegally using, manufacturing, possessing, distributing, dispensing, or being under the influence of controlled substances on College property or during College activities. An exception to this is the consumption of alcohol in moderation at official College events in which alcohol is served. College events where alcohol is served must have servers who have received Training for Intervention Procedures (TIPS).

3. Refusal to obey security officials, Police Officers or Fire Officials, or other proper authorities in emergencies.

4. Failure to comply with safety rules, regulations or common safety practices.

5. Failure to report an accident involving on-the-job injury or damage to College property.

6. Smoking is prohibited in College buildings and outdoors within 25 feet of entrances and exits of campus buildings. Smoking is allowed in designated areas located around campus.

Compliance with Laws and College Policies

College community members are expected to follow normally accepted business and professional standards in matters of business and personal conduct and to exhibit personal and professional integrity and objectivity at all times. Faculty and Staff of the College are expected to take precautions to ensure that outside financial interests do not place them in conflict with carrying out their duties and responsibilities as employees of the College. Community members are expected to behave in a manner consistent with the accepted principles and values of Washington College. Specifically prohibited activities include but are not limited to:

1.  Falsification of College records.

2. Intentional misrepresentation or falsification of academic credentials or work experience, either written or orally.

3. Violation of Federal, State or local laws, regulations, or ordinances in connection with one’s work for the College.

4. Gambling for monetary gain on College property or during College activities. Charity events are specifically excluded from this standard.

5. Failure to observe campus traffic or parking regulations.

6. Soliciting, collecting money, or circulating petitions for personal gain on College property at any time without permission of the chief business officer or designee.

Work Performance

The College expects community members to strive for and meet high quality job performance standards at all times. Issues of poor performance or misconduct compromise both the worker and the organization. Prohibited behaviors include:

1. Refusal to follow reasonable instructions, perform assigned work, or comply with directives of authorized College officials.

2. Failure to wear proper uniform or identification in the prescribed manner as may be required. Departments may develop dress codes appropriate for their operation.

3. Sleeping on the job.

4. Failure or refusal to maintain or obtain required licensure, certification or registration.

5. Instigating or participating in deliberate low productivity and/or interfering with another employee’s work.

Standards of Attendance

The College depends upon community members to carry out the work of the institution; therefore, reliable, consistent attendance is an important requirement of all positions.

1. An absence without proper notification or satisfactory reason is unexcused. An absence for three (3) consecutive days without notification or satisfactory reason is considered a voluntary termination (job abandonment).

2. Tardiness is defined as arriving at work past the appointed starting time without supervisory approval. Repeated unauthorized tardiness will be grounds for disciplinary action.

3. Failure to report to the work place at the beginning of the work period, leaving the workplace prior to the end of the work period, and failure to inform the supervisor when leaving the work area are prohibited.

 Employees must avoid actual or apparent conflicts of interest, defined as using their position at the College for personal or financial gain for themselves or their family members. Potential conflicts may include soliciting business for personal gain, accepting employment or payment from a customer or vendor, accepting gifts other than those of $50.00, and/or requesting favors, discounts, or services. Senior Staff are required to affirm that they do not have a potential conflict of interest annually.
 
1. POLICY STATEMENT

Washington College’s educational mission is promoted by professionalism in student-faculty relationships and in supervisor/supervisee relationships. Professionalism is fostered by an atmosphere of mutual trust and respect in accordance with established standards of conduct. Taking note of the respect and trust accorded a staff or faculty member by a student and a supervisor by a supervisee, the faculty and staff recognize that they are presumed to make decisions regarding their relationships with students and supervisees which will not endanger this atmosphere of mutual trust and respect. Faculty and staff should be aware of the possibility that an apparent consensual relationship with a student or supervisee may be interpreted (either now or at a later date) as non-consensual and, therefore, as sexual harassment. The power differential inherent in employee/student and supervisor/supervisee relationships may compromise the student’s or supervisee’s freedom to decide and call into question the consensual nature of the relationship. The potential exists for the student or supervisee to perceive coercion in suggestions involving activities outside those appropriate to professional relationships. Moreover, faculty and staff, particularly in relationships with students and persons under their supervision, need to be aware of potential conflicts of interest, perceptions of favoritism and the possible compromise of their evaluative / supervisory capacity. They also need to be aware that a relationship may give rise to a perception that the evaluative capacity of the faculty member or supervisor has been compromised. For the reasons outlined in this policy, the college strongly discourages these relationships.

A. It is a violation of this policy for a faculty or staff member to undertake an amorous relationship or permit one to develop with a student or supervisee who is enrolled in the person’s class or is subject to that person’s supervision or evaluation, even when both parties appear to have consented to the relationship.

B. Amorous relationships between students and faculty or staff members outside the instructional and supervisory context are also strongly discouraged.

C. The College recognizes that consensual amorous relationships may exist prior to the time a student becomes a member of the faculty member’s class or is placed in a situation where the faculty or staff person must supervise or evaluate the student. It is also recognized that such a relationship may exist between co-employees prior to the time when one of those employees becomes the supervisor of the other. An amorous relationship is a recent amorous relationship if it is ongoing or has been in existence at any time within the six (6) months immediately preceding the assignment of the student or supervisee to the faculty or staff member. Where the faculty or staff member has, or has had, a recent amorous relationship with the student or supervisee the following procedures shall be followed:

1) If, at all possible, the student should be advised in his or her course selections to avoid course sections taught by the instructor with whom the student has or has had a recent consensual relationship. Efforts should likewise be made to place a subordinate under the supervision of another supervisor where the supervisor has or has had a recent consensual amorous relationship with the subordinate.

2) In the event it is not possible for the student to avoid the class taught by the faculty member or for the supervisee to avoid the supervision of the supervisor, the faculty member shall advise his or her department chair and Provost, and the supervisor shall advise his or her supervisor of the present or recent consensual amorous relationship and the following steps shall be taken in regards to students:

a. The department head shall appoint another instructor to evaluate the student’s written work, such as essays, research papers, essay tests, care plans, etc.

b. The department head shall appoint another instructor to evaluate the student’s non-written work or performance such as artistic performances, teaching practice or clinical practice.

c. When an appropriate instructor is not available to evaluate the student’s work, the department chair or Provost will provide an alternative solution at no expense to the College.

d. A student should not be assigned to a faculty advisor with whom that student has or has had a recent consensual amorous relationship. The faculty advisor should request that the student be reassigned.

The following steps will be taken in regards to employees:

e. A supervisor will request that his or her supervisor evaluate the supervisee and if such evaluation is not available, he or she will request that a supervisor of a related department evaluate the employee.

f. The supervisor will remove himself or herself from the consideration of the employee for promotion, hiring or determination of salary.

g. When an appropriate supervisor is not available to supervise the employee then the President in consultation with the Director of Human Resources decide if suitable supervision can be arranged or if one of the parties will be asked to resign.

3)  A faculty or staff member who fails to follow the policy set forth in No. 2 above, and does not withdraw from participation in activities or decisions which may reward or penalize a student or supervisee with whom the faculty or staff member has or has had a recent consensual amorous relationship in accordance with this policy will be in violation of this policy and is subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment.

4) Persons who are married, or were married, are included within the definition of those persons having, or who have had, a consensual amorous relationship.  Likewise, persons in a domestic partner relationship are included in this policy.

5) A complaint alleging violations of the policy regarding consensual relationships may be filed by any person and directed to the Human Resources Office. Procedures to be followed when complaints occur are those listed in the Sexual Harassment Policy.

 

Disciplinary and corrective action is a process to help employees overcome poor job performance, strengthen work performance and achieve success.  In the case of minor  work performance problems a private discussion between the supervisor and the employee is the  first  step  in the  positive  discipline procedure.  The  supervisor should  specify  the  job performance  or  conduct that  is  not  acceptable and  the  actions necessary to  correct  the performance problem.  The supervisor should begin with a personal agreement with the employee along with a follow up email or document regarding the discussion.

In instances of serious poor job performance or of repeated minor performance issues, written notice will be given to the employee and made part of the employee’s permanent personnel record that is maintained by Human Resources. Failure  by  an employee  to be responsive  to such  written warnings will  lead  to  further  disciplinary  action including suspension  without pay  and/or discharge.

In the case of alleged serious misconduct, the employee will be suspended immediately (with pay) and required to leave the campus. Serious misconduct generally includes behavior or actions that could threaten the physical or mental well-being of members of the College community or the reputation or standing of the College. Following  an incident that involves alleged serious misconduct,  the  immediate  supervisor,  the  department  director,  and  the  Director  of  Human Resources will discuss the alleged misconduct and develop an appropriate action plan.

The action plan should include an investigation and interview(s) with the appropriate personnel. All meetings, findings, and outcomes will be documented in the employee’s personnel record that is maintained by Human Resources.  Violation of these or similar rules may lead to discipline, up to and including immediate termination.  Please refer to the Discharge section of the Termination of Employment policy.

The employee will be given the opportunity to see any written notices reporting disciplinary actions or any evaluations in his/her personnel file. If the employee feels that the disciplinary action is unfair, he/she may file a grievance.  Please refer to Grievance process policy.

 

Policy Statement on Discrimination

Washington College does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, color, national or ethnic origin, age, religion, marital status, disability, sexual orientation gender identity, gender expression, genetic information, or other legally protected classification in the administration of any of its educational programs and activities or with respect to admission and employment.

The designated coordinator to ensure compliance with Title IX of the Educational Act Amendments of 1972 is Candace Wannamaker, Associate Vice President of Student Affairs and Title IX Coordinator, Casey Academic Center, Washington College, 300 Washington Avenue, Chestertown, Maryland, 21620, phone number (410) 778-7752.

The designated coordinator to ensure compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 is, Andrea Vassar, Director of Academic Skills, Clifton Miller Library, Washington College, 300 Washington Avenue, Chestertown, Maryland, 21620, phone number (410) 778-7883.

For additional information and/or to file a complaint contact the Director of Civil Rights, US Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights, The Wanamaker Building, 100 Penn Square East, Suite 515, Philadelphia, PA 19107, or local fair employment practices agencies.

 


Policy Statement on Harassment

Harassment in any form, whether based on race, sex, color, national or ethnic origin, age, religion, marital status, disability, sexual orientation, genetic information, or any other legally protected classification is unacceptable on the Washington College campus.

For purposes of this policy harassment means unwelcome verbal, written, or physical conduct based on a protected classification (race, color, sex, disability, etc.) that has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work or education, (including living conditions, extracurricular activities, and social life) creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment, or constituting a threat to an individual’s personal safety. Sexual harassment includes sexual violence/assault.


Policy Statement on Sexual Harassment

Washington College will not tolerate sexual harassment in any form. Sexual harassment includes sexual violence/assault/misconduct. The goal of this policy is to create a community free of sexual harassment. Sexual harassment committed in connection with any College program, whether on or off campus, is prohibited. This applies to academic, educational, extracurricular, athletic, residential, and other College programs. Sexual harassment may be a violation of state and federal laws as well as a violation of this policy. Individuals who feel they have been sexually harassed may have the right to bring legal action, in addition to making a complaint to the College. Legal action and an internal complaint can be pursued at the same time. Retaliation against an individual who brings a complaint, participates in an investigation of sexual harassment, or pursues legal action is prohibited.

The essential importance of academic freedom is recognized and a standard of reasonableness will guide the College. Only when academic freedom is used to disguise, or as the vehicle for, prohibited conduct will it be questioned.

Washington College believes that ideas, creativity, and free expression thrive and, indeed, can only exist for students, faculty, and staff in an atmosphere free of sexual harassment and assault.

Definition of Sexual Harassment

Federal Law (Title VII of the Civil Rights Law of l964 and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972) provides that sexual harassment shall be considered a form of gender discrimination. Maryland Law also prohibits gender discrimination and sexual harassment.

Sexual harassment is defined as any unwelcome sexual advance, request for sexual favors, or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature which has the purpose or effect of interfering with one’s academic or work performance or social world by creating an intimidating, hostile, offensive, or violent environment. Sexual violence/assault is also considered sexual harassment.

Examples of Sexual Harassment:
  • Action of an individual in a position of institutional power or authority who misuses that position to subject an individual to unwanted sexual attention of either a verbal or physical nature when that conduct is either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of a person’s employment or academic status.
  • Demanding sexual favors accompanied by implied or overt threats or promises concerning grades, recommendations, or evaluations.
  • Inappropriate sexual conduct that interferes with an individual’s work performance or educational experience by creating an uncomfortable environment. This prohibition applies to all relationships at the institution between members of the College community.
  • Inappropriate conduct against an individual that interferes with an individual’s work performance or educational experience by creating an uncomfortable environment that would not occur but for the sex of the individual.

Consensual Relationships

Washington College policies prohibit unreciprocated and unwelcome relationships. However, persons in positions of power, authority, and control over others should be aware of and sensitive to problems that may arise from mutual relationships that are inherently unequal. Individuals in these situations are urged to examine such relationships before engaging in them, especially in terms of emotional health, self-esteem, and respect for the freedom of others.

Apparently consensual sexual relationships, particularly those between individuals of unequal status, may be or become a violation of this policy. Anyone who engages in a sexual relationship with a person over whom he or she has any degree of power or authority must understand that the validity of the consent involved can and may be questioned. The College particularly abhors the abuse potentially inherent in sexual relationships between faculty members and students and between staff supervisors and their student employees.


Reporting Discrimination or Harassment

Discrimination or Harassment Based on Disability

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, amended in 2008, prohibits discrimination based on disability. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 prohibits discrimination based on disability in programs or activities receiving federal financial assistance.

Examples of Harassment based on Disability:
  • Lack of access to educational programs and facilities
  • Denial of academic adjustments or accommodations
  • Offensive remarks, jokes, epithets, slurs, negative stereotyping or threatening, intimidating or hostile acts that relate to a person’s disability

 

Discrimination or Harassment Complaints

Washington College encourages anyone who has experienced any form of discrimination or harassment to report the incident promptly, to seek all available assistance, and to pursue remedies available through campus judicial or grievance processes. Reporting Parties are also encouraged to report incidents to local, state and/or federal authorities or offices charged with handling unlawful discrimination or harassment.

Reporting a Complaint

Students, employees, or third parties who believe they have been subjected to discrimination or harassment, including sexual violence/assault, by a student or employee of the Washington College community or by another individual for whom the College is or may be responsible (e.g., applicants for admission or employment, alumni, independent contractors, vendors, recruiters) should contact one of the following persons for assistance with resolving a complaint:

  • Title IX Coordinator or Assistant Coordinator(s) – for matters involving discrimination or harassment based on sex or gender
  • 504 Coordinator or Assistant Coordinator(s) – for matters involving discrimination or harassment based on disability
  • Professional Staff in Student Affairs (Including Resident Area Directors/RADs)
  • Department of Public Safety
  • Human Resources Department

Complaints alleging sexual discrimination or harassment (including sexual assault/violence) should be submitted to Candace Wannamaker, Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and the College’s Title IX Coordinator, first floor Casey Academic Center, 410-778-7752.

Complaints alleging disability discrimination or harassment should be submitted to Andrea Vassar, Director of Academic Skills and the College’s Section ADA/Section 504 Coordinator, Clifton Miller Library, 410-778-7883.

When a Washington College student is the subject of a discrimination or harassment complaint, the matter will be referred to the Honor Board or other appropriate hearing body (see the Washington College Honor Code and Student Judicial System found earlier in this Handbook).

When a Washington College employee or third party is the subject of a formal written complaint, the matter will be reviewed by the Washington College Discrimination Dispute Resolution Committee (DDRC).

Students, employees, or third parties alleging discrimination or harassment may submit a complaint in writing using the Discrimination/Harassment complaint form. Complaint forms are available in Public Safety, Student Affairs, Human Resources and Title IX Coordinator’s Office or for download and printing from the College website at http://www.washcoll.edu/title-ix/.

Interim Measures

The Title IX Coordinator or 504 ADA Coordinator will determine, with campus administrators, the appropriate interim measures to be taken during the investigation. Interim remedial actions can include, but are not limited to the following:

No Contact Orders Interim Suspension Administrative Leave (Employee) Reassignment of Housing Reassignment of Job Class Schedule Change Prohibit or restrict participation in extracurricular activities Prohibit or restrict access to campus for third parties Relocation of a residential assignment

Investigating a Complaint

All complaints of harassment or discrimination will be investigated in a manner that is adequate, reliable, and impartial. Investigations may be conducted by trained Public Safety staff, trained Title IX Investigators, the Title IX Coordinator or Assistant Coordinators (for Title IX matters), the Section 504 Coordinator or Assistant Coordinators (for ADA/Section 504 related matters), Human Resources staff, or another trained investigator appropriate to the situation and in accordance with all College policies and legal requirements.

For matters involving discrimination or harassment based on sex or gender (covered by Title IX), the Title IX Coordinator will ensure that the investigation complies with all Title IX requirements. For matters involving discrimination or harassment based on disability (covered by ADA/Section 504), the Section 504 Coordinator will ensure the investigation complies with all Section 504 requirements.

The responsibility to conduct an investigation shall not be altered by the fact that a criminal investigation of the incident is pending or has been concluded, although the investigation may be delayed or suspended at the request of law enforcement while the law enforcement agency is gathering evidence. In the event the investigation is delayed at request of law enforcement agency, appropriate steps will be taken to provide for the safety of the Reporting Party and the College community and to prevent retaliation by any individual. The steps may include changes to the schedule, housing assignment or work location of the Responding Party or summary suspension/leave from the College issued to the Responding Party. The College will promptly resume its Title IX investigation as soon the College receives notification that law enforcement has completed the evidence-gathering process.

Investigation Process:

The Reporting Party will be contacted by a College administrator designated by the Title IX Coordinator or ADA/Section 504 Coordinator to schedule a meeting. During the meeting, the College administrator will:

Provide Reporting Party with an explanation of the campus conduct process. Give the Reporting Party the opportunity to submit a written statement and evidence. Give the Reporting Party the opportunity to list any witnesses who may have information pertaining to the complaint. Inform the Reporting Party to have no contact with the Responding Party during the course of the investigation. Inform the Reporting Party that there will be follow-up meetings to discuss the case and status.

The Responding Party will be contacted by a College administrator designated by the Title IX Coordinator or Section 504/ADA Coordinator to schedule a meeting.

During the meetings, the College administrator will:

  • Provide Responding Party with an explanation of the campus conduct process.
  • Present the allegations and provided the Responding Party the opportunity to respond.
  • Give the Responding Party the opportunity to submit a written statement and evidence to contest the allegations.
  • Give the Responding Party the opportunity to list any witnesses who may have information pertaining to the complaint.
  • Inform the Responding Party to have no contact with the Reporting Party during the course of the investigation. Inform the Responding Party that there will be follow-up meetings to discuss the case and status.

Any person identified by the Reporting Party or Responding Party who has information that pertains to the allegation will be contact by the investigator(s).

The person designated to conduct the investigation shall prepare a written report within fifteen (15) business days after completing the investigation, unless additional time to complete the investigation is required. In that case, the investigator shall report on the status of the investigation to the Reporting Party, the Responding Party, and the Title IX or Section 504 Coordinator (or designee) as applicable at the expiration of the fifteen (15) day period and every fifteen (15) business days thereafter.

At the conclusion of the investigation, a designated College administrator will meet with the Reporting Party and discuss the written report and inform him/her of the next steps in the process.

The designated college administrator will contact the Responding Party and review the written report and explain the next steps in the process.

The Reporting Party and Responding Party may have a support person present during the investigation process. A support person is defined as a member of the College community (faculty, staff, or student). The support person is not permitted to participate in the meetings, but is there in support of the individual.

The written report is a summary of the investigation and will be forwarded to the appropriate administrator. The administrator will then forward the report to the Honor Board or the Discrimination Complaint Review Committee (DDRC) for review and any action deemed appropriate in accordance with the procedures of each.

Nothing in these procedures or in the procedures of the Honor Board or DDRC limits the right of any person to pursue other avenues of recourse which may include filing charges or a complaint with local, state and federal authorities responsible for addressing unlawful discrimination and harassment.

More information about the procedures of the Honor Board can be found in the chapter “Washington College Honor Code and Student Judicial System” found earlier in this Handbook.

Resolving Complaints

The Title IX Coordinator or Section 504 Coordinator or other appropriate College administrator will ensure that steps are taken to address and resolve any instance where an investigation and subsequent review (by either the Honor Board or the DDRC) concluded discrimination or harassment occurred. Resolution outcomes include actions to remediate the instance of discrimination or harassment and, where needed, actions to prevent future recurrence and to correct discriminatory effects on the Reporting Party and others.

Remedial actions include, but are not limited to:

  • College Warning (Except in cases of Sexual Assault/Violence)
  • Suspension/Expulsion
  • Probation Termination of Employment
  • Protection from Retaliation Counseling for the Reporting Party
  • Other steps to address the impact of harassment or discrimination on the Reporting Party, any witnesses and the College community

Discrimination and Dispute Resolution Committee (DDRC)

The Washington College Discrimination Dispute Resolution Committee (DDRC) is used when the subject of a formal written complaint is an employee or third party. The DDRC will consist of faculty and staff, trained to review matters involving discrimination and harassment. A hearing panel will consist of three members of the DDRC and is facilitated by the Director of Human Resources (or designee) for complaints against staff members or Provost (or designee) for complaints against faculty. Hearings where there is a staff Responding Party will include two staff members and one faculty member on the hearing panel. Within 15 days after the hearing, the panel will issue a written decision that includes a review of the information relevant to the case and sanctions assigned if it is found to be “more likely than not” that the subject of the Complaint violated College policy. The DDRC will continue to function whenever the College is open even if classes are not in session.

Records

Records of complaint investigation and any corrective action will be entrusted to the Title IX Coordinator or ADA/Section 504 Coordinator and will be maintained in an electronic system accessible throughout the College on a confidential basis consistent with College’s legal requirements and appropriate legal requests for said documents.

Making an Appeal

The Reporting Party or Responding Party may appeal decisions of the DDRC or Honor Board by submitting a written appeal request within five business days of receiving written notification of the outcome of the hearing. Appeal forms can be downloaded from the following website http://www.washcoll.edu/title-ix/. Only appeals that are based on one or more of the following grounds will be considered for review: 

  • Procedural error(s) that prevented fundamental fairness;
  • New information or evidence that was not available at the hearing;
  • An imposed sanction that is disproportionate to the violation and/or the conduct history of the Responding Party;

Letters of appeal for Honor Board decisions must be sent to the Vice President of Student Affairs (or designee). The Vice President for Student Affairs or designee will determine whether or not the appeal meets the above criteria. If any of the criteria are met, the case will be referred to the appeal board; if the case does not meet at least one of the criteria, there will be no further review. More information on the student appeal process can be found in the Student Handbook. Letters of appeal for DDRC decisions must be sent to the President of the College (or designee). The President of the College (or designee) will determine whether or not the appeal meets the above criteria. If any of the criteria are met, the case will be reviewed and a decision made; if the case does not meet at least one of the criteria, there will be no further review. The appellant(s) and the other party, shall be notified of the outcome of the appeal. All appeals will be conducted in an impartial manner and by an impartial decision-maker.

Retaliation

All members of the Washington College community are advised that retaliation against anyone for filing a complaint of discrimination or harassment or for participating in an investigation of discrimination or harassment is strictly prohibited by law and by College policy.

Confidentiality

All parties involved, especially those charged with carrying out the above policies, are enjoined to work in confidence to the extent legally permissible and practically possible.

In cases of discrimination and harassment, Reporting Parties may also obtain information and/or file a complaint by writing the Director of Civil Rights, US Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights, The Wanamaker Building, 100 Penn Square East, Suite 515, Philadelphia, PA 19107. Such complaints generally must be filed within 180 days.


Policy on Sexual Assault

When sexual misconduct or sexual violence in any form occurs, the standards of the community, and possibly criminal laws, are violated. When reported, the College will deal with these issues in accordance with its policies and procedures and as required by applicable laws. Sexual misconduct committed in connection with any College program, whether on or off campus, is prohibited. This includes all College programs including, but not limited to, academic, educational, extra-curricular, athletic, and residential programs.

Washington College urges individuals who believe they have been sexually assaulted to pursue criminal charges against the person or persons they believe to have committed the sexual assault. A criminal charge and an internal complaint can be pursued at the same time. Retaliation against an individual who brings a complaint, participates in an investigation, or pursues legal action is prohibited and possible violations will be investigated and violations addressed in accordance with College policy and procedures.

In cases of sexual assault or other sexual misconduct, College authorities will inform a Reporting Party of the option of criminal prosecution and medical assistance, as well as the Reporting Party’s rights under the Crime Reporting Party’s Bill of Rights. This includes the right to assistance from the Maryland State Crime Reporting Parties Reparation Board and the Maryland State Office of the Crime Reporting Party Ombudsman. A Reporting Party will also be informed of the right to file a complaint of sexual harassment (which includes sexual assault/violence). Students or employees wishing to file a complaint should follow the procedures outlined in the “Reporting Discrimination and Harassment” section found earlier.

When a Washington College student is the subject of a sexual assault/violence complaint, the individual filing the complaint will be informed about the role of the Honor Board’s Sexual Misconduct Hearing Board in evaluating whether the student who is the subject of the complaint is responsible for violations of College policy (including policies addressing discrimination and harassment). When a Washington College employee or third party is the subject of a sexual assault/violence complaint, the individual filing the complaint will be informed about the role of the D or appropriate administrator in evaluating whether the individual who is the subject of the complaint is responsible for violations of College policy (including policies addressing discrimination and harassment).

College authorities, normally the Director of Public Safety, will notify the Chestertown Police of the sexual assault only at the request of the student or employee filing the complaint and will provide assistance in notifying any other law enforcement authorities or in preserving materials that may be relevant to the internal complaint process. At the direction of the Chestertown Police, College authorities will provide assistance in obtaining, securing, and maintaining evidence for criminal prosecution.

Consent

Definition of Consent

Consent is the equivalent of approval, given freely, willingly, and knowingly, of each participant to each sexual involvement. Consent is an affirmative, conscious decision – indicated clearly by words or actions – to engage in mutually accepted sexual contact. A person engaging in sexual contact by force, threat of force, or coercion has not consented to contact.

Lack of mutual consent is the crucial factor in any sexual misconduct case. Consent to some form of sexual activity does not necessarily constitute consent to another form of sexual activity even within the same initial consensual activity. Consent to past sexual activity does not imply consent to future sexual activity. Consent can be withdrawn at any time. Consent to engage in sexual activity with one person does not imply consent to engage in sexual activity with another. Silence without demonstrating permission does not constitute consent. Consent CANNOT be given if a person’s ability to resist or consent is incapacitated because of a mental illness or physical condition (by alcohol or other drugs, unconsciousness, sleep, or blackout) or if there is a significant age or perceived power differential.

Sexual activity with someone who the Responding Party should know to be, or based on the circumstances should reasonably have known to be, mentally or physically incapacitated (by alcohol or other drugs, unconsciousness, sleep, or blackout) is sexual activity without consent.

Interim Measures

By decision of the President of the College, the Vice President of Student Affairs, or a designee of either, an individual who is the subject of a sexual assault complaint may, without prejudice, be removed from the campus or subjected to other forms of restriction with regard to the Reporting Party, pending formal judicial action or criminal procedures, to avoid additional conflict within the community and/or to protect the safety of members of the College community.

Resources for Victims of Sexual Assault

There are many services established to assist individuals who have been sexually assaulted. Rachel Boyle, Director of Prevention Education and Advocacy, ext. 7277, campus sexual assault response advocates (SARA) or other student affairs staff members (see list below under Education and Training) may be contacted to provide assistance or for any questions.

  • Washington College Health Services, ext. 7261
  • Washington College Counseling Services, ext. 7261
  • “For All Seasons, Inc.” Sexual Assault Crisis Center, 1-800-310-7273 (A 24-hour confidential service that provides counseling, advocacy and support to survivors.)
  • Office of Public Safety, ext. 7810

A member of the Campus Department of Public Safety is available 24 hours a day and 7 days a week to transport the Reporting Party to either hospital listed below if requested. Volunteers from the For All Seasons Sexual Assault Crisis Center are also available to provide counseling and assistance throughout this process.

Two area hospitals have sexual assault response programs in place. Forensic Nurse Examiners are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to provide confidential medical examination, STI and pregnancy prophylactics. The programs work in conjunction with For All Seasons, Inc., to provide advocacy support to victims.

  • University of Maryland Shore Medical Center at Chestertown, 410-778-3300
    (located adjacent to Washington College)
  • University of Maryland Shore Medical Center at Easton 410-822-1000

The Director of Prevention Education and Advocacy, serving as the sexual assault response coordinator, will inform the Reporting Party, at a minimum, of internal complaint options, availability of confidential counseling, mechanisms available to address concerns about physical safety, as well as the possibility of alternative housing assignments or classroom arrangements (where appropriate).


Education and Training

The Office of Prevention Education and Advocacy is responsible for developing and coordinating educational and training programs for students about sexual assault and sexual violence. To address issues of sexual assault and sexual violence proactively, the College will distribute these policies to and provide training for students and employees. In addition, these policies will be communicated at appropriate opportunities in classes, meetings, programs, and publications.

 


Sexual Assault Amnesty Protocol

Washington College encourages the reporting of sexual misconduct. The College recognizes that individuals who have been drinking and/or using drugs (whether use is voluntary or involuntary) at the time that violence, including but not limited to domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, sexual misconduct or sexual assault occurs may be hesitant to report such incidents due to fear of potential consequences for their own conduct. An individual reporting sexual violence to College officials or a bystander reporting such violations, provided that their behavior did not place the health and safety of any person at risk, will not be subject to disciplinary action for violations of alcohol and other drug policies occurring at the time of the sexual misconduct.

Sexual Assault Campus Climate Survey

In compliance with Maryland House Bill 571, Washington College conducted a sexual assault campus climate survey in March of 2016 and will do so every two years.

 People to contact for more information:

  • Sarah Feyerherm, Vice President of Student Affairs, ext. 7752
  • Candace Wannamaker, Associate Vice President for Student Affairs/Title IX Coordinator, ext. 7752
  • Ursula Herz, Associate Dean of Students and Director of Residence Life, ext. 7752
  • Rachel Boyle, Director of Prevention Education and Advocacy and Sexual Assault Response Coordinator, ext. 7277
  • Lisa Marx, Director of Health Services, ext. 7261
  • Miranda Altman, Director of Counseling Services, ext. 7289
  • Jerry Roderick, Director of Public Safety, ext. 7810
  • Sexual Assault Response Advocate (SARA) 410-699-0742
 Washington College is an equal opportunity employer and, as such, takes affirmative action to insure that applicants for employment are considered, and employees are treated, in compliance with applicable laws and regulations governing equal employment opportunity and non-discrimination in employment on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, age, sex, sexual orientation, disability, handicap, or other factors prohibited by law.
 

Treating employees fairly is a key principle of the employment relationship and a productive workplace. When people work together, however, it is not unusual for conflicts or dissatisfaction to arise.  If there is something about your job that is bothering you, we encourage you to take appropriate action to resolve concerns.   This Grievance Resolution Procedure is designed to assist you.  The Human Resources staff is available to assist when and where needed and appropriate.

Washington College encourages anyone who has experienced any form of discrimination or harassment, including sexual violence, to report the incident promptly, to seek all available assistance, and to pursue remedies available through the College’s Discrimination and Harassment Policies (https://www.washcoll.edu/offices/human-resources/college-policies/discrimination-and-harassment-policies.php).  This Grievance Resolution Procedure is used for work-related concerns other than alleged discrimination or harassment. 

Problem-Solving Conversations

You are strongly encouraged to discuss any work-related problem with your supervisor or the person most directly involved with the problem you are confronting as soon as possible.  Those persons can discuss your concerns with you in an effort to resolve the matter.  If you are uncomfortable speaking with that individual, or if discussions do not resolve the issue, please arrange to talk with a member of the Human Resources Department for further assistance.  The staff of the Human Resources Department is available to assist you in defining your concern and exploring alternative approaches for resolving your problem.  Typically, many problems can be resolved through prompt conversations about the concern.  Human Resources staff may recommend additional problem-solving processes including mediation.

Grievance Process

When work related concerns have not been resolved through Problem-Solving Conversations steps outlined above, and after consultation with Human Resources, the Grievance Process may be used. Only a current or former Washington College employee may bring forward a grievance complaint under this process.  A grievance complaint is defined as an unresolved issue regarding an alleged misapplication or violation of College policy, practice, or procedure, other than harassment or discrimination.  The Grievance Process may not be invoked as an alternative to other established procedures (e.g., regarding faculty tenure and promotion) and the following actions are not grievable: demotion without reduction in pay, suspension with pay, termination of a probationary employee during the introductory period.


Step 1: Submit the grievance Complaint

The charging employee must submit a written statement of the grievance complaint to the Director of Human Resources or designee. The written statement must identify the written policy, procedure or practice alleged to have been violated, the date of the event(s) on which the grievance complaint is based, and the relevant information, including the information which supports the employee’s position.   Finally, the grievance complaint must propose a resolution to the problem.  Human Resources staff is available to assist employees in the preparation of a written grievance.  Grievance complaints ordinarily should be filed no later than 180 calendar days after the event or action that is the subject of the grievance.

If the Director of Human Resources determines that the matter raised in the grievance complaint does not fit the definition of a grievance or that appropriate problem-solving Conversations  have not been attempted prior to filing a grievance complaint, as defined above, the charging employee will be notified of such and the grievance process will be concluded.  A charging employee may appeal a decision of the Director of Human Resources to the Chief of Staff.

The respondent (i.e., the person whose action is the subject of the grievance), after consulting with his or her department head and Human Resources staff, will submit a written answer to the grievance complaint, normally within fifteen (15) working days after the receipt of the grievance complaint, and at the same time submit a copy to the Director of Human Resources.  If the response is not satisfactory to the charging employee, she/he will inform Human Resources staff to proceed to Step 2.

Step 2: Request for Review

Within five (5) working days after receipt of the Step 1 response, the charging employee must submit a written statement to the Director of Human Resources explaining the reasons why he or she is appealing the Step 1 response. The Director of Human Resources will then appoint a grievance panel selected from among the members of the College’s Discrimination and Dispute Review Committee (DDRC), which is appointed by the President in consultation with Staff Council and Administrative Council. The grievance panel will consist of three members of the DDRC and is facilitated by the Director of Human Resources (or designee) for complaints against staff members or Provost (or designee) for complaints against faculty. Hearings where there is a staff Respondent will include two staff members and one faculty member on the hearing panel.  Hearings where there is a faculty Respondent will include two faculty members and one staff member on the hearing panel.The DDRC will continue to function whenever the College is open even if classes are not in session.

At the hearing, the charging employee and the respondent may present statements and also present witnesses and materials in support of his/her position. Any employee who participates in the hearing, whether on his/her own behalf or for a co-worker, will not be subject to retaliatory action.  

Within 15 days after the hearing, the Grievance Panel will issue a written report that includes a review of the information relevant to the case, findings, and recommendations. The report will be shared with the charging employee and the respondent and forwarded to the President.

The President will review the report and may accept, reject, or modify the conclusions and recommendations of the Grievance Committee. The President will forward a written answer to the charging employee, the respondent, and the Director of Human Resources. The decision of the President is final.

 

3. Time Limits

The time limits included in this procedure are designed to support a speedy resolution while providing sufficient time to prepare and present information. Scheduling constraints may impact the time limits and as a result the College, at its discretion, may modify the time limits.

If the College does not extend time limits and an employee does not observe the time limits in any particular step, the grievance will be considered to be ended.

4. Disclaimer

This policy shall not be construed as a contract of employment, and it is subject to change by the college in its discretion without prior notice to employees, as the College deems appropriate.

5. Confidentiality

All parties involved, especially those charged with carrying out the above policies, are expected to maintain confidentiality to the greatest extent practicable. Records pertaining to grievance complaints will be maintained in the Office of Human Resources for three years after the resolution of the complaint, at which time the records will be destroyed.  Records regarding any sanctions imposed  will  be  maintained in  accordance with  normal  personnel records policies, as applicable.

 

Washington College recognizes the need for flexibility in regard to each employee’s position and the goals and objectives of the department and the College. The director and supervisor(s) of a department may decide to reorganize or change materially the duties and responsibilities of the personnel in a department or of an individual employee in order to best utilize each individual’s skill sets and to better meet the department’s goals and objectives. It is also commonplace for position descriptions to include the phrase “other duties as assigned.” This means employees may be required to perform tasks that are beyond the scope of the position’s core function.

A supervisor may rewrite a position description when these duties become the norm and increase the scope of the employee’s job. In advance of any changes to a position description or reorganization within the department, the supervisor(s) will meet with the employee(s) involved to discuss the proposed changes. A revised position description must be submitted to the Director of Human Resources for approval before it is discussed with the employee.

If an employee’s employment status changes materially, a new letter of appointment will be written to confirm the change. For minor changes, a Personnel Change Form will be used to document the change. The employee will receive a copy of the appointment or Personnel Change Form and the original will be placed in the employee’s personnel file.

Federal law (Title VII of the Civil Rights Law of 1964 and Title IX of the Education

Amendments of 1972) provides that sexual harassment shall be considered a form of sex discrimination.  Maryland Law also prohibits sex discrimination and sexual harassment.

Washington College prohibits sexual harassment of any member of the community – whether faculty, student, or employee – by any person.  Sexual harassment is defined as any unwelcome sexual advance, request for sexual favors, or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature which has the purpose or effect of interfering with one’s academic or work performance or social world by creating an intimidating, hostile, offensive, or violent environment. Sexual violence/assault is also considered sexual harassment.

Harassment in any form, whether based on race, sex, color, national or ethnic origin, age, religion, marital status, disability, sexual orientation, genetic information, or any other legally protected classification, is unacceptable on the Washington College campus.

For purposes of this policy harassment means unwelcome verbal, written, or physical conduct based on a protected classification (race, color, sex, disability, etc.) that has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work or education (including living conditions, extracurricular activities, and social life), creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment, or constituting a threat to an individual’s personal safety. Sexual harassment includes sexual violence/assault.

Washington College will not tolerate sexual harassment in any form. Sexual harassment includes sexual violence/assault. The goal of this policy is to create a community free of sexual harassment. Sexual harassment committed in connection with any College program, whether on or off campus, is prohibited. This applies to academic, educational, extracurricular, athletic, residential, and other College programs. Sexual harassment may be a violation of state and federal laws as well as a violation of this policy. Individuals who feel they have been sexually harassed may have the right to bring legal action, in addition to making a complaint to the College. Legal action and an internal complaint can be pursued at the same time. Retaliation against an individual who brings a complaint, participates in an investigation of sexual harassment, or pursues legal action is prohibited.

The essential importance of academic freedom is recognized and a standard of reasonableness will guide the College. Only when academic freedom is used to disguise, or as the vehicle for, prohibited conduct will it be questioned. Washington College believes that ideas, creativity, and free expression thrive and, indeed, can only exist for students, faculty, and staff in an atmosphere free of sexual harassment and assault.

Examples of sexual harassment:

  1. Action of an individual in a position of institutional power or authority who misuses that position to subject an individual to unwanted sexual attention of either a verbal or physical nature when that conduct is either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of a person’s employment or academic status.
  2. Demanding sexual favors accompanied by implied or overt threats or promises concerning grades, recommendations, or evaluations.
  3. Inappropriate sexual conduct that interferes with an individual’s work performance or educational experience by creating an uncomfortable environment. This prohibition applies to all relationships at the institution between members of the College community.
  4. Inappropriate conduct against an individual that interferes with an individual’s work performance or educational experience by creating an uncomfortable environment that would not occur but for the sex of the individual.

Consensual Relationships

Washington College policies prohibit unreciprocated and unwelcome relationships. However, persons in positions of power, authority, and control over others should be aware of and sensitive to problems that may arise from mutual relationships that are inherently unequal. Individuals in these situations are urged to examine such relationships before engaging in them, especially in terms of emotional health, self-esteem, and respect for the freedom of others.

Apparently consensual sexual relationships, particularly those between individuals of unequal status, may be or become a violation of this policy. Anyone who engages in a sexual relationship with a person over whom he or she has any degree of power or authority must understand that the validity of the consent involved can and may be questioned. The College particularly abhors the abuse potentially inherent in sexual relationships between faculty members and students and between staff supervisors and their student employees.

Employees or third parties, who believe that they have been subjected to discrimination or harassment (including sexual violence/assault) by an employee of the College or by another individual for whom the College is or may be responsible (alumni visiting campus, contract vendors providing a campus service, etc.) should contact one of the following to file a complaint:

Associate Vice President for Student Affairs/Title IX Coordinator

Director of Human Resources

Director of Public Safety

Retaliation

All members of the Washington College community are advised that retaliation against anyone for filing a complaint of discrimination or harassment, including sexual violence/assault is prohibited. Members of the community should be equally aware that knowingly making false allegations of harassment or discrimination is itself a violation of College policy and the individual involved will be subject to disciplinary action.

Resources

There are many services established to assist individuals who have been sexually assaulted. The Student Affairs Office, 410-778-7752, as well as the resources listed below may be contacted to provide assistance or answer any questions.

Washington College Health Services, 410-778-7261


Washington College Counseling Services, 410-778-7261, 7289, or 7826


“For All Seasons, Inc.” Sexual Assault Crisis Center, 1-800-310-7273 (A 24-hour confidential service that provides counseling, advocacy and support to survivors.)


Office of Public Safety, 410-778-7810

Local Emergency, Police, Fire and Ambulance – dial 911 (or 9-911 from a campus phone)

Hospitals

University of Maryland Shore Medical Center at Chestertown, 410-778-3300 – located adjacent to Washington College

Memorial Hospital in Easton, Maryland, 410-822-1000

Employee Resources

Employee Assistance Program (EAP), 866-248-4096

 
 
Resignation

If an employee resigns their position at Washington College, they must submit a letter of resignation to their supervisor and a copy to the Office of Human Resources at least two weeks prior to the last day of work to allow for the recruitment process to be begin and to provide for an organized transition. A date for departure must be discussed with the supervisor and mutually agreed upon.

Retirement

An employee who plans to retire must notify their supervisor and the Assistant Director of Human Resources as soon as possible. Any employee who is retiring must schedule an appointment with the Assistant Director of Human Resources to discuss the exit process. It can require three to four months to plan for the commencement of retirement benefits.

Discharge

A supervisor or department head may discharge an employee after a recommendation for discharge and documentation of the reason(s) for recommended discharge have been reviewed and approved by the Director of Human Resources.

If the discharge of any employee has been approved, a meeting will be scheduled with the employee, the Supervisor or Department Head and the Director of Human Resources to inform the employee of the decision to terminate employment. The employee will be given an opportunity to respond and will be informed of the opportunity to file a written rebuttal with Human Resources.

When an employee is being discharged, the Director of Human Resources will provide a Discharge Letter identifying the reason(s) for discharge. If the employee is unavailable to receive the Discharge Letter, it will be mailed to the employee at the address on file with Human Resources. An employee who disagrees with the grounds for termination may submit a written rebuttal to the Director of Human Resources within five days of the date of the Discharge Letter. The employee may also file a grievance with the Chief of Staff.

Reduction In Force

The College may eliminate a position if financial constraints or changes in the College’s organizational structure require such action.  Employees will be provided written notification from the College of the effective date of the change. An employee whose position is being eliminated will be given appropriate consideration for other vacant positions for which they may be qualified, but if no such position is available, employment with the College will be terminated.  Please see Reduction in Force Policy for further details.

Exit Process

At the time of voluntary or involuntary termination of employment, the employee must do the following:

  1. Meet with supervisor to discuss separation
  2. Schedule an Exit Interview with Human Resources to review the exit process. Call 410-778-7298 or email hr@washcoll.edu to schedule an appointment.
  3. Prior to the last day of employment, the employee must complete all sections of the Exit Clearance Form and submit to the Office of Human Resources to be cleared to receive final pay.

By the last day of employment, the Exit Clearance Form must be submitted to Human Resources, all property must be returned to the College for an employee to be cleared. Human Resources must have completed the exit interview prior to the last day of work so that the final paycheck can be released on time.

Reduction In Force

When staff and faculty have worked for the College for at least 15 years of continuous service and are retiring, the College will provide a retirement celebration.  For faculty who typically retire at the end of a semester, this celebration is typically held at Hynson Ringgold House as part of a holiday or year-end celebration; all faculty retiring at that time will be honored together.  For staff, who often retire at various points in the year, a budget of up to $500 will be provided to support the celebration’s food, entertainment and similar expenses; if a staff member is retiring near/at the end of a semester, he/she will be included with the faculty retirement celebration (no separate $500 celebration).  Not all retirees want such a celebration, so please honor your colleague in an appropriate, respectful way that will recognize their service to the College in a way that he/she appreciates.  Please feel free to connect with Human Resources staff for guidance.

If an employee resigns prior to completing 15 years of continuous service, any farewell gathering will not be financially supported by the College.  Departments or colleagues should feel free to organize and collectively or individually fund gatherings if they are so moved.

Washington College strives to operate in an ethical, honest and lawful manner and expects its employees, students, and third parties doing business with the College to conduct their activities in accordance with College policies and applicable law at all times. 

A culture of compliance strengthens and promotes ethical practices and respectful treatment of all members of the College community and those who conduct business with the College.

The College strongly encourages any employee or student to report suspected or actual wrongful conduct by a College contractor/vendor, student or employee that may include but is not limited to any of the following:

  • violation of state or federal law or regulations;
  • fraud;
  • misappropriation or misuse of College, or government resources (financial or human);
  • action or failure to act that endangers the health or safety of the public, students or employees;
  • abuses of authority; 

Reports may be made to one’s supervisor, in the case of employees, or to the College’s Risk Manager or Director of Human Resources.  There are private telephone lines (without caller identification) for this purpose which cannot be traced without a directive from Public Safety and/or a court order.  The Whistle Blower line can be reached by dialing 1-410-778-7784.

No College employee or student may interfere with the good faith reporting of suspected or actual wrongful conduct.  In addition, individuals who make such reports or participate in investigations of reports shall be protected from any retaliation such as harassment, adverse employment actions, or academic or educational consequences.  Violations of the prohibition against retaliation will result in disciplinary action up to and including dismissal.

 A.   Filing a Report

1. Any person may report allegations of suspected violation of College policies or State or Federal laws. Knowledge or suspicion of such behaviors may originate from faculty, staff or administrators carrying out their assigned duties, external auditors, law enforcement, regulatory agencies, and customers, vendors, students or other third parties. Allegations of suspected improper activities may be reported anonymously.

2. Reports of allegations of suspected improper activities are encouraged to be made in writing so as to assure a clear understanding of the issues raised, but may be made orally. Such reports should be factual rather than speculative or conclusory, and contain as much specific information as possible to allow for proper assessment of the nature, extent and urgency of preliminary investigative procedures.

3. The College recommends that any reports by persons who are not College employees be made to the Risk Manager. Such reports may also be made to another College official whom the reporting person may reasonably expect to have either responsibility over the affected area or the authority to review the alleged improper activity on behalf of the College.

4. Normally, a report by an employee of allegations of a suspected improper activity should be made to the reporting employee’s immediate supervisor or other appropriate administrator or supervisor within the operating unit (such as the unit head), or to the Risk Manager. However, in the interest of confidentiality, when there is a potential conflict of interest or for other reasons, such reports may be made to another College official whom the reporting employee may reasonably expect to have either responsibility over the affected area or the authority to review the alleged improper activity on behalf of the College.

5. When a person reports allegations of suspected improper activities to an appropriate authority the report is known as a protected disclosure. The rights of College employees and applicants for employment when making a protected disclosure are covered by the Whistle Blower Policy.

6. All College employees, and especially any academic or staff employee in a supervisory role, should be aware of and alert to either oral or written, formal or informal communications that may constitute a report of allegations of suspected improper activity. Anonymous Whistle Blowers must provide sufficient corroborating evidence to justify the commencement of an investigation. An investigation of unspecified wrong-doing or broad based allegations will not be undertaken without identifiable evidentiary support. Because investigators are unable to interview anonymous Whistler Blowers, it may be more difficult to evaluate credibility of the allegations and therefore, less likely to cause an investigation to be initiated.

B.    Reporting to the Risk Manager
  1. Managers, administrators and employees in supervisory roles who receive a report alleging suspected improper activities shall ensure that the matter is promptly reported to their supervisor, an appropriate College official and/or the Risk Manager. Such employees are charged with exercising appropriate judgment in determining which matters can be reviewed under their authority and which matters must be referred to a higher level of management or the Risk Manager. Consulting with supervisors, the Risk Manager or other appropriate College management is encouraged to err on the side of upward reporting. Oral reports should normally be documented by the supervisor by a written transcription of the oral report, and internal communications regarding allegations of improper activities should normally be in writing.

2. Managers, administrators and employees in supervisory roles shall report to the Risk Manager any allegations of suspected improper activities— whether received as a protected disclosure, reported by their subordinates in the ordinary course of performing their duties, or discovered in the course of performing their own duties—when any of the following conditions are met:

  • The matter involves a significant threat to the health and safety of employees and/or the public;
  • The matter involves allegations or events that have a significant possibility of being the result of a criminal act (e.g., disappearance of cash);
  • The matter involves the misuse of College resources or creates exposure to a liability in potentially significant amounts;
  • The matter is the result of a significant internal control or policy deficiency that is likely to exist at other units within the institution or across the College system;
  • The matter is likely to receive media or other public attention; or
  • The matter is judged to be significant or sensitive for other reasons.
C.   Reporting to the Office of the President and Others
  1. The Risk Manager shall have principal responsibility for meeting the reporting requirements to the Office of the President and senior management. The Risk Manager shall consult with members of the Investigations Workgroup (see Section D.) as necessary in fulfilling this reporting responsibility and will inform the Investigations Workgroup of all reports made to the President.

2. In some instances, even an allegation of improper activity may be reportable to a funding entity or regulatory agency. More typically, at least preliminary investigation results are needed to assess reporting obligations to parties outside the College. The Risk Manager, in consultation with the leadership of the affected area, will determine the nature and timing of such communications.

3. Allegations of suspected losses of money, securities or other property shall be reported to the Senior Vice President of Finance and Administration as soon as it is discovered. The Senior Vice President of Finance and Administration shall report such matters in accordance with the terms of any contracts with insurance or bonding companies.

 4. In the event that any person with a reporting obligation under this policy believes that there is a conflict of interest on the part of the person to whom the allegations of suspected improper activities are to be reported, the next higher level of authority shall receive the report.

5. Whistle Blowers frequently make their reports in confidence. To the extent possible within the limitations of law and policy and the need to conduct a competent investigation, confidentiality of Whistle Blowers will be maintained. Whistle Blowers should be cautioned that their identity may become known for reasons outside of the control of the investigators or College administrators. Similarly, the identity of the subject(s) of the investigation will be maintained in confidence with the same limitations.

D.   Investigating Alleged Improper activities
  1. A number of functional units within the College have responsibility for routinely conducting investigations of certain types of allegations of improper activities, and have dedicated resources and expertise for such purposes. In addition, other College parties may become involved in investigations of matters based on their areas of oversight responsibility or topical expertise.

2. The Risk Manager chairs the Workgroup. Workgroup membership should include representatives from each functional unit that has routine responsibility for certain types of investigations. The Workgroup is composed of the Risk Manager, Director of Human Resources, Director of Public Safety and the Chair of the Faculty Council. In addition, specialized expertise may be required on an ad hoc basis for investigation of certain matters.

3. The College establishes an Investigations Workgroup to ensure coordination and proper reporting of investigations. The Workgroup, acting in an advisory role, shall assist the Risk Manager in assessing the planned course of action related to allegations and investigations, including determining that an adequate basis exists for commencing an investigation.

4. The Workgroup’s responsibilities include:

  • Assisting the Risk Manager in assuring that the proper investigative channels are utilized according to appropriate expertise and jurisdiction;
  • Assuring that all appropriate administrative and senior officials are apprised of the allegations as necessary;
  • Assuring appropriate written reporting occurs to the Office of the President, regulatory agencies, Whistle Blowers and others as necessary or provided by this policy;
  • Assisting the Risk Manager in ensuring appropriate resources and expertise are brought to bear to cause the timely and thorough review of reports of allegations of suspected improper activities;
  • Ensuring that there are no conflicts of interest on the part of any party involved in specific investigations;
  • Coordinating and facilitating communications across investigative channels as necessary to ensure comprehensive attention to all facets of the matter;
  • Assisting the Controller in monitoring significant elements and progress of investigations to ensure that allegations are timely and thoroughly addressed; and
  • Coordinating and facilitating in an advisory capacity the corrective and remedial action that may be initiated in accordance with applicable faculty or staff conduct and disciplinary procedures.

5. The purpose and authority of the Workgroup shall not be construed as to limit or halt investigations undertaken with proper authority granted by law or policy to any College investigative authority. Nor is the Workgroup empowered to initiate investigations without an adequate basis. Rather, the Workgroup’s purpose is to provide guidance, advice and/or coordination for investigative activities as requested by the Controller and to facilitate communications among appropriate parties as requested by the Controller.

6. All employees of the College have a duty to cooperate with investigations initiated under this policy.

7. Consistent with applicable personnel policies and the approval of Human Resources, an employee may be placed on an administrative paid leave, as appropriate, when it is determined by the College that such a leave would serve the best interests of the employee, the College or both. Such a leave is not to be interpreted as an accusation or conclusion of guilt or innocence of any individual including the person on leave. The appropriate Vice President and the Office of Human Resources shall be consulted regarding any plan to place an employee on such a leave.

 

Employee Conduct and Disciplinary Action

 

Washington College (“the College”) provides computing facilities, an environment that encourages the sharing of information and access to local, national, and international information. The College provides its network, computing facilities, information databases, and Campus-wide information system in support of its academic mission and its administrative functions.

Within this document Washington College Information Technologies Resources (“WC IT Resources”) include, but are not limited to: all computer systems and software, interconnecting communications lines and hardware that are the property of Washington College, hardware that is privately owned when it is connected to the WC voice and/or data networks, all Internet Protocol (IP) addresses that are in the Washington College domain, the server computers and network systems, and voice and data networks provided by the College. Also included are the hardware and software associated with these systems and the information managed by these systems.

Approved uses of the WC IT Resources include, but are not limited to, educational applications, authorized electronic communications, administrative information exchange, presentation and promotion of the College to external audiences, research, faculty/staff professional development, and College-sponsored community outreach.

The following guidelines apply to ALL users of the WC IT Resources, including ALL of the Web and information servers operating on the Washington College Network. Infractions of these guidelines are to be reported to the Chief Information Officer for investigation and referral to the appropriate officers of the College. If one feels threatened, for example, by someone stalking or harassing by email or other technological means, immediately contact Public Safety.

User Guidelines and Policies

Use of WC IT Resources is a privilege, not a right. The WC IT Resources may not be used in any manner prohibited by federal, state, or local law or disallowed by licenses, contracts or College regulations, including (but not limited to) general College policies contained in the Faculty Handbook, the Student Handbook, and the Staff Manual.

Legitimate use of WC IT Resources is limited to those persons who have all of the following: proper authorization, a NetworkID (NetID), and a valid password to use the resources. Authorization to use any WC IT Resource is granted by the owner of the particular resource. Use of WC IT Resources is further limited by restrictions set forth in College policy.  Legitimate use does not extend to whatever an individual is capable of doing with a College IT resource. Although some rules are built into the system itself, those restrictions cannot limit completely what an individual can do or can see. In any event, each member of the community is responsible for his/her actions whether or not specific rules are built in, and whether or not the rules can be circumvented.

Academic or administrative use of WC IT Resources always takes precedence over recreational and non-institutional use.

Washington College email is the property of the college. There should be no expectation of complete email privacy. Administrators will have access to an email account in the event of a legal subpoena, if an employee is terminated for cause, or for investigations of misconduct. Supervisors may request access, from the CIO or designee, to an employee’s email if the employee is on an extended absence as determined by Human Resources.

For confidentiality and personal privacy reasons personal email should be conducted on an outside account, such as Gmail, Hotmail, or any of the many other free email services.

Members of the College community, as defined in the College’s email policy, are expected to follow certain principles of behavior in making use of WC IT Resources. In particular they are to respect and to observe policies and procedures governing the Resources.

College community members must respect the privacy of, or other restrictions placed upon, data or information stored or transmitted across computers and network systems, even when data or information resources are not securely protected.

Violations of this policy section include, but are not limited to:

1.   accessing, or attempting to access, data or information from any system, e.g., e- mail, LDAP, Datatel, a personal computer, without proper authorization regardless of the means by which this access is attempted or accomplished;

2.   disseminating in any form, to an entity, data or information obtained from any system regardless of whether or not one is authorized to access said data or information;

3.   giving someone else the means to access data or information that he or she is not authorized to access;

4.   providing your own password, obtaining, sharing, using, or attempting to use passwords or other information that pertain to someone else’s account;

5.   without proper authorization: inspecting, modifying, distributing, copying, or attempting to do so, data, mail, messages, or software;

6.   tapping or monitoring phone or data lines; or

7.   accessing files by circumventing privacy, security, or other legal restrictions.

College community members must comply with the laws governing legally licensed software or shareware software, copyrighted materials, or other assets pertaining to computers or network systems, even when such software or assets are not securely protected.

Violations of this policy section include, but are not limited to:

1.   making more copies of software than the license allows;

2.   duplicating someone else’s copy of proprietary software;

3.   inspecting, modifying, distributing, or copying data or software without proper authorization, or attempting to do so;

4.   giving another individual the means by which to inspect, modify, distribute, or copy proprietary data or software; or

5.   stealing network or phone services.

The United States Department of Education’s document number DCL: GEN-10-08 addresses penalties for copyright infringement include civil and criminal penalties.

Specifically, anyone who is found liable for civil copyright infringement may be ordered to pay either actual damages or “statutory” damages of not less than $750 nor more than $30,000 per work infringed. For information on other fees that might be assessed see Title 17, United States Code,Sections 504 and 505.

College community members must respect the finite capacity of computers or network systems by limiting use of computers and network systems so as not to interfere unreasonably with the activity of other users.

Violations of this policy section include, but are not limited to:

1.   knowingly tampering with, obstructing, or impairing the availability of WC IT Resources, using excess bandwidth, or attempting to do so;

2.   knowingly sending a crippling amount of data around a network; introducing damaging, self-propagating, or otherwise harmful software (such as computer viruses or worms) into a computer or a network;

3.   hoarding computer or network resources in ways that interfere with the operation of WC IT Resources.

4.   removing or modifying computer or network equipment or software without proper authorization, or attempting to do so;

5.   opening the College network to outside access by any means, for example by the connection of a personal wireless network access point;

6.   altering WC IT Resources’ equipment or software; or

7.   altering telecommunications wiring, telephone sets, or associated equipment.

College community members must respect other policies, rules, or procedures established to manage computers or network systems, including those established to control access to, or the use of, computer data, files, or other information.

Violations of this policy include, but are not limited to:

1.   using WC IT Resources without proper authorization or for unauthorized purposes, or attempting to do so;

2.   using WC IT Resources to violate College, local, state, or federal regulations;

3.   using copyrighted materials on WC IT Resources without the required authorization;

4.   posting pictures, video, audio, or personal information of or about a person or persons on a computer system without the express permission of the subject(s);

5.   posting or displaying material that is libelous or harassing in nature;

6.   supplying false or misleading information or identification in order to access WC IT Resources, or attempting to do so;

7.   deliberately trying to log on to an account that you are not authorized to use;

8.   sending electronic mail, messages, or facsimile transmissions in a threatening or harassing manner or using campus phones to harass or threaten others;

9.   using WC IT Resources for commercial purposes, political campaigning unrelated to academic or co-curricular activities, or any activity that would jeopardize the College’s tax exempt status;

10. establishing of any type of network service, e.g. Web servers or music servers, not authorized by the College’s Chief Information Officer; or

11. using campus phones for fraudulent purposes.

Violations

In the event of violations of the provisions of this document, the Chief Information Officer may immediately terminate all services accessible through the use of the violator’s WC Network ID.  Violators of College policies may be referred to the Washington College Honor Board and/or the employee’s supervisor for appropriate disciplinary action. Violators may also be subject to prosecution under local, state, and federal laws. Any decision to terminate service may be appealed to the President’s Office.

 

Terms and Conditions Governing the Use of Washington College Network IDs

A WC NetworkID (User Name) provides access to a variety of facilities and services managed by Washington College Information Technologies. Any use of a WC Network ID constitutes acceptance of the terms and conditions in this document. The College reserves the right to modify the provisions of this document and will announce all such modifications in appropriate College publications.

The facilities and services accessible by a WC Network ID will vary over time depending on changes in WC’s IT Resources and depending on the user’s relationship with the College. Some examples of these facilities and services are electronic mail, research databases, as well as access to certain information from the College’s databases, such as viewing grades. In addition, many College administrative systems rely on the WC Network ID and passwords for security and access.

Once an individual is granted access to data, that person is responsible for maintaining the security and confidentiality of that data.

Authorized Use

Use of a WC Network ID is subject to the following limitations:

1.   WC Network IDs may not be used for the solicitation of business, to conduct business, political campaigning unrelated to academic or co-curricular activities, candidate endorsement or illegal activities;

2.   Outside resources directly or indirectly accessed using a WC Network ID may have their own regulations or restrictions. It is the responsibility of the WC Network ID user to be aware of these regulations or restrictions, and abide by them;

3.   The sharing of a WC Network ID is prohibited.  Users are responsible for any consequences arising from the use of their WC Network ID directly or indirectly attributable to their actions.

Violations

In the event of violations of the provisions of this document, the Chief Information Officer may immediately terminate all services accessible through the use of the violator’s WC Network ID.  Violators of College policies may be referred to the Washington College Honor Board and/or the employee’s supervisor for appropriate disciplinary action. Violators may also be subject to prosecution under local, state, and federal laws. Any decision to terminate service may be appealed to the President’s Office.

Limitation of Liability

Although Washington College tries to provide a stable and accurate computing environment, from time to time hardware and/or software errors may arise. The College does not warrant the accuracy of its computers, network systems, documentation, or advice and consultation. Neither Washington College nor or any of its agents shall be liable for any incidental or consequential damages, even if advised of the possibility thereof. In no event shall Washington College or any of its agents be liable for failure to deliver WC IT Resources’ services.

No animals may be kept by employees on campus, other than those approved by the administration for medical or academic purposes. For health and sanitation reasons, animals are not permitted in residence halls or other College buildings or at official College functions at any time. This policy applies to all members of the College community.  This policy does not apply to trained assistance dogs that are actively engaged in the service for which they are trained. 

If you see an employee with an animal on campus please contact public safety. If suspected violations are taking place, please report to your supervisor.

Washington College relies on the good judgment of its employees to dress in good taste in a manner fitting and proper for the performance of the employee’s work duties. The College recognizes that appropriate dress is a function of the type of work performed by the employee. For example, the dress standards for employees working with the public or in view of the public may be more stringent than those standards applied to employees not working with the public. Employees in certain departments are required to wear uniforms for safety and identification purposes. Employees are to dress consistent with the standards articulated at each work site by the department director or supervisor.

The College, in its sole discretion, will determine when clothing does not meet these requirements.  Good personal hygiene is also important in terms of our customers’ favorable opinion and in terms of your respect for your fellow employees.  Accordingly, employees are expected to come to work in a clean condition.

Employees should not bring children to work during normal working hours (Monday-Friday 8:30a.m.-4:30p.m.), during their assigned shift, or at any time that could disrupt College activities or be unsafe for a child. Parents should make necessary child care arrangements for their children. 

If suspected violations are taking place, please report to your supervisor or to Human Resources.

 All employees should be aware of their responsibilities to protect information contained in educational, financial and employment records. The unauthorized access to, modification, deletion, or disclosure of such information may compromise the integrity of the College and violate individual rights of privacy, and/or constitute a criminal act. All employees are required to sign a confidentiality agreement.
 Employees must avoid actual or apparent conflicts of interest, defined as using their position at the College for personal or financial gain for themselves or their family members. Potential conflicts may include soliciting business for personal gain, accepting employment or payment from a customer or vendor, accepting gifts other than those of $50.00, and/or requesting favors, discounts, or services. Senior Staff are required to affirm that they do not have a potential conflict of interest annually.
 1. POLICY STATEMENT

Washington College’s educational mission is promoted by professionalism in student-faculty relationships and in supervisor/supervisee relationships. Professionalism is fostered by an atmosphere of mutual trust and respect in accordance with established standards of conduct. Taking note of the respect and trust accorded a staff or faculty member by a student and a supervisor by a supervisee, the faculty and staff recognize that they are presumed to make decisions regarding their relationships with students and supervisees which will not endanger this atmosphere of mutual trust and respect. Faculty and staff should be aware of the possibility that an apparent consensual relationship with a student or supervisee may be interpreted (either now or at a later date) as non-consensual and, therefore, as sexual harassment. The power differential inherent in employee/student and supervisor/supervisee relationships may compromise the student’s or supervisee’s freedom to decide and call into question the consensual nature of the relationship. The potential exists for the student or supervisee to perceive coercion in suggestions involving activities outside those appropriate to professional relationships. Moreover, faculty and staff, particularly in relationships with students and persons under their supervision, need to be aware of potential conflicts of interest, perceptions of favoritism and the possible compromise of their evaluative / supervisory capacity. They also need to be aware that a relationship may give rise to a perception that the evaluative capacity of the faculty member or supervisor has been compromised. For the reasons outlined in this policy, the college strongly discourages these relationships.

A. It is a violation of this policy for a faculty or staff member to undertake an amorous relationship or permit one to develop with a student or supervisee who is enrolled in the person’s class or is subject to that person’s supervision or evaluation, even when both parties appear to have consented to the relationship.

B. Amorous relationships between students and faculty or staff members outside the instructional and supervisory context are also strongly discouraged.

C. The College recognizes that consensual amorous relationships may exist prior to the time a student becomes a member of the faculty member’s class or is placed in a situation where the faculty or staff person must supervise or evaluate the student. It is also recognized that such a relationship may exist between co-employees prior to the time when one of those employees becomes the supervisor of the other. An amorous relationship is a recent amorous relationship if it is ongoing or has been in existence at any time within the six (6) months immediately preceding the assignment of the student or supervisee to the faculty or staff member. Where the faculty or staff member has, or has had, a recent amorous relationship with the student or supervisee the following procedures shall be followed:

1) If, at all possible, the student should be advised in his or her course selections to avoid course sections taught by the instructor with whom the student has or has had a recent consensual relationship. Efforts should likewise be made to place a subordinate under the supervision of another supervisor where the supervisor has or has had a recent consensual amorous relationship with the subordinate.

2) In the event it is not possible for the student to avoid the class taught by the faculty member or for the supervisee to avoid the supervision of the supervisor, the faculty member shall advise his or her department chair and Provost, and the supervisor shall advise his or her supervisor of the present or recent consensual amorous relationship and the following steps shall be taken in regards to students:

a. The department head shall appoint another instructor to evaluate the student’s written work, such as essays, research papers, essay tests, care plans, etc.

b. The department head shall appoint another instructor to evaluate the student’s non-written work or performance such as artistic performances, teaching practice or clinical practice.

c. When an appropriate instructor is not available to evaluate the student’s work, the department chair or Provost will provide an alternative solution at no expense to the College.

d. A student should not be assigned to a faculty advisor with whom that student has or has had a recent consensual amorous relationship. The faculty advisor should request that the student be reassigned.

The following steps will be taken in regards to employees:

e. A supervisor will request that his or her supervisor evaluate the supervisee and if such evaluation is not available, he or she will request that a supervisor of a related department evaluate the employee.

f. The supervisor will remove himself or herself from the consideration of the employee for promotion, hiring or determination of salary.

g. When an appropriate supervisor is not available to supervise the employee then the President in consultation with the Director of Human Resources decide if suitable supervision can be arranged or if one of the parties will be asked to resign.

3)  A faculty or staff member who fails to follow the policy set forth in No. 2 above, and does not withdraw from participation in activities or decisions which may reward or penalize a student or supervisee with whom the faculty or staff member has or has had a recent consensual amorous relationship in accordance with this policy will be in violation of this policy and is subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment.

4) Persons who are married, or were married, are included within the definition of those persons having, or who have had, a consensual amorous relationship.  Likewise, persons in a domestic partner relationship are included in this policy.

5) A complaint alleging violations of the policy regarding consensual relationships may be filed by any person and directed to the Human Resources Office. Procedures to be followed when complaints occur are those listed in the Sexual Harassment Policy.

 

Disciplinary and corrective action is a process to help employees overcome poor job performance, strengthen work performance and achieve success.  In the case of minor  work performance problems a private discussion between the supervisor and the employee is the  first  step  in the  positive  discipline procedure.  The  supervisor should  specify  the  job performance  or  conduct that  is  not  acceptable and  the  actions necessary to  correct  the performance problem.  The supervisor should begin with a personal agreement with the employee along with a follow up email or document regarding the discussion.

In instances of serious poor job performance or of repeated minor performance issues, written notice will be given to the employee and made part of the employee’s permanent personnel record that is maintained by Human Resources. Failure  by  an employee  to be responsive  to such  written warnings will  lead  to  further  disciplinary  action including suspension  without pay  and/or discharge.

In the case of alleged serious misconduct, the employee will be suspended immediately (with pay) and required to leave the campus. Serious misconduct generally includes behavior or actions that could threaten the physical or mental well-being of members of the College community or the reputation or standing of the College. Following  an incident that involves alleged serious misconduct,  the  immediate  supervisor,  the  department  director,  and  the  Director  of  Human Resources will discuss the alleged misconduct and develop an appropriate action plan.

The action plan should include an investigation and interview(s) with the appropriate personnel. All meetings, findings, and outcomes will be documented in the employee’s personnel record that is maintained by Human Resources.  Violation of these or similar rules may lead to discipline, up to and including immediate termination.  Please refer to the Discharge section of the Termination of Employment policy.

The employee will be given the opportunity to see any written notices reporting disciplinary actions or any evaluations in his/her personnel file. If the employee feels that the disciplinary action is unfair, he/she may file a grievance.  Please refer to Grievance process policy.

Policy Statement on Discrimination

Washington College does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, color, national or ethnic origin, age, religion, marital status, disability, sexual orientation gender identity, gender expression, genetic information, or other legally protected classification in the administration of any of its educational programs and activities or with respect to admission and employment.

The designated coordinator to ensure compliance with Title IX of the Educational Act Amendments of 1972 is Candace Wannamaker, Associate Vice President of Student Affairs and Title IX Coordinator, Casey Academic Center, Washington College, 300 Washington Avenue, Chestertown, Maryland, 21620, phone number (410) 778-7752.

The designated coordinator to ensure compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 is, Andrea Vassar, Director of Academic Skills, Clifton Miller Library, Washington College, 300 Washington Avenue, Chestertown, Maryland, 21620, phone number (410) 778-7883.

For additional information and/or to file a complaint contact the Director of Civil Rights, US Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights, The Wanamaker Building, 100 Penn Square East, Suite 515, Philadelphia, PA 19107, or local fair employment practices agencies.

 


Policy Statement on Harassment

Harassment in any form, whether based on race, sex, color, national or ethnic origin, age, religion, marital status, disability, sexual orientation, genetic information, or any other legally protected classification is unacceptable on the Washington College campus.

For purposes of this policy harassment means unwelcome verbal, written, or physical conduct based on a protected classification (race, color, sex, disability, etc.) that has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work or education, (including living conditions, extracurricular activities, and social life) creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment, or constituting a threat to an individual’s personal safety. Sexual harassment includes sexual violence/assault.


Policy Statement on Sexual Harassment

Washington College will not tolerate sexual harassment in any form. Sexual harassment includes sexual violence/assault/misconduct. The goal of this policy is to create a community free of sexual harassment. Sexual harassment committed in connection with any College program, whether on or off campus, is prohibited. This applies to academic, educational, extracurricular, athletic, residential, and other College programs. Sexual harassment may be a violation of state and federal laws as well as a violation of this policy. Individuals who feel they have been sexually harassed may have the right to bring legal action, in addition to making a complaint to the College. Legal action and an internal complaint can be pursued at the same time. Retaliation against an individual who brings a complaint, participates in an investigation of sexual harassment, or pursues legal action is prohibited.

The essential importance of academic freedom is recognized and a standard of reasonableness will guide the College. Only when academic freedom is used to disguise, or as the vehicle for, prohibited conduct will it be questioned.

Washington College believes that ideas, creativity, and free expression thrive and, indeed, can only exist for students, faculty, and staff in an atmosphere free of sexual harassment and assault.

Definition of Sexual Harassment

Federal Law (Title VII of the Civil Rights Law of l964 and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972) provides that sexual harassment shall be considered a form of gender discrimination. Maryland Law also prohibits gender discrimination and sexual harassment.

Sexual harassment is defined as any unwelcome sexual advance, request for sexual favors, or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature which has the purpose or effect of interfering with one’s academic or work performance or social world by creating an intimidating, hostile, offensive, or violent environment. Sexual violence/assault is also considered sexual harassment.

Examples of Sexual Harassment:
  • Action of an individual in a position of institutional power or authority who misuses that position to subject an individual to unwanted sexual attention of either a verbal or physical nature when that conduct is either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of a person’s employment or academic status.
  • Demanding sexual favors accompanied by implied or overt threats or promises concerning grades, recommendations, or evaluations.
  • Inappropriate sexual conduct that interferes with an individual’s work performance or educational experience by creating an uncomfortable environment. This prohibition applies to all relationships at the institution between members of the College community.
  • Inappropriate conduct against an individual that interferes with an individual’s work performance or educational experience by creating an uncomfortable environment that would not occur but for the sex of the individual.

Consensual Relationships

Washington College policies prohibit unreciprocated and unwelcome relationships. However, persons in positions of power, authority, and control over others should be aware of and sensitive to problems that may arise from mutual relationships that are inherently unequal. Individuals in these situations are urged to examine such relationships before engaging in them, especially in terms of emotional health, self-esteem, and respect for the freedom of others.

Apparently consensual sexual relationships, particularly those between individuals of unequal status, may be or become a violation of this policy. Anyone who engages in a sexual relationship with a person over whom he or she has any degree of power or authority must understand that the validity of the consent involved can and may be questioned. The College particularly abhors the abuse potentially inherent in sexual relationships between faculty members and students and between staff supervisors and their student employees.


Reporting Discrimination or Harassment

Discrimination or Harassment Based on Disability

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, amended in 2008, prohibits discrimination based on disability. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 prohibits discrimination based on disability in programs or activities receiving federal financial assistance.

Examples of Harassment based on Disability:
  • Lack of access to educational programs and facilities
  • Denial of academic adjustments or accommodations
  • Offensive remarks, jokes, epithets, slurs, negative stereotyping or threatening, intimidating or hostile acts that relate to a person’s disability

Discrimination or Harassment Complaints

Washington College encourages anyone who has experienced any form of discrimination or harassment to report the incident promptly, to seek all available assistance, and to pursue remedies available through campus judicial or grievance processes. Reporting Parties are also encouraged to report incidents to local, state and/or federal authorities or offices charged with handling unlawful discrimination or harassment.

Reporting a Complaint

Students, employees, or third parties who believe they have been subjected to discrimination or harassment, including sexual violence/assault, by a student or employee of the Washington College community or by another individual for whom the College is or may be responsible (e.g., applicants for admission or employment, alumni, independent contractors, vendors, recruiters) should contact one of the following persons for assistance with resolving a complaint:

  • Title IX Coordinator or Assistant Coordinator(s) – for matters involving discrimination or harassment based on sex or gender
  • 504 Coordinator or Assistant Coordinator(s) – for matters involving discrimination or harassment based on disability
  • Professional Staff in Student Affairs (Including Resident Area Directors/RADs)
  • Department of Public Safety
  • Human Resources Department

Complaints alleging sexual discrimination or harassment (including sexual assault/violence) should be submitted to Candace Wannamaker, Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and the College’s Title IX Coordinator, first floor Casey Academic Center, 410-778-7752.

Complaints alleging disability discrimination or harassment should be submitted to Andrea Vassar, Director of Academic Skills and the College’s Section ADA/Section 504 Coordinator, Clifton Miller Library, 410-778-7883.

When a Washington College student is the subject of a discrimination or harassment complaint, the matter will be referred to the Honor Board or other appropriate hearing body (see the Washington College Honor Code and Student Judicial System found earlier in this Handbook).

When a Washington College employee or third party is the subject of a formal written complaint, the matter will be reviewed by the Washington College Discrimination Dispute Resolution Committee (DDRC).

Students, employees, or third parties alleging discrimination or harassment may submit a complaint in writing using the Discrimination/Harassment complaint form. Complaint forms are available in Public Safety, Student Affairs, Human Resources and Title IX Coordinator’s Office or for download and printing from the College website at http://www.washcoll.edu/title-ix/.

Interim Measures

The Title IX Coordinator or 504 ADA Coordinator will determine, with campus administrators, the appropriate interim measures to be taken during the investigation. Interim remedial actions can include, but are not limited to the following:

No Contact Orders Interim Suspension Administrative Leave (Employee) Reassignment of Housing Reassignment of Job Class Schedule Change Prohibit or restrict participation in extracurricular activities Prohibit or restrict access to campus for third parties Relocation of a residential assignment

Investigating a Complaint

All complaints of harassment or discrimination will be investigated in a manner that is adequate, reliable, and impartial. Investigations may be conducted by trained Public Safety staff, trained Title IX Investigators, the Title IX Coordinator or Assistant Coordinators (for Title IX matters), the Section 504 Coordinator or Assistant Coordinators (for ADA/Section 504 related matters), Human Resources staff, or another trained investigator appropriate to the situation and in accordance with all College policies and legal requirements.

For matters involving discrimination or harassment based on sex or gender (covered by Title IX), the Title IX Coordinator will ensure that the investigation complies with all Title IX requirements. For matters involving discrimination or harassment based on disability (covered by ADA/Section 504), the Section 504 Coordinator will ensure the investigation complies with all Section 504 requirements.

The responsibility to conduct an investigation shall not be altered by the fact that a criminal investigation of the incident is pending or has been concluded, although the investigation may be delayed or suspended at the request of law enforcement while the law enforcement agency is gathering evidence. In the event the investigation is delayed at request of law enforcement agency, appropriate steps will be taken to provide for the safety of the Reporting Party and the College community and to prevent retaliation by any individual. The steps may include changes to the schedule, housing assignment or work location of the Responding Party or summary suspension/leave from the College issued to the Responding Party. The College will promptly resume its Title IX investigation as soon the College receives notification that law enforcement has completed the evidence-gathering process.

Investigation Process:

The Reporting Party will be contacted by a College administrator designated by the Title IX Coordinator or ADA/Section 504 Coordinator to schedule a meeting. During the meeting, the College administrator will:

Provide Reporting Party with an explanation of the campus conduct process. Give the Reporting Party the opportunity to submit a written statement and evidence. Give the Reporting Party the opportunity to list any witnesses who may have information pertaining to the complaint. Inform the Reporting Party to have no contact with the Responding Party during the course of the investigation. Inform the Reporting Party that there will be follow-up meetings to discuss the case and status.

The Responding Party will be contacted by a College administrator designated by the Title IX Coordinator or Section 504/ADA Coordinator to schedule a meeting.

During the meetings, the College administrator will:

  • Provide Responding Party with an explanation of the campus conduct process.
  • Present the allegations and provided the Responding Party the opportunity to respond.
  • Give the Responding Party the opportunity to submit a written statement and evidence to contest the allegations.
  • Give the Responding Party the opportunity to list any witnesses who may have information pertaining to the complaint.
  • Inform the Responding Party to have no contact with the Reporting Party during the course of the investigation. Inform the Responding Party that there will be follow-up meetings to discuss the case and status.

Any person identified by the Reporting Party or Responding Party who has information that pertains to the allegation will be contact by the investigator(s).

The person designated to conduct the investigation shall prepare a written report within fifteen (15) business days after completing the investigation, unless additional time to complete the investigation is required. In that case, the investigator shall report on the status of the investigation to the Reporting Party, the Responding Party, and the Title IX or Section 504 Coordinator (or designee) as applicable at the expiration of the fifteen (15) day period and every fifteen (15) business days thereafter.

At the conclusion of the investigation, a designated College administrator will meet with the Reporting Party and discuss the written report and inform him/her of the next steps in the process.

The designated college administrator will contact the Responding Party and review the written report and explain the next steps in the process.

The Reporting Party and Responding Party may have a support person present during the investigation process. A support person is defined as a member of the College community (faculty, staff, or student). The support person is not permitted to participate in the meetings, but is there in support of the individual.

The written report is a summary of the investigation and will be forwarded to the appropriate administrator. The administrator will then forward the report to the Honor Board or the Discrimination Complaint Review Committee (DDRC) for review and any action deemed appropriate in accordance with the procedures of each.

Nothing in these procedures or in the procedures of the Honor Board or DDRC limits the right of any person to pursue other avenues of recourse which may include filing charges or a complaint with local, state and federal authorities responsible for addressing unlawful discrimination and harassment.

More information about the procedures of the Honor Board can be found in the chapter “Washington College Honor Code and Student Judicial System” found earlier in this Handbook.

Resolving Complaints

The Title IX Coordinator or Section 504 Coordinator or other appropriate College administrator will ensure that steps are taken to address and resolve any instance where an investigation and subsequent review (by either the Honor Board or the DDRC) concluded discrimination or harassment occurred. Resolution outcomes include actions to remediate the instance of discrimination or harassment and, where needed, actions to prevent future recurrence and to correct discriminatory effects on the Reporting Party and others.

Remedial actions include, but are not limited to:

  • College Warning (Except in cases of Sexual Assault/Violence)
  • Suspension/Expulsion
  • Probation Termination of Employment
  • Protection from Retaliation Counseling for the Reporting Party
  • Other steps to address the impact of harassment or discrimination on the Reporting Party, any witnesses and the College community

Discrimination and Dispute Resolution Committee (DDRC)

The Washington College Discrimination Dispute Resolution Committee (DDRC) is used when the subject of a formal written complaint is an employee or third party. The DDRC will consist of faculty and staff, trained to review matters involving discrimination and harassment. A hearing panel will consist of three members of the DDRC and is facilitated by the Director of Human Resources (or designee) for complaints against staff members or Provost (or designee) for complaints against faculty. Hearings where there is a staff Responding Party will include two staff members and one faculty member on the hearing panel. Within 15 days after the hearing, the panel will issue a written decision that includes a review of the information relevant to the case and sanctions assigned if it is found to be “more likely than not” that the subject of the Complaint violated College policy. The DDRC will continue to function whenever the College is open even if classes are not in session.

Records

Records of complaint investigation and any corrective action will be entrusted to the Title IX Coordinator or ADA/Section 504 Coordinator and will be maintained in an electronic system accessible throughout the College on a confidential basis consistent with College’s legal requirements and appropriate legal requests for said documents.

Making an Appeal

The Reporting Party or Responding Party may appeal decisions of the DDRC or Honor Board by submitting a written appeal request within five business days of receiving written notification of the outcome of the hearing. Appeal forms can be downloaded from the following website http://www.washcoll.edu/title-ix/. Only appeals that are based on one or more of the following grounds will be considered for review: 

  • Procedural error(s) that prevented fundamental fairness;
  • New information or evidence that was not available at the hearing;
  • An imposed sanction that is disproportionate to the violation and/or the conduct history of the Responding Party;

Letters of appeal for Honor Board decisions must be sent to the Vice President of Student Affairs (or designee). The Vice President for Student Affairs or designee will determine whether or not the appeal meets the above criteria. If any of the criteria are met, the case will be referred to the appeal board; if the case does not meet at least one of the criteria, there will be no further review. More information on the student appeal process can be found in the Student Handbook. Letters of appeal for DDRC decisions must be sent to the President of the College (or designee). The President of the College (or designee) will determine whether or not the appeal meets the above criteria. If any of the criteria are met, the case will be reviewed and a decision made; if the case does not meet at least one of the criteria, there will be no further review. The appellant(s) and the other party, shall be notified of the outcome of the appeal. All appeals will be conducted in an impartial manner and by an impartial decision-maker.

Retaliation

All members of the Washington College community are advised that retaliation against anyone for filing a complaint of discrimination or harassment or for participating in an investigation of discrimination or harassment is strictly prohibited by law and by College policy.

Confidentiality

All parties involved, especially those charged with carrying out the above policies, are enjoined to work in confidence to the extent legally permissible and practically possible.

In cases of discrimination and harassment, Reporting Parties may also obtain information and/or file a complaint by writing the Director of Civil Rights, US Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights, The Wanamaker Building, 100 Penn Square East, Suite 515, Philadelphia, PA 19107. Such complaints generally must be filed within 180 days.


Policy on Sexual Assault

When sexual misconduct or sexual violence in any form occurs, the standards of the community, and possibly criminal laws, are violated. When reported, the College will deal with these issues in accordance with its policies and procedures and as required by applicable laws. Sexual misconduct committed in connection with any College program, whether on or off campus, is prohibited. This includes all College programs including, but not limited to, academic, educational, extra-curricular, athletic, and residential programs.

Washington College urges individuals who believe they have been sexually assaulted to pursue criminal charges against the person or persons they believe to have committed the sexual assault. A criminal charge and an internal complaint can be pursued at the same time. Retaliation against an individual who brings a complaint, participates in an investigation, or pursues legal action is prohibited and possible violations will be investigated and violations addressed in accordance with College policy and procedures.

In cases of sexual assault or other sexual misconduct, College authorities will inform a Reporting Party of the option of criminal prosecution and medical assistance, as well as the Reporting Party’s rights under the Crime Reporting Party’s Bill of Rights. This includes the right to assistance from the Maryland State Crime Reporting Parties Reparation Board and the Maryland State Office of the Crime Reporting Party Ombudsman. A Reporting Party will also be informed of the right to file a complaint of sexual harassment (which includes sexual assault/violence). Students or employees wishing to file a complaint should follow the procedures outlined in the “Reporting Discrimination and Harassment” section found earlier.

When a Washington College student is the subject of a sexual assault/violence complaint, the individual filing the complaint will be informed about the role of the Honor Board’s Sexual Misconduct Hearing Board in evaluating whether the student who is the subject of the complaint is responsible for violations of College policy (including policies addressing discrimination and harassment). When a Washington College employee or third party is the subject of a sexual assault/violence complaint, the individual filing the complaint will be informed about the role of the D or appropriate administrator in evaluating whether the individual who is the subject of the complaint is responsible for violations of College policy (including policies addressing discrimination and harassment).

College authorities, normally the Director of Public Safety, will notify the Chestertown Police of the sexual assault only at the request of the student or employee filing the complaint and will provide assistance in notifying any other law enforcement authorities or in preserving materials that may be relevant to the internal complaint process. At the direction of the Chestertown Police, College authorities will provide assistance in obtaining, securing, and maintaining evidence for criminal prosecution.

Consent

Definition of Consent

Consent is the equivalent of approval, given freely, willingly, and knowingly, of each participant to each sexual involvement. Consent is an affirmative, conscious decision – indicated clearly by words or actions – to engage in mutually accepted sexual contact. A person engaging in sexual contact by force, threat of force, or coercion has not consented to contact.

Lack of mutual consent is the crucial factor in any sexual misconduct case. Consent to some form of sexual activity does not necessarily constitute consent to another form of sexual activity even within the same initial consensual activity. Consent to past sexual activity does not imply consent to future sexual activity. Consent can be withdrawn at any time. Consent to engage in sexual activity with one person does not imply consent to engage in sexual activity with another. Silence without demonstrating permission does not constitute consent. Consent CANNOT be given if a person’s ability to resist or consent is incapacitated because of a mental illness or physical condition (by alcohol or other drugs, unconsciousness, sleep, or blackout) or if there is a significant age or perceived power differential.

Sexual activity with someone who the Responding Party should know to be, or based on the circumstances should reasonably have known to be, mentally or physically incapacitated (by alcohol or other drugs, unconsciousness, sleep, or blackout) is sexual activity without consent.

Interim Measures

By decision of the President of the College, the Vice President of Student Affairs, or a designee of either, an individual who is the subject of a sexual assault complaint may, without prejudice, be removed from the campus or subjected to other forms of restriction with regard to the Reporting Party, pending formal judicial action or criminal procedures, to avoid additional conflict within the community and/or to protect the safety of members of the College community.

Resources for Victims of Sexual Assault

There are many services established to assist individuals who have been sexually assaulted. Rachel Boyle, Director of Prevention Education and Advocacy, ext. 7277, campus sexual assault response advocates (SARA) or other student affairs staff members (see list below under Education and Training) may be contacted to provide assistance or for any questions.

  • Washington College Health Services, ext. 7261
  • Washington College Counseling Services, ext. 7261
  • “For All Seasons, Inc.” Sexual Assault Crisis Center, 1-800-310-7273 (A 24-hour confidential service that provides counseling, advocacy and support to survivors.)
  • Office of Public Safety, ext. 7810

A member of the Campus Department of Public Safety is available 24 hours a day and 7 days a week to transport the Reporting Party to either hospital listed below if requested. Volunteers from the For All Seasons Sexual Assault Crisis Center are also available to provide counseling and assistance throughout this process.

Two area hospitals have sexual assault response programs in place. Forensic Nurse Examiners are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to provide confidential medical examination, STI and pregnancy prophylactics. The programs work in conjunction with For All Seasons, Inc., to provide advocacy support to victims.

  • University of Maryland Shore Medical Center at Chestertown, 410-778-3300
    (located adjacent to Washington College)
  • University of Maryland Shore Medical Center at Easton 410-822-1000

The Director of Prevention Education and Advocacy, serving as the sexual assault response coordinator, will inform the Reporting Party, at a minimum, of internal complaint options, availability of confidential counseling, mechanisms available to address concerns about physical safety, as well as the possibility of alternative housing assignments or classroom arrangements (where appropriate).


Education and Training

The Office of Prevention Education and Advocacy is responsible for developing and coordinating educational and training programs for students about sexual assault and sexual violence. To address issues of sexual assault and sexual violence proactively, the College will distribute these policies to and provide training for students and employees. In addition, these policies will be communicated at appropriate opportunities in classes, meetings, programs, and publications.

 


Sexual Assault Amnesty Protocol

Washington College encourages the reporting of sexual misconduct. The College recognizes that individuals who have been drinking and/or using drugs (whether use is voluntary or involuntary) at the time that violence, including but not limited to domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, sexual misconduct or sexual assault occurs may be hesitant to report such incidents due to fear of potential consequences for their own conduct. An individual reporting sexual violence to College officials or a bystander reporting such violations, provided that their behavior did not place the health and safety of any person at risk, will not be subject to disciplinary action for violations of alcohol and other drug policies occurring at the time of the sexual misconduct.

Sexual Assault Campus Climate Survey

In compliance with Maryland House Bill 571, Washington College conducted a sexual assault campus climate survey in March of 2016 and will do so every two years.

 People to contact for more information:

  • Sarah Feyerherm, Vice President of Student Affairs, ext. 7752
  • Candace Wannamaker, Associate Vice President for Student Affairs/Title IX Coordinator, ext. 7752
  • Ursula Herz, Associate Dean of Students and Director of Residence Life, ext. 7752
  • Rachel Boyle, Director of Prevention Education and Advocacy and Sexual Assault Response Coordinator, ext. 7277
  • Lisa Marx, Director of Health Services, ext. 7261
  • Miranda Altman, Director of Counseling Services, ext. 7289
  • Jerry Roderick, Director of Public Safety, ext. 7810
  • Sexual Assault Response Advocate (SARA) 410-699-0742
 
 

1. It is the policy of Washington College to maintain a safe and healthful environment for its students and employees. Therefore, university policy prohibits the unlawful use, manufacture, possession, distribution, or dispensing of drugs (“controlled substances” as defined in the Controlled Substances Act, 21 U.S.C. 812) and alcohol on College property or at College activities.

2. Violation of this policy is grounds for disciplinary action—up to and including immediate discharge for an employee. Federal and state laws provide additional penalties for such unlawful activities, including fines and imprisonment (21 U.S.C. 841 et seq.;). Local ordinances also provide various penalties for drug- and alcohol-related offenses. The College is bound to take all appropriate actions against violators, which may include referral for legal prosecution or requiring the individual to participate satisfactorily in an approved drug use or alcohol abuse assistance or rehabilitation program.

3. Employees of the College must notify the College of any criminal drug statute conviction for a violation occurring in the workplace within five days after such conviction. The College is, in turn, required to inform the granting or contracting agency of such violation within ten days of the College’s receipt of notification.

4. To maintain a safe and drug-free environment, Washington College has established procedures to perform screenings for controlled substances and alcohol within areas or positions of employment that affect the public welfare or safety, or where such screenings are required by federal regulations, such as those developed by the Federal Highway Administration and Federal Aviation Administration and the United States Coast Guard. In addition, the Director of Human Resources may authorize screenings where there is reasonable suspicion of drug or alcohol use.  Employees subject to testing for cause will receive a verbal and written explanation of the screening procedures at the time they are referred for drug screening.

5. The drug screening procedures shall identify specifically the positions and locations that will require testing, the conditions under which the screenings will be conducted, and the specific plans for conducting the tests.  Costs of all required screenings will be borne by the department requesting the drug screening.

6. A complete set of the drug screening procedures for employees in positions requiring random drug testing is available for those employees and their supervisors from the human resources office. The procedures discuss the types of screenings, when and how they are to be conducted, and the actions that will be taken by the College should the employee receive a confirmed positive alcohol or drug test.

As a condition of employment, all Washington College staff employees are asked to read and sign the following: Employment Letter, Confidentiality Agreement; Drug, Alcohol, and Firearms Policy; Use of College Property Agreement; Mobile Device Policy. 
Washington College is an equal opportunity employer and, as such, takes affirmative action to insure that applicants for employment are considered, and employees are treated, in compliance with applicable laws and regulations governing equal employment opportunity and non-discrimination in employment on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, age, sex, sexual orientation, disability, handicap, or other factors prohibited by law.
 

Treating employees fairly is a key principle of the employment relationship and a productive workplace. When people work together, however, it is not unusual for conflicts or dissatisfaction to arise.  If there is something about your job that is bothering you, we encourage you to take appropriate action to resolve concerns.   This Grievance Resolution Procedure is designed to assist you.  The Human Resources staff is available to assist when and where needed and appropriate.

Washington College encourages anyone who has experienced any form of discrimination or harassment, including sexual violence, to report the incident promptly, to seek all available assistance, and to pursue remedies available through the College’s Discrimination and Harassment Policies (https://www.washcoll.edu/offices/human-resources/college-policies/discrimination-and-harassment-policies.php).  This Grievance Resolution Procedure is used for work-related concerns other than alleged discrimination or harassment. 

Problem-Solving Conversations

You are strongly encouraged to discuss any work-related problem with your supervisor or the person most directly involved with the problem you are confronting as soon as possible.  Those persons can discuss your concerns with you in an effort to resolve the matter.  If you are uncomfortable speaking with that individual, or if discussions do not resolve the issue, please arrange to talk with a member of the Human Resources Department for further assistance.  The staff of the Human Resources Department is available to assist you in defining your concern and exploring alternative approaches for resolving your problem.  Typically, many problems can be resolved through prompt conversations about the concern.  Human Resources staff may recommend additional problem-solving processes including mediation.

Grievance Process

When work related concerns have not been resolved through Problem-Solving Conversations steps outlined above, and after consultation with Human Resources, the Grievance Process may be used. Only a current or former Washington College employee may bring forward a grievance complaint under this process.  A grievance complaint is defined as an unresolved issue regarding an alleged misapplication or violation of College policy, practice, or procedure, other than harassment or discrimination.  The Grievance Process may not be invoked as an alternative to other established procedures (e.g., regarding faculty tenure and promotion) and the following actions are not grievable: demotion without reduction in pay, suspension with pay, termination of a probationary employee during the introductory period.


Step 1: Submit the grievance Complaint

The charging employee must submit a written statement of the grievance complaint to the Director of Human Resources or designee. The written statement must identify the written policy, procedure or practice alleged to have been violated, the date of the event(s) on which the grievance complaint is based, and the relevant information, including the information which supports the employee’s position.   Finally, the grievance complaint must propose a resolution to the problem.  Human Resources staff is available to assist employees in the preparation of a written grievance.  Grievance complaints ordinarily should be filed no later than 180 calendar days after the event or action that is the subject of the grievance.

If the Director of Human Resources determines that the matter raised in the grievance complaint does not fit the definition of a grievance or that appropriate problem-solving Conversations  have not been attempted prior to filing a grievance complaint, as defined above, the charging employee will be notified of such and the grievance process will be concluded.  A charging employee may appeal a decision of the Director of Human Resources to the Chief of Staff.

The respondent (i.e., the person whose action is the subject of the grievance), after consulting with his or her department head and Human Resources staff, will submit a written answer to the grievance complaint, normally within fifteen (15) working days after the receipt of the grievance complaint, and at the same time submit a copy to the Director of Human Resources.  If the response is not satisfactory to the charging employee, she/he will inform Human Resources staff to proceed to Step 2.

Step 2: Request for Review

Within five (5) working days after receipt of the Step 1 response, the charging employee must submit a written statement to the Director of Human Resources explaining the reasons why he or she is appealing the Step 1 response. The Director of Human Resources will then appoint a grievance panel selected from among the members of the College’s Discrimination and Dispute Review Committee (DDRC), which is appointed by the President in consultation with Staff Council and Administrative Council. The grievance panel will consist of three members of the DDRC and is facilitated by the Director of Human Resources (or designee) for complaints against staff members or Provost (or designee) for complaints against faculty. Hearings where there is a staff Respondent will include two staff members and one faculty member on the hearing panel.  Hearings where there is a faculty Respondent will include two faculty members and one staff member on the hearing panel.The DDRC will continue to function whenever the College is open even if classes are not in session.

At the hearing, the charging employee and the respondent may present statements and also present witnesses and materials in support of his/her position. Any employee who participates in the hearing, whether on his/her own behalf or for a co-worker, will not be subject to retaliatory action.  

Within 15 days after the hearing, the Grievance Panel will issue a written report that includes a review of the information relevant to the case, findings, and recommendations. The report will be shared with the charging employee and the respondent and forwarded to the President.

The President will review the report and may accept, reject, or modify the conclusions and recommendations of the Grievance Committee. The President will forward a written answer to the charging employee, the respondent, and the Director of Human Resources. The decision of the President is final.

 

3. Time Limits

The time limits included in this procedure are designed to support a speedy resolution while providing sufficient time to prepare and present information. Scheduling constraints may impact the time limits and as a result the College, at its discretion, may modify the time limits.

If the College does not extend time limits and an employee does not observe the time limits in any particular step, the grievance will be considered to be ended.

4. Disclaimer

This policy shall not be construed as a contract of employment, and it is subject to change by the college in its discretion without prior notice to employees, as the College deems appropriate.

5. Confidentiality

All parties involved, especially those charged with carrying out the above policies, are expected to maintain confidentiality to the greatest extent practicable. Records pertaining to grievance complaints will be maintained in the Office of Human Resources for three years after the resolution of the complaint, at which time the records will be destroyed.  Records regarding any sanctions imposed  will  be  maintained in  accordance with  normal  personnel records policies, as applicable.

We at Washington College strive to maintain an environment in which learning and growth flourish through individuals’ endeavors and honest intellectual exchanges both in and out of the classroom. To maintain such an environment, each member of the community pledges to respect the ideas, well being, and property of others. Thus, each member of the Washington College community abides by its Honor Code.

The Spirit of the Honor Code

The Washington College Honor Code was established by vote of the faculty and students in 1976 and reaffirmed in 1987. In 1994, the Honor Code was redrafted to reflect student and faculty sentiment that a single code should address both academic and social conduct.

The Washington College Honor Code sets standards for the entire College community. The intention of the Honor Code is to encourage honest academic achievement and the highest standard of social conduct in all members of the institution. Those who agree to this honor system promise to uphold it and abide by it. All students are required to sign the Honor Code upon enrollment at Washington College, signifying that they have read and understand the Honor Code, that they are willing to abide by its principles, and that they understand the sanctions they may incur if they violate the Code.

Further information about the Honor Board hearing process as well as guidelines for student respondents, witnesses and advisors can be found online at: https://www.washcoll.edu/offices/student-affairs/honor-board-andstudent-conduct.

Washington College prohibits the use of College equipment to access, view or store pornographic material in the workplace.  The work place includes offices, common and/or restricted spaces (limited to certain members of the College community) and public spaces (open to all members of the College community).  College equipment includes but is not limited to the College owned network, computers, cell phones, servers, and software or other technological devices capable of displaying visual images. Use of personal devices on the College network to access or view pornographic materials in the workplace is also prohibited.  In addition, viewing pornography on College property or at College events may interfere with a productive work environment and may constitute sexual harassment. 

An employee, including a student employee, who accesses, views or stores pornographic material in the workplace is subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment by Washington College.  If, in the course of their work, OIT personnel discover pornographic material on a College owned computer or other device, the discovery will be reported to Human Resources.  If pornographic material is found on a lab or public access machine, OIT should be contacted to remove the material.

In order for a Washington College’s faculty member or student to access and store pornographic material on a College owned device or server, for the purpose of research or in order to teach specific class topics, the faculty or student must inform the Provost and Dean of the College in writing and receive written permission to proceed. 

In all cases, without exception, child pornographic material will be reported to the appropriate authorities as required by federal law.

Federal law (Title VII of the Civil Rights Law of 1964 and Title IX of the Education

Amendments of 1972) provides that sexual harassment shall be considered a form of sex discrimination.  Maryland Law also prohibits sex discrimination and sexual harassment.

Washington College prohibits sexual harassment of any member of the community – whether faculty, student, or employee – by any person.  Sexual harassment is defined as any unwelcome sexual advance, request for sexual favors, or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature which has the purpose or effect of interfering with one’s academic or work performance or social world by creating an intimidating, hostile, offensive, or violent environment. Sexual violence/assault is also considered sexual harassment.

Harassment in any form, whether based on race, sex, color, national or ethnic origin, age, religion, marital status, disability, sexual orientation, genetic information, or any other legally protected classification, is unacceptable on the Washington College campus.

For purposes of this policy harassment means unwelcome verbal, written, or physical conduct based on a protected classification (race, color, sex, disability, etc.) that has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work or education (including living conditions, extracurricular activities, and social life), creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment, or constituting a threat to an individual’s personal safety. Sexual harassment includes sexual violence/assault.

Washington College will not tolerate sexual harassment in any form. Sexual harassment includes sexual violence/assault. The goal of this policy is to create a community free of sexual harassment. Sexual harassment committed in connection with any College program, whether on or off campus, is prohibited. This applies to academic, educational, extracurricular, athletic, residential, and other College programs. Sexual harassment may be a violation of state and federal laws as well as a violation of this policy. Individuals who feel they have been sexually harassed may have the right to bring legal action, in addition to making a complaint to the College. Legal action and an internal complaint can be pursued at the same time. Retaliation against an individual who brings a complaint, participates in an investigation of sexual harassment, or pursues legal action is prohibited.

The essential importance of academic freedom is recognized and a standard of reasonableness will guide the College. Only when academic freedom is used to disguise, or as the vehicle for, prohibited conduct will it be questioned. Washington College believes that ideas, creativity, and free expression thrive and, indeed, can only exist for students, faculty, and staff in an atmosphere free of sexual harassment and assault.

Examples of sexual harassment:

  1. Action of an individual in a position of institutional power or authority who misuses that position to subject an individual to unwanted sexual attention of either a verbal or physical nature when that conduct is either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of a person’s employment or academic status.
  2. Demanding sexual favors accompanied by implied or overt threats or promises concerning grades, recommendations, or evaluations.
  3. Inappropriate sexual conduct that interferes with an individual’s work performance or educational experience by creating an uncomfortable environment. This prohibition applies to all relationships at the institution between members of the College community.
  4. Inappropriate conduct against an individual that interferes with an individual’s work performance or educational experience by creating an uncomfortable environment that would not occur but for the sex of the individual.

Consensual Relationships

Washington College policies prohibit unreciprocated and unwelcome relationships. However, persons in positions of power, authority, and control over others should be aware of and sensitive to problems that may arise from mutual relationships that are inherently unequal. Individuals in these situations are urged to examine such relationships before engaging in them, especially in terms of emotional health, self-esteem, and respect for the freedom of others.

Apparently consensual sexual relationships, particularly those between individuals of unequal status, may be or become a violation of this policy. Anyone who engages in a sexual relationship with a person over whom he or she has any degree of power or authority must understand that the validity of the consent involved can and may be questioned. The College particularly abhors the abuse potentially inherent in sexual relationships between faculty members and students and between staff supervisors and their student employees.

Employees or third parties, who believe that they have been subjected to discrimination or harassment (including sexual violence/assault) by an employee of the College or by another individual for whom the College is or may be responsible (alumni visiting campus, contract vendors providing a campus service, etc.) should contact one of the following to file a complaint:

Associate Vice President for Student Affairs/Title IX Coordinator

Director of Human Resources

Director of Public Safety

Retaliation

All members of the Washington College community are advised that retaliation against anyone for filing a complaint of discrimination or harassment, including sexual violence/assault is prohibited. Members of the community should be equally aware that knowingly making false allegations of harassment or discrimination is itself a violation of College policy and the individual involved will be subject to disciplinary action.

Resources

There are many services established to assist individuals who have been sexually assaulted. The Student Affairs Office, 410-778-7752, as well as the resources listed below may be contacted to provide assistance or answer any questions.

Washington College Health Services, 410-778-7261


Washington College Counseling Services, 410-778-7261, 7289, or 7826


“For All Seasons, Inc.” Sexual Assault Crisis Center, 1-800-310-7273 (A 24-hour confidential service that provides counseling, advocacy and support to survivors.)


Office of Public Safety, 410-778-7810

Local Emergency, Police, Fire and Ambulance – dial 911 (or 9-911 from a campus phone)

Hospitals

University of Maryland Shore Medical Center at Chestertown, 410-778-3300 – located adjacent to Washington College

Memorial Hospital in Easton, Maryland, 410-822-1000

Employee Resources

Employee Assistance Program (EAP), 866-248-4096

Smoking within the confines of Washington College buildings and vehicles is prohibited. Used smoking materials should be disposed of in an appropriate container and not on the grounds. This policy applies to all employees, students, and visitors.  Please refer to the Code of Conduct for further details. 
 

Social media includes a variety of online tools and services that allow users to publish content and interact with their audiences. Currently, the most common social networks or websites within this rapidly changing media space include Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, Flickr and blogs. Through its institutional social media presence, the College communicates directly with and receives instant feedback from online communities that include students, faculty, staff, alumni, prospective students, families, and friends.

Faculty and professional staff, including supervisory employees, are expected to use good judgment if interacting with students or colleagues via social networking websites, and if posting information about the College or their employment on such sites or blogs. Faculty or staff members who manage social media as representatives of Washington College are responsible for following all normal expectations for professional behavior as representatives of the College.

If your social media presence is representing your Washington College department, group, organization or activity, you are also representing your own professional reputation and the College. Even on your personal site, if you indicate that you are a Washington College faculty or staff member, visitors to the site may perceive that you are speaking for your department or the College. By invoking your professional affiliation with Washington College, it may be hard to contend otherwise if you are not explicit about that fact. With this in mind, employees must not post messages on behalf of Washington College unless doing so is within the scope of their job duties.

The “Appropriate Use Guidelines” listed below provides suggestions on how to use social media in ways that can prevent you from inadvertently affecting your professional reputation or how the College is perceived.

  • Be aware of liability. You are legally liable for what you post on your own site and on the sites of others. Individual bloggers have been held liable for commentary deemed to be proprietary, copyrighted, defamatory, libelous or obscene (as defined by the courts). Employers are increasingly conducting Web searches on job candidates before extending offers. Be sure that what you post today will not come back to haunt you.
  • Be transparent about your role at Washington College. If you participate in or maintain a social media site on behalf of the college, clearly state your role and goals. Strive for accuracy and correct errors quickly. If you have questions about whether it is appropriate to write about certain material, ask your supervisor first.
  • Be Respectful. Be professional and respectful always. Anything you post on a social media site in your role as a Washington College faculty or staff member reflects on you and the College. As such, be careful with your comments and avoid engaging in non-academic arguments or extensive non-academic debates with critics. If a negative post or comment is found online about Washington College or yourself, do not counter with another negative post. Instead, publicly offer to remedy the situation through positive action.  Contact your supervisor for assistance with this issue.
  • Maintain Confidentiality. Do not post confidential or proprietary information about Washington College, its students, its alumni, your fellow employees or yourself. Use good ethical judgment and follow all local, state and federal regulations, such as FERPA and HIPPA and college policies including the Washington College Confidentiality Agreement.
  • Refrain from posting derogatory remarks. Employees are to refrain from posting derogatory, false, inflammatory or harassing comments about students, colleagues or former colleagues, alumni, donors, and trustees. The Acceptable Use Policy for Information Technology Resources prohibits using Washington College’s computing resources to “send transmissions in a threatening or harassing manner.” Employees must adhere to all rules and requirements outlined in the Acceptable Use Policy.
  • Consider your audiences. Social media often span traditional boundaries between professional and personal relationships. Use privacy settings to restrict personal information on otherwise public sites. Choose profile photos and avatars carefully. Be thoughtful about the type of photos you upload.
  • Protect your identity. Don’t provide personal information about yourself or others that scam artists and identity thieves might steal. This includes telephone numbers, mailing addresses, email addresses and copies of personal documents.
  • Protect others’ privacy.  Current and prospective students cannot be required, requested, suggested or compelled to engage with faculty, staff or other College representatives on their personal electronic accounts.  Asking a student to “friend you” on Facebook, suggesting that your student worker provide you access to his/her personal email account, requiring your class members to follow you in Instagram, or requiring student athletes to show you their Snapchat postings are examples of practices that violate state law and the College’s social media policy.  Disciplining or retaliating against a student or prospective student (applicant) for not engaging with faculty, staff or other College representatives via social media also violates state law and the College’s social media policy.
  • Respect college time and property. The Acceptable Use Policy for IT Resources states, “Academic or administrative use of Washington College IT Resources always takes precedence over recreational and non-institutional use.” The college computers and your work time are to be used for college-related educational and business purposes. It’s appropriate to post at work if your comments are directly related to accomplishing work goals, such as seeking sources for information or working with others to resolve a problem. Limited personal use of computing resources is acceptable as long as it doesn’t violate any policies, but for the most part, you must maintain your personal social media sites on your own time. Users should have no expectation of privacy when using College equipment or networks.
  • Think before you post. Whether it’s your personal or a Washington College social networking site, remember that nothing is truly private in social media. Think about your comments, photos or other content before posting. Remember that anything you share, even within closed networks, becomes publicly available information. Your content can be stored and shared globally instantly. If it’s not something that you would share with the mainstream media, don’t post it on your site.

Departments may establish additional guidelines specific to their department, which must be reviewed in advance with the Director of Human Resources.  Supervisors are encouraged to discuss any potential violations of this policy with the Director of Human Resources.  Violation of this policy may result in disciplinary action up to and including termination.

In the interest of maintaining productivity and a proper business environment, employees may not distribute literature or other materials of any kind or solicit for any cause during the working time of any employee involved.  Furthermore, employees may not distribute literature or other material of any kind in working areas, at any time, whether or not the employees are on working time.  Non-employees are prohibited from soliciting or distributing materials to employees on College premises at any time without the prior approval of the Senior Vice President for Finance and Administration. For example, non-working time would be lunch or break and a non-working area would be the break room.  Please refer to the Code of Conduct for further details. 

1. General
Telephones and cell phones are provided for employees for College business. Employees are asked to limit personal calls during work hours. If an employee is found to be making excessive personal calls, he/she will be subject to appropriate disciplinary action.


2. Long-Distance Calls
If an employee uses a College telephone to place a personal long-distance call, he/she is required to place the call from his/her assigned phone and to use the number 3 to access an outside line. A charge will be generated, and the employee will be billed by the College for personal long distance calls.


3. Cell Phone Use
If an employee is issued a cell phone for business purposes, he/she is responsible for understanding and following all of the departmental policies and procedures for the use of the cell phone. Furthermore, it is the employee’s responsibility to protect the cell phone from theft or damage.

 

Washington College (“the College”) provides computing facilities, an environment that encourages the sharing of information and access to local, national, and international information. The College provides its network, computing facilities, information databases, and Campus-wide information system in support of its academic mission and its administrative functions.

Within this document Washington College Information Technologies Resources (“WC IT Resources”) include, but are not limited to:  all computer systems and software, interconnecting communications lines and hardware that are the property of Washington College, hardware that is privately owned when it is connected to the WC voice and/or data networks, all Internet Protocol (IP) addresses that are in the Washington College domain, the server computers and network systems, and voice and data networks provided by the College.  Also included are the hardware and software associated with these systems and the information managed by these systems.

Approved uses of the WC IT Resources include, but are not limited to, educational applications, authorized electronic communications, administrative information exchange, presentation and promotion of the College to external audiences, research, faculty/staff professional development, and College-sponsored community outreach.

The following guidelines apply to ALL users of the WC IT Resources, including ALL of the Web and information servers operating on the Washington College Network.  Infractions of these guidelines are to be reported to the Chief Information Officer for investigation and referral to the appropriate officers of the College.  If one feels threatened, for example, by someone stalking or harassing by email or other technological means, immediately contact Public Safety.

User Guidelines and Policies

Use of WC IT Resources is a privilege, not a right.  The WC IT Resources may not be used in any manner prohibited by federal, state, or local law or disallowed by licenses, contracts or College regulations, including (but not limited to) general College policies contained in the Faculty Handbook, the Student Handbook, and the Staff Manual. 

Legitimate use of WC IT Resources is limited to those persons who have all of the following: proper authorization, a NetworkID (NetID), and a valid password to use the resources.  Authorization to use any WC IT Resource is granted by the owner of the particular resource.  Use of WC IT Resources is further limited by restrictions set forth in College policy.   Legitimate use does not extend to whatever an individual is capable of doing with a College IT resource.  Although some rules are built into the system itself, those restrictions cannot limit completely what an individual can do or can see.  In any event, each member of the community is responsible for his/her actions whether or not specific rules are built in, and whether or not the rules can be circumvented. 

Academic or administrative use of WC IT Resources always takes precedence over recreational and non-institutional use.

Washington College email is the property of the college.  There should be no expectation of complete email privacy.  Administrators will have access to an email account in the event of a legal subpoena, if an employee is terminated for cause, or for investigations of misconduct.  Supervisors may request access, from the CIO or designee, to an employee’s email if the employee is on an extended absence as determined by Human Resources.  For confidentiality and personal privacy reasons personal email should be conducted on an outside account, such as Gmail, Hotmail at Live.com, or any of the many other free email services. 

Members of the College community, as defined in the College’s email policy, are expected to follow certain principles of behavior in making use of WC IT Resources.  In particular they are to respect and to observe policies and procedures governing the Resources.

College community members must respect the privacy of, or other restrictions placed upon, data or information stored or transmitted across computers and network systems, even when data or information resources are not securely protected.

Violations of this policy section include, but are not limited to:

1. accessing, or attempting to access, data or information from any system, e.g., email, LDAP, ellucian Colleague, a personal computer, without proper authorization regardless of the means by which this access is attempted or accomplished;

2. disseminating in any form, to an entity, data or information obtained from any system regardless of whether or not one is authorized to access said data or information;

3. giving someone else the means to access data or information that he or she is not authorized to access;

4. providing your own password, obtaining, sharing, using, or attempting to use passwords or other information that pertain to someone else’s account;

5. without proper authorization:  inspecting, modifying, distributing, copying, or attempting to do so, data, mail, messages, or software;

6. tapping or monitoring phone or data lines; or

7. accessing files by circumventing privacy, security, or other legal restrictions.

College community members must comply with the laws governing legally licensed software or shareware software, copyrighted materials, or other assets pertaining to computers or network systems, even when such software or assets are not securely protected.

Violations of this policy section include, but are not limited to:

1. making more copies of software than the license allows;

a. duplicating someone else’s copy of proprietary software;

b. inspecting, modifying, distributing, or copying data or software without proper authorization, or attempting to do so;

2. giving another individual the means by which to inspect, modify, distribute, or copy proprietary data or software; or

3. stealing network or phone services.

The United States Department of Education’s document number DCL: GEN-10-08 addresses penalties for copyright infringement include civil and criminal penalties.  Specifically, anyone who is found liable for civil copyright infringement may be ordered to pay either actual damages or “statutory” damages of not less than $750 nor more than $30,000 per work infringed.  For information on other fees that might be assessed see Title 17, United States Code, Sections 504 and 505.

College community members must respect the finite capacity of computers or network systems by limiting use of computers, game consoles, “gaming network activities” and network systems so as not to interfere unreasonably with the activity of other users.  No level of user bandwidth is guaranteed. 

Violations of this policy section include, but are not limited to:

1. knowingly tampering with, obstructing, or impairing the availability of WC IT Resources, using excess bandwidth, or attempting to do so;

2. knowingly sending a crippling amount of data around a network; introducing damaging, self-propagating, or otherwise harmful software (such as computer viruses or worms) into a computer or a network;

3. hoarding computer or network resources in ways that interfere with the normal operation of WC IT Resources;

a. removing or modifying computer or network equipment or software without proper authorization, or attempting to do so;

4. opening the College network to outside access by any means, for example by the connection of a personal wireless network access point or Ethernet switch;

5. altering WC IT Resources’ equipment or software; or

6. altering telecommunications wiring, telephone sets, or associated equipment. 

College community members must respect other policies, rules, or procedures established to manage computers or network systems, including those established to control access to, or the use of, computer data, files, or other information.

Violations of this policy include, but are not limited to:
  1. using WC IT Resources without proper authorization or for unauthorized purposes, or attempting to do so;
  1. using WC IT Resources to violate College, local, state, or federal regulations;
  1. using copyrighted materials on WC IT Resources without the required authorization;
  1. posting pictures, video, audio, or personal information of or about a person or persons on a computer system without the express permission of the subject(s);
  1. posting or displaying material that is libelous or harassing in nature;
  1. supplying false or misleading information or identification in order to access WC IT Resources, or attempting to do so;
  1. deliberately trying to log on to an account that you are not authorized to use;
  1. sending electronic mail, messages, or facsimile transmissions in a threatening or harassing manner or using campus phones to harass or threaten others;
  1. using WC IT Resources for commercial purposes, political campaigning unrelated to academic or co-curricular activities, or any activity that would jeopardize the College’s tax exempt status;
  1. establishing of any type of network service, e.g. Web servers or music servers, not authorized by the College’s Chief Information Officer; or
  1. using campus phones for fraudulent purposes.
Violations

In the event of violations of the provisions of this document, the Chief Information Officer may immediately terminate all services accessible through the use of the violator’s WC Network ID.  Violators of College policies may be referred to the Washington College Honor Board and/or the employee’s supervisor for appropriate disciplinary action. Violators may also be subject to prosecution under local, state, and federal laws.  Any decision to terminate service may be appealed to the President’s Office.

Washington College provides its employees with appropriate supplies, facilities and equipment necessary to effectively perform their job duties. Equipment and supplies should not be removed from campus unless it is approved and a work assignment requires use of the College property outside the physical facility of the College.

Employees are encouraged to use College resources prudently and efficiently. Misuse of these resources is regarded as a serious violation of College policy and may lead to disciplinary action. The Code of Conduct policy specifically addresses employees’ responsibility for careful use of College resources. In addition, the College’s Use Policy for Washington College Information Technologies Resources covers the appropriate use of those resources.

Washington College strives to operate in an ethical, honest and lawful manner and expects its employees, students, and third parties doing business with the College to conduct their activities in accordance with College policies and applicable law at all times. 

A culture of compliance strengthens and promotes ethical practices and respectful treatment of all members of the College community and those who conduct business with the College.

The College strongly encourages any employee or student to report suspected or actual wrongful conduct by a College contractor/vendor, student or employee that may include but is not limited to any of the following:

  • violation of state or federal law or regulations;
  • fraud;
  • misappropriation or misuse of College, or government resources (financial or human);
  • action or failure to act that endangers the health or safety of the public, students or employees;
  • abuses of authority; 

Reports may be made to one’s supervisor, in the case of employees, or to the College’s Controller or Director of Human Resources.  There are private telephone lines (without caller identification) for this purpose which cannot be traced without a directive from Public Safety and/or a court order.  The Whistle Blower line can be reached by dialing (855)-209-9562.

No College employee or student may interfere with the good faith reporting of suspected or actual wrongful conduct.  In addition, individuals who make such reports or participate in investigations of reports shall be protected from any retaliation such as harassment, adverse employment actions, or academic or educational consequences.  Violations of the prohibition against retaliation will result in disciplinary action up to and including dismissal.

 A.   Filing a Report

1. Any person may report allegations of suspected violation of College policies or State or Federal laws. Knowledge or suspicion of such behaviors may originate from faculty, staff or administrators carrying out their assigned duties, external auditors, law enforcement, regulatory agencies, and customers, vendors, students or other third parties. Allegations of suspected improper activities may be reported anonymously.

2. Reports of allegations of suspected improper activities are encouraged to be made in writing so as to assure a clear understanding of the issues raised, but may be made orally. Such reports should be factual rather than speculative or conclusory, and contain as much specific information as possible to allow for proper assessment of the nature, extent and urgency of preliminary investigative procedures.

3. The College recommends that any reports by persons who are not College employees be made to the Controller. Such reports may also be made to another College official whom the reporting person may reasonably expect to have either responsibility over the affected area or the authority to review the alleged improper activity on behalf of the College.

4. Normally, a report by an employee of allegations of a suspected improper activity should be made to the reporting employee’s immediate supervisor or other appropriate administrator or supervisor within the operating unit (such as the unit head), or to the Controller. However, in the interest of confidentiality, when there is a potential conflict of interest or for other reasons, such reports may be made to another College official whom the reporting employee may reasonably expect to have either responsibility over the affected area or the authority to review the alleged improper activity on behalf of the College.

5. When a person reports allegations of suspected improper activities to an appropriate authority the report is known as a protected disclosure. The rights of College employees and applicants for employment when making a protected disclosure are covered by the Whistle Blower Policy.

6. All College employees, and especially any academic or staff employee in a supervisory role, should be aware of and alert to either oral or written, formal or informal communications that may constitute a report of allegations of suspected improper activity. Anonymous Whistle Blowers must provide sufficient corroborating evidence to justify the commencement of an investigation. An investigation of unspecified wrong-doing or broad based allegations will not be undertaken without identifiable evidentiary support. Because investigators are unable to interview anonymous Whistler Blowers, it may be more difficult to evaluate credibility of the allegations and therefore, less likely to cause an investigation to be initiated.

B.    Reporting to the Controller
  1. Managers, administrators and employees in supervisory roles who receive a report alleging suspected improper activities shall ensure that the matter is promptly reported to their supervisor, an appropriate College official and/or the Controller. Such employees are charged with exercising appropriate judgment in determining which matters can be reviewed under their authority and which matters must be referred to a higher level of management or the Controller. Consulting with supervisors, the Controller or other appropriate College management is encouraged to err on the side of upward reporting. Oral reports should normally be documented by the supervisor by a written transcription of the oral report, and internal communications regarding allegations of improper activities should normally be in writing.

2. Managers, administrators and employees in supervisory roles shall report to the Controller any allegations of suspected improper activities— whether received as a protected disclosure, reported by their subordinates in the ordinary course of performing their duties, or discovered in the course of performing their own duties—when any of the following conditions are met:

  • The matter involves a significant threat to the health and safety of employees and/or the public;
  • The matter involves allegations or events that have a significant possibility of being the result of a criminal act (e.g., disappearance of cash);
  • The matter involves the misuse of College resources or creates exposure to a liability in potentially significant amounts;
  • The matter is the result of a significant internal control or policy deficiency that is likely to exist at other units within the institution or across the College system;
  • The matter is likely to receive media or other public attention; or
  • The matter is judged to be significant or sensitive for other reasons.
C.   Reporting to the Office of the President and Others
  1. The Controller shall have principal responsibility for meeting the reporting requirements to the Office of the President and senior management. The Controller shall consult with members of the Investigations Workgroup (see Section D.) as necessary in fulfilling this reporting responsibility and will inform the Investigations Workgroup of all reports made to the President.

2. In some instances, even an allegation of improper activity may be reportable to a funding entity or regulatory agency. More typically, at least preliminary investigation results are needed to assess reporting obligations to parties outside the College. The Controller, in consultation with the leadership of the affected area, will determine the nature and timing of such communications.

3. Allegations of suspected losses of money, securities or other property shall be reported to the Senior Vice President of Finance and Administration as soon as it is discovered. The Senior Vice President of Finance and Administration shall report such matters in accordance with the terms of any contracts with insurance or bonding companies.

 4. In the event that any person with a reporting obligation under this policy believes that there is a conflict of interest on the part of the person to whom the allegations of suspected improper activities are to be reported, the next higher level of authority shall receive the report.

5. Whistle Blowers frequently make their reports in confidence. To the extent possible within the limitations of law and policy and the need to conduct a competent investigation, confidentiality of Whistle Blowers will be maintained. Whistle Blowers should be cautioned that their identity may become known for reasons outside of the control of the investigators or College administrators. Similarly, the identity of the subject(s) of the investigation will be maintained in confidence with the same limitations.

D.   Investigating Alleged Improper activities
  1. A number of functional units within the College have responsibility for routinely conducting investigations of certain types of allegations of improper activities, and have dedicated resources and expertise for such purposes. In addition, other College parties may become involved in investigations of matters based on their areas of oversight responsibility or topical expertise.

2. The Controller chairs the Workgroup. Workgroup membership should include representatives from each functional unit that has routine responsibility for certain types of investigations. The Workgroup is composed of the Controller, Director of Human Resources, Director of Public Safety and the Chair of the Faculty Council. In addition, specialized expertise may be required on an ad hoc basis for investigation of certain matters.

3. The College establishes an Investigations Workgroup to ensure coordination and proper reporting of investigations. The Workgroup, acting in an advisory role, shall assist the Controller in assessing the planned course of action related to allegations and investigations, including determining that an adequate basis exists for commencing an investigation.

4. The Workgroup’s responsibilities include:

  • Assisting the Controller in assuring that the proper investigative channels are utilized according to appropriate expertise and jurisdiction;
  • Assuring that all appropriate administrative and senior officials are apprised of the allegations as necessary;
  • Assuring appropriate written reporting occurs to the Office of the President, regulatory agencies, Whistle Blowers and others as necessary or provided by this policy;
  • Assisting the Controller in ensuring appropriate resources and expertise are brought to bear to cause the timely and thorough review of reports of allegations of suspected improper activities;
  • Ensuring that there are no conflicts of interest on the part of any party involved in specific investigations;
  • Coordinating and facilitating communications across investigative channels as necessary to ensure comprehensive attention to all facets of the matter;
  • Assisting the Controller in monitoring significant elements and progress of investigations to ensure that allegations are timely and thoroughly addressed; and
  • Coordinating and facilitating in an advisory capacity the corrective and remedial action that may be initiated in accordance with applicable faculty or staff conduct and disciplinary procedures.

5. The purpose and authority of the Workgroup shall not be construed as to limit or halt investigations undertaken with proper authority granted by law or policy to any College investigative authority. Nor is the Workgroup empowered to initiate investigations without an adequate basis. Rather, the Workgroup’s purpose is to provide guidance, advice and/or coordination for investigative activities as requested by the Controller and to facilitate communications among appropriate parties as requested by the Controller.

6. All employees of the College have a duty to cooperate with investigations initiated under this policy.

7. Consistent with applicable personnel policies and the approval of Human Resources, an employee may be placed on an administrative paid leave, as appropriate, when it is determined by the College that such a leave would serve the best interests of the employee, the College or both. Such a leave is not to be interpreted as an accusation or conclusion of guilt or innocence of any individual including the person on leave. The appropriate Vice President and the Office of Human Resources shall be consulted regarding any plan to place an employee on such a leave.

 

Employee Safety and Property

Washington College is committed to the highest ethical and professional standards of conduct as an integral part of its core values of critical thinking, effective communication, and moral courage. To achieve this goal, the College relies on each community member’s ethical behavior, civility, honesty, integrity and good judgment.

The Code of Conduct establishes guidelines for professional conduct by representatives of the College including 1) executive officers, Faculty, Staff and other employees of the College 2) consultants, vendors and contractors when doing business with the College and 3) volunteers. The Code refers to all these persons collectively as “members of the College community” or “community members.”

This Code cannot address all situations that may arise, but it offers a framework to assist community members in understanding the College’s expectations of them. This Code of Conduct supplements but does not supersede any other published College policies such as those contained in the Faculty Handbook and College Policies. Violations of the Code of Conduct may result in disciplinary or corrective action up to and including termination of employments, contractual services, or volunteer services, as applicable.

Respect for Persons

Washington College places a high value on human relations, human diversity and human rights. Consistent with these values, the College strives to maintain a work environment that is characterized by mutual respect for all individuals. Such an environment has no place for harassment or discrimination based on race, color, religion, national origin, age, sex, sexual orientation, disability, and other factors prohibited by law. Such behavior will not be tolerated. As befitting the College’s commitment to its mission, community members are expected to treat one another, students, and the general public in a cordial and respectful manner. For example, the following behaviors are specifically prohibited:

1. Disorderly conduct, including but not limited to using discriminatory, profane, abusive, or threatening language, fighting, provoking a fight, threatening or attempting bodily harm or injury to another on College property or during College activities; or other conduct which threatens or endangers the health, safety, or well-being of a community member, wherever it occurs.

2. Sexual harassment of employees, students, donors, customers, visitors, vendors or any other person on College property or during College activities.

3. Members must not abuse the authority they have been given and care must be taken to ensure that any personal relationships do not result in situations that might interfere with objective judgment. Members should conduct themselves in a businesslike manner on campus or when attending an off-campus work related function. Unprofessional activities such as threatening or intimidating behavior, offensive language, possessing or posting offensive materials in the work area or accessing inappropriate materials on computers are strictly prohibited.

Respect for Property

Members of the College community must be responsible stewards of the College’s resources. Consistent with this value, employees are expected to exercise reasonable care in the use of College property and to report any damage to College property to their supervisors and/or other appropriate College officials. The following activities are specifically prohibited:

1.  Willful or careless damage to College property.

2.  Theft or other dishonesty.

3. Tampering with or destroying College data, records, or other information without authorization; gaining unauthorized access to such information; disclosing confidential information; or otherwise misusing College data or information. Confidential information is defined in State and Federal law and College Policies.

4. Unauthorized use of College vehicles, mail services, identification and credit cards, telephones, computers, or computer equipment, or other College equipment or materials. Computers and computer accounts are provided to employees to assist them in the performance of their jobs. Employees do not have an expectation of privacy in anything they create, send or receive on the computer. The College may review, for business reasons, any and all aspects of any College computer system, including employee email.

5. Use of WC IT Resources is a privilege, not a right. The WC IT Resources may not be used in any manner prohibited by Federal, State or local law or disallowed by licenses, contracts, or College regulations.

Standards of Safety

The College is committed to maintaining the safety and security of all persons on College property and during College activities and to maintain a safe and healthful working environment. Specific prohibited activities include:

1. Possession of firearms, explosives, or other lethal materials on College property or during College activities. Exceptions to this standard must be approved in writing by the President and administered by Public Safety.

2. Possessing, drinking, or being under the influence of intoxicants on the job; unlawful possession, use or distribution of alcohol on College property or during College activities; illegally using, manufacturing, possessing, distributing, dispensing, or being under the influence of controlled substances on College property or during College activities. An exception to this is the consumption of alcohol in moderation at official College events in which alcohol is served. College events where alcohol is served must have servers who have received Training for Intervention Procedures (TIPS).

3. Refusal to obey security officials, Police Officers or Fire Officials, or other proper authorities in emergencies.

4. Failure to comply with safety rules, regulations or common safety practices.

5. Failure to report an accident involving on-the-job injury or damage to College property.

6. Smoking is prohibited in College buildings and outdoors within 25 feet of entrances and exits of campus buildings. Smoking is allowed in designated areas located around campus.

Compliance with Laws and College Policies

College community members are expected to follow normally accepted business and professional standards in matters of business and personal conduct and to exhibit personal and professional integrity and objectivity at all times. Faculty and Staff of the College are expected to take precautions to ensure that outside financial interests do not place them in conflict with carrying out their duties and responsibilities as employees of the College. Community members are expected to behave in a manner consistent with the accepted principles and values of Washington College. Specifically prohibited activities include but are not limited to:

1.  Falsification of College records.

2. Intentional misrepresentation or falsification of academic credentials or work experience, either written or orally.

3. Violation of Federal, State or local laws, regulations, or ordinances in connection with one’s work for the College.

4. Gambling for monetary gain on College property or during College activities. Charity events are specifically excluded from this standard.

5. Failure to observe campus traffic or parking regulations.

6. Soliciting, collecting money, or circulating petitions for personal gain on College property at any time without permission of the chief business officer or designee.

Work Performance

The College expects community members to strive for and meet high quality job performance standards at all times. Issues of poor performance or misconduct compromise both the worker and the organization. Prohibited behaviors include:

1. Refusal to follow reasonable instructions, perform assigned work, or comply with directives of authorized College officials.

2. Failure to wear proper uniform or identification in the prescribed manner as may be required. Departments may develop dress codes appropriate for their operation.

3. Sleeping on the job.

4. Failure or refusal to maintain or obtain required licensure, certification or registration.

5. Instigating or participating in deliberate low productivity and/or interfering with another employee’s work.

Standards of Attendance

The College depends upon community members to carry out the work of the institution; therefore, reliable, consistent attendance is an important requirement of all positions.

1. An absence without proper notification or satisfactory reason is unexcused. An absence for three (3) consecutive days without notification or satisfactory reason is considered a voluntary termination (job abandonment).

2. Tardiness is defined as arriving at work past the appointed starting time without supervisory approval. Repeated unauthorized tardiness will be grounds for disciplinary action.

3. Failure to report to the work place at the beginning of the work period, leaving the workplace prior to the end of the work period, and failure to inform the supervisor when leaving the work area are prohibited.

 

Washington College identification cards may be obtained from the Department of Public Safety during normal business hours 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. The office is located on the lower level of Wicomico Hall.

All employees, along with their spouses and dependent children age 12 -18 who are living at home and claimed on the employee’s tax return, are eligible for a Washington College identification card. In addition to identifying an individual’s association with the College, the ID card is used to gain access to campus facilities and contains a bar code label that is required to check out books at Miller Library. ID cards must be carried on campus at all times and presented to Public Safety officers or officials of the College upon request.  Employees are required to return their ID cards to Public Safety at termination.

 

The following procedures describe official policy for notifying the Washington College Community of closing or changes in our hours of operation due to inclement weather.
  1. The decision for an early release, a delayed opening, or a closed day will be based solely on the conditions on campus. The campus will be open unless the snow, ice or other conditions make it impossible for the campus to operate safely.
  2. Announcements of an early release will be made by the Office of the Sr. Vice President for Finance and Management.
  3. Announcements of a closing or delayed opening will be broadcast as early as possible—we will try to make the decision by 5:00 A.M.—on WBAL-AM radio (1090 on your dial) and WBAL-TV, Baltimore, Channel 11. These are the two stations designated for primary official notification. Notification of closing or delayed opening will also be provided to television stations WMAR 2, WJZ 13, WTTG Fox 5, WJLA 7, WBOC 16, and radio stations WSCL 89.5 FM and WCTR 1530 AM.
  4. Weather related announcements will also be posted on the College’s web site home page at: www.washcoll.edu.
  5. In addition, the switchboard voice mail message will be changed to reflect a closing or delayed opening. You can reach the switchboard by dialing (410) 778-2800.
  6. Should a delayed opening be announced, you should double-check one of these sources before leaving for work in case that announcement has been “upgraded” to a closing.

 

The Department of Public Safety issues keys to authorized personnel as needed to access the necessary offices and buildings for each department. If keys are lost, the employee should notify the employee supervisor immediately. Upon termination of employment, all keys must be returned to Public Safety. Return of College keys to Public Safety is documented on the Exit Clearance Form. 

 

Washington College’s lost and found service is maintained at the Department of Public Safety. All employees are encouraged to take any misplaced personal items found on the campus to Public Safety, and to contact Public Safety should their own property be missing.

 

All employees are permitted to have an automobile or motorbike on campus. All vehicles must be registered with the Department of Public Safety within the first week of employment. Employees can either register online or in person at the Public Safety Office during normal business hours. The registration is free.

Any changes in vehicle type or vehicle license plate number must be reported to the Department of Public Safety.

Faculty/staff parking areas are reserved from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. (Monday-Friday) when classes are in session. Employees may park in any of the spaces designated for faculty/staff, if the vehicle has the proper ID tag issued by the Department of Public Safety. Parking in spaces reserved for other members of the campus community, visitors, or for the handicapped is prohibited. Public Safety officers will issue tickets for parking violations.

On-campus handicapped parking permits, either long or short term, are available through the Department of Public Safety. 

Unpaid parking tickets or frequent violations of parking guidelines may lead to revocation of parking privileges, immobilization of the vehicle, and/or towing of the vehicle.  Employees who are issued parking tickets are expected to follow the direction on the ticket which includes an appeal process.  If the employee takes no action regarding the ticket, Public Safety will forward the bill to the Business Office which will deduct the amount of the ticket from the employees pay.

 

The College makes every attempt to maintain an accurate and up-to-date employee database. Upon hire, new employee information is collected and entered into the Human Resources/Payroll Information Systems. It is the responsibility of the employee to promptly complete the Change of Personal Information form to notify Human Resources of any change in name, address, telephone number, marital status, dependent status or other pertinent information so that the appropriate records can be updated accordingly.

Human Resources maintains the official personnel files in a secure environment. Only authorized individuals or College officials may review a personnel file. An employee may review his/her personal file at the Office of Human Resources but may not remove the file from the premises. Such inspection must take place in the presence of a Human Resources staff member during normal working hours and at an agreed upon time.

 

Employees may bring items of a personal nature to work such as clothing, personal mementos, manuals, books, tools, computer software, stereos, etc. The College is not responsible for the care or custody of personal property left on College property or stored in College facilities. Furthermore, the College is not responsible for damage to an employee’s clothing soiled or damaged on campus during the performance of duties or otherwise.

 

It is the policy of Washington College to provide its employees and students with a safe and healthful work environment and to protect property from controllable hazards. The College’s goal is to minimize all recognizable hazards that may result in personal injury/illness, property damage/loss and business interruptions caused by accidents, fires or other hazards. It is the intent of the College to comply with all federal, state and local health and safety laws/regulations. If an employee identifies a hazardous or potentially hazardous environment or situation, the employee is expected to report such observations to the Department of Public Safety immediately.

1. Work Related Accident or Injury

If an employee experiences an accident or injury while at work, he/she is required to report the incident to his/her supervisor. The supervisor is responsible for documenting a “First Report of Injury” that must be submitted to Human Resources within 72 hours of the accident.

Workers Compensation Policy

Contact for Work Related Accidents and Injuries:
Kate Laking, Benefits Administrator
(410) 778-7799, 

2. Fire Safety

Periodic fire drills will be held to insure the safety of all members of the campus community. Anyone found guilty of intentionally setting off a false fire alarm or tampering with fire equipment (alarm, horn, extinguisher or detection device) will be subject to disciplinary action. Persons failing to evacuate a building during a fire alarm may be subject to disciplinary action. Candles, halogen lamps, and overloaded electrical circuits have been determined to be a fire hazard and may not be used in campus buildings. Periodic inspections will be made by the State Fire Marshall and the Department of Public Safety to promote the safety of all buildings on campus.

3. Policy for Fireworks, Firearms, Ammunition, Explosives, or Other Weapons

The possession, storage, or use of fireworks, firearms, ammunition, explosives, weapon replicas, or other weapons, including any dangerous article or substance with the potential to injure or discomfort a person, including knives with blades of three inches or longer, is prohibited at any time for any purpose at any place on the campus or other property of Washington College. This regulation may be conditionally waived for temporary periods by the President of Washington College for authorized Public Safety Officers or official law enforcement officers in the line of duty, for College-sanctioned public fireworks displays presented and supervised by qualified groups and individuals, and for College-sanctioned athletic events supervised by the Athletic Department.

This regulation may also be conditionally waived for temporary periods by the President of Washington College under such conditions as may be prescribed to permit the exhibition and temporary storage on campus of such articles in connection with activities or events approved and sanctioned by the College.

This regulation does not prohibit an individual otherwise subject to its provisions from carrying or possessing Chemical Mace or similar chemical sprays or propellants on campus property provided that such carrying or possession would not constitute a crime under Maryland criminal law.

Contact for Fire, Weapon and Weather Safety:
Office of Public Safety
Wicomico, Lower Level
(410) 778-7810

4. Right-to-Understand Policy

The “Right-to-Understand” laws establish basic legal rights of employees to know or be informed about any hazardous materials that they may encounter on the job. Washington College employees will be provided information and/or training to become familiar with the campus Right-to-Understand Program, and, where applicable, with the nature of the hazardous chemicals and practices which may exist in their work place.

The Resources Manager of Natural Sciences oversees the implementation of the College’s Right to-Understand Program. Documentation for this program is available on the Washington College website and, upon request, from the department.

Contact for Right-to-Understand:
Kari Travis, Resources Manager
(410) 778-7297, 

5. Safety Equipment

The College provides equipment and protective clothing to ensure that each employee works in a safe environment. Employees who are issued safety equipment and clothing are required to use or wear the equipment when appropriate. Employees who have questions about the use of safety equipment should contact their supervisors immediately.

6. Exposure to Potentially Infectious Material

All personal protective equipment designed to prevent exposure to blood and other potentially infectious material which is used at the College will be provided without cost to the employee. The personal protective equipment will be considered appropriate only if it does not permit blood or other potentially infectious materials to pass through or reach the employee’s clothing, skin, eyes, mouth or other mucous membranes under normal conditions of use for the duration of use.

Contact for Blood Borne Pathogens:
Lisa Marx, Director of Health Services
(410) 778-7261, 

7. College Vehicle Operator Safety Policy

College vehicles may only be used for College business unless the vehicle has been assigned to an employee on a full-time basis. The Washington College Buildings and Grounds Department is responsible for the vehicles, training, and required documentation. If an employee has been assigned a vehicle on a full time basis, personal miles are a taxable benefit.

Any employee whose employment at the College depends on the ability to operate a vehicle should understand that maintaining a safe record is a condition of continued employment. The College reserves the right to terminate an employee whose job requires the operation of a College vehicle should that employee not meet the standards or have his/her license suspended or revoked.

Upon application to drive a College vehicle, each operator will receive a copy of the complete policy stating the requirements, standards, and responsibilities associated with operating a College vehicle. Concerns about the Vehicle Operator Safety Policy should be directed to Public Safety (410) 778-7810.

Contact for Vehicle Operation and Safety:

Office of Public Safety
Wicomico, Lower Level
(410) 778-7810

9. Inclement Weather Policy

The following procedures describe official policy for notifying the Washington College Community of closing or changes in our hours of operation due to inclement weather.

  1. The decision for an early release, a delayed opening, or a closed day will be based solely on the conditions on campus. The campus will be open unless the snow, ice or other conditions make it impossible for the campus to operate safely.
  2. Announcements of an early release will be made by the Office of the Sr. Vice President for Finance and Management.
  3. Announcements of a closing or delayed opening will be broadcast as early as possible—we will try to make the decision by 5:00 A.M.—on WBAL-AM radio (1090 on your dial) and WBAL-TV, Baltimore, Channel 11. These are the two stations designated for primary official notification. Notification of closing or delayed opening will also be provided to television stations WMAR 2, WJZ 13, WTTG Fox 5, WJLA 7, WBOC 16, and radio stations WSCL 89.5 FM and WCTR 1530 AM.
  4. Weather related announcements will also be posted on the College’s web site home page at: www.washcoll.edu.
  5. In addition, the switchboard voice mail message will be changed to reflect a closing or delayed opening. You can reach the switchboard by dialing (410) 778-2800.
  6. Should a delayed opening be announced, you should double-check one of these sources before leaving for work in case that announcement has been “upgraded” to a closing.
10. Vehicle Damage

Washington College is not responsible for damage that may occur to vehicles while parked on campus. This damage includes (but is not limited to) foul ball strikes or objects cast by lawn mowers. Reports of damage can be made with the Public Safety Office, and reports will be given to the vehicle owner upon request.

 

Smoking within the confines of Washington College buildings and vehicles is prohibited. Used smoking materials should be disposed of in an appropriate container and not on the grounds. This policy applies to all employees, students, and visitors.  Please refer to the Code of Conduct for further details.

Whenever an emergency affecting the campus reaches proportions that cannot be handled by routine measures, the Executive Vice President or his designee may declare a State of Emergency. There are two general categories of emergencies that may result in the implementation of this plan:

(1) large-scale disorder and

(2) large-scale natural/man-made disaster.

The following information is a summary of the state of emergency procedures. A complete policy statement and description of all related procedures is available upon request from the Department of Public Safety.

1. Notification

The telephone and electronic mail are both primary means of emergency notification at Washington College. These systems will be used, as needed, for the immediate transmission of specific information regarding an emergency to all affected areas of the campus.

2. Coordination

The Department of Public Safety is the focal point for official emergency telephone communications. Each College administrator, upon receiving notification of a declared or pending State of Emergency, shall pass the information along to those departments/offices under his/her direction.

3.  Emergency Command Post

When a State of Emergency is declared or is imminent, the Department of Public Safety shall set up and staff an appropriate Emergency Command Post. The regular department facilities and communications center located in Wicomico House is also to be kept fully operational at all times. If the emergency involves only one building or a small part of the campus, a Field Emergency Command Post will be established. If the emergency involves a large part of the campus, a General Command Post is to be set up in the Student Affairs Office in the Casey Academic Center. If this site is unavailable, the Emergency Coordinator is to select an alternate location.

4.  Campus Emergency Resource Team

In addition to establishing an Emergency Command Post as necessary, the Department of Public Safety shall immediately begin contacting all members of The Campus Emergency Resource Team not already involved in the emergency response.

The Campus Emergency Resource Team consists of the following personnel:

a.   Emergency Director (Executive Vice President or designee)

b.         Emergency Coordinator (Director of Public Safety)

c.         Director of Physical Plant

d.         Department of Public Safety Patrol Supervisor

e.         Vice President of College Relations

f.          Vice President for Student Affairs

Members of Senior Staff will appoint a specific person as Building/Area Coordinator for every activity under their control. The Building/Area Coordinator has the following general responsibilities during an emergency:

1. Inform all employees under their direction of the emergency condition.

2. Evaluate the impact that the emergency has on their activity and take appropriate action. This may include ceasing operations and initiating building evacuation.

3. Maintain telephone or direct communications with members of their own department during an emergency.

 

Washington College provides its employees with appropriate supplies, facilities and equipment necessary to effectively perform their job duties. Equipment and supplies should not be removed from campus unless it is approved and a work assignment requires use of the College property outside the physical facility of the College.

Employees are encouraged to use College resources prudently and efficiently. Misuse of these resources is regarded as a serious violation of College policy and may lead to disciplinary action. The Code of Conduct policy specifically addresses employees’ responsibility for careful use of College resources. In addition, the College’s Use Policy for Washington College Information Technologies Resources covers the appropriate use of those resources. 

Eligibility

An employee may be eligible for workers’ compensation benefits if the employee is injured on the job or becomes afflicted by an occupational disease associated with job duties while working for the College.

Benefits

Benefits include both paid time-off and payment of related medical expenses. The College will make payments for lost wages for the first 65 days; the College’s workers’ compensation insurance carrier will make subsequent payments for a portion of lost wages. Medical payments for necessary services are the liability of the College’s workers’ compensation insurance carrier.

Compensation Schedule

Day of Injury (day one):   100 percent of pay

Day 2 through Day 65:  100 percent of pay

After Day 65:    66 percent of pay

Continuation of Benefits

For the first 65 days, all of the employee’s benefits will continue. Additionally, leave will continue to accrue according to the usual schedule. After the 65th day, the employee will be considered on leave without pay. Leave without pay is described in Sections 6 & 7 of Chapter 2.

Recovery of Workers’ Compensation Benefits

For the initial 65-day period of benefits, the College will make the lost wages benefit payment. Any other payments received by the employee for lost wages for that period must be immediately signed over to the College and received by Human Resources. Should the College make payments for days that are ultimately not considered eligible under the State program, the employee is responsible for reimbursing the College for the amount of the College’s payments.

Administration

At Time of Injury

On-the-job injuries should be reported immediately to the employee’s supervisor. The supervisor will generally consult with Health Services to determine the referral for appropriate initial treatment. Initial treatment could be on site, at Health Services, at a designated physician’s office, or at a local hospital. The employee’s supervisor is responsible for completing and submitting a “first report” when an injury occurs on the job. The “first report” should be filed with Human Resources within 72 hours of the time that the injury or accident occurs.

After Initial Medical Treatment

The College’s workers’ compensation insurance carrier is responsible for case management after the initial medical treatment. The employee, however, should periodically advise both the employee’s supervisor and Human Resources of his/her status.

Return to Work

Prior to returning to work, the employee must present a physician’s statement authorizing the return to work to the employee’s supervisor and to Human Resources.

 

Hiring and Employment

All applicants are required to complete a job application and submit a resume via Consensus. If, after an initial review of the resume and application, the employee looks to be a fit, an interview will be scheduled. The Office of Human Resources will then perform a background check and the Hiring Official will check references.

The College encourages in-house employees to apply for any position that they may be interested in and qualify for. It is still necessary for in-house applicants to complete the application and formally apply via Consensus.

The College affirmatively opposes discrimination in the workplace, and this includes the hiring process. All qualified applicants are encouraged to apply for available vacancies,. The College does not discriminate on the basis of race, ethnicity, country of origin, disability, gender, marital status, sexual orientation or sexual identity.

If any applicant feels that he or she has been discriminated against during any part of the application process, the applicant is encouraged to direct concerns to the Office of Human Resources at 300 Washington Avenue, Chestertown, MD 21620. All complaints will be treated with sensitivity and the greatest amount of confidentiality permitted by law. 

Upon approval of the recruitment authorization, Human Resources will post all vacant positions on the College website and in cooperation with the Hiring Official, determine advertising venues. Applicants must apply through our online applicant portal in order to be considered as an applicant. Applicants are also required to identify the specific position for which they are applying. Only formally completed applications will be considered. 

 

Leave Plans

At times it may be necessary for the College to declare specific hours as administrative closing as the result of inclement weather or other campus emergency situations.  Up and until that determination is made, the College expects all employees to be on the job when they are scheduled to work.

As the College is a residential community for our students, those departments and operations of the College that support its residential life must remain open for the duration of the inclement weather to ensure the safety and well-being of all people who live here.

Departments that support the College’s residential life, and whose workers are therefore considered “essential personnel,” include Buildings & Grounds (including Grounds, Maintenance and Housekeeping), Dining Services, Public Safety, and Residence Life. 

Others may be classified as “essential personnel” by their department heads, as specific work-related duties or processes may be essential at the time of an unplanned closure. 

Essential personnel will normally be required to report for work at their normally scheduled times, even when classes are canceled and/or administrative offices are closed.

If a closure has not been announced:  Employees who judge that they cannot come to work (typically because of the weather) must use vacation or personal days in order to receive their regular pay.  When there is a business necessity, supervisors may permit employees to make up the time lost provided it can be done within the work week in which the event occurred and the supervisor has approved the request in writing.

Employees may request unplanned vacation or personal leave in anticipation of a weather related emergency.  Approval of such requests will be based on the business requirements of an employee’s services.  If the employee is essential to the continued operation of the department or unit, then the request may be denied.  These same employees will not be allowed to use sick leave for the weather related emergency for which vacation was requested.  If essential employees fail to report to work during a weather related emergency, the missed time will be treated as leave without pay.

If a closure has been announced:  Essential employees who do not report to work will be unpaid.  Essential employees who “call out” for their shift may be disciplined.

Non-exempt (hourly) essential personnel who work will be paid two and one-half times their normal pay rate for any hours worked during the administrative closure.  As this premium pay rate exceeds the requirements for overtime, paid worked administrative closure does not contribute to the hours eligible for overtime.  This two-and-a-half times (2.5x) base pay for time worked during an administrative closure applies to those who work when scheduled and to those called in to provide additional coverage or shifts.

Exempt (salaried) essential personnel who work will receive additional time off for every full day of work required of them during an administrative closure; arrangements should be made with one’s supervisor for taking off additional paid time.

Non-essential personnel (exempt (salaried) and non-exempt (hourly)) who are not required to work will be paid their regular rate for any shift scheduled during an administrative closure.  If the closure occurs when an employee is not scheduled, there is no pay impact (employees who are not scheduled to work during an emergency closing will not be compensated for the emergency closing).

Some examples:

Event:

Essential Hourly Employee Works

Non-Essential Employee Does Not Work

Delay declared at 7am until 10:30am

Employee receives 2.5x their base rate for time worked between 7am and 10:30am

Employee receives regular pay for regularly scheduled hours until 10:30am and is expected to report to work by 10:30am

Delay turns into closure

Employee receives 2.5x their base rate for time worked that day

Employee receives regular pay for regularly scheduled hours that day

Administrative closure announced to begin at 3pm

Employee receives 2.5x their base rate for time worked after 3pm that day

Employee receives regular pay for regularly scheduled hours that day

Administrative closure announced at 7am for the day

Employee receives 2.5x their base rate for time worked that day

Employee receives regular pay for regularly scheduled hours that day

Depending on the nature of the inclement weather or other reason for the administrative closure, essential personnel and those employees who live near campus may be asked to perform emergency functions for which they are qualified but which may be different than the usual functions of their jobs. 

If an employee has scheduled to be off work during an administrative closure (scheduled vacation, personal or sick time), the employee will receive administrative closing pay for the time of the closure instead of being charged for the paid leave.

 

In the event of a death in one’s immediate family (spouse, parent, parent-in-law, child, son- or daughter-in-law, sister, brother, grandparent, grandchild or any other relative living in the employee’s household), a regular full-time employee is entitled to three consecutive days of leave with pay. Bereavement time may be extended with the approval of the supervisor by using vacation leave, personal leave or leave without pay.

 

 

The Family and Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”) provides eligible employees the opportunity to take unpaid, job-protected leave for certain specified reasons. The maximum amount of leave an employee may use is either 12 or 26 weeks within a 12-month period depending on the reasons for the leave. 

Eligibility

To be eligible for FMLA leave, you must:

  1. have worked at least 12 months for the College in the preceding seven years (limited exceptions apply to the seven-year requirement);
  2. have worked at least 1,250 hours for the College over the preceding 12 months; and
  3. currently work at a location where there are at least 50 employees within 75 miles.

Conditions Triggering Leave

FMLA leave may be taken for the following reasons:

  1. Birth of a child, or to care for a newly-born child (up to 12 weeks);
  2. Placement of a child with the employee for adoption or foster care (up to 12 weeks);
  3. To care for an immediate family member (employee’s spouse, child, or parent) with a serious health condition (up to 12 weeks);
  4. Because of the employee’s serious health condition that makes the employee unable to perform the employee’s job (up to 12 weeks)
  5. To care for a Covered Servicemember with a serious injury or illness related to certain types of military service (up to 26 weeks); or,
  6. To handle certain qualifying exigencies arising out of the fact that the employee’s spouse, son, daughter, or parent is on duty under a call or order to active duty in the Armed Forces (e.g., National Guard or Reserves) in support of a contingency operation (up to 12 weeks).

The maximum amount of leave that may be taken in a 12-month period for all reasons combined is 12 weeks, with one exception.  For leave to care for a Covered Servicemember, the maximum combined leave entitlement is 26 weeks, with leaves for all other reasons constituting no more than 12 of those 26 weeks. 

Definitions

A “Serious Health Condition” is an illness, injury, impairment, or physical or mental condition that involves either an overnight stay in a medical care facility, or continuing treatment by a health care provider for a condition that either prevents the employee from performing the functions of the employee’s job, or prevents the qualified family member from participating in College or other daily activities. Subject to certain conditions, the continuing treatment requirement includes an incapacity of more than three full calendar days and two visits to a health care provider or one visit to a health care provider and a continuing regimen of care; an incapacity caused by pregnancy or prenatal visits, a chronic condition, or permanent or long-term conditions; or absences due to multiple treatments.  Other situations may meet the definition of continuing treatment. 

A “Covered Servicemember” is a member of the Armed Forces, including a member of the National Guard or Reserves, who is undergoing medical treatment, recuperation, or therapy, is otherwise in outpatient status, or is otherwise on the temporary disability retired list, for a serious injury or illness.  The term “serious injury or illness” means an injury or illness incurred by the member in the line of duty while on active duty in the Armed Forces that may render the member medically unfit to perform the duties of the member’s office, grade, rank, or rating.

“Qualifying exigencies” include activities such as short-notice deployment, military events, arranging alternative childcare, making financial and legal arrangements related to the deployment, rest and recuperation, counseling, and post-deployment debriefings. 

Identifying the 12-Month Period: The College measures the 12-month period in which leave is taken by the “rolling” 12- month method,  measured backward from the date of any FMLA leave with one exception.  For leave to care for a covered servicemember, the College calculates the 12-month period beginning on the first day the eligible employee takes FMLA leave to care for a covered servicemember and ends 12 months after that date. FMLA leave for the birth or placement of a child for adoption or foster care must be concluded within 12 months of the birth or placement.

Using Leave

Eligible employees may take FMLA leave in a single block of time, intermittently (in separate blocks of time), or by reducing the normal work schedule when medically necessary for the serious health condition of the employee or immediate family member, or in the case of a covered servicemember, his or her injury or illness.  Eligible employees may also take intermittent or reduced-scheduled leave for military qualifying exigencies. Intermittent leave is not permitted for birth of a child, to care for a newly-born child, or for placement of a child for adoption or foster care. Employees who require intermittent or reduced-schedule leave must try to schedule their leave so that it will not unduly disrupt the College’s operations.

Use of Accrued Paid Leave

Depending on the purpose of your leave request, you may choose (or the College may require you) to use accrued paid leave (such as sick leave, vacation, or PTO), concurrently with some or all of your FMLA leave.  In order to substitute paid leave for FMLA leave, an eligible employee must comply with the College’s normal procedures for the applicable paid-leave policy (e.g., call-in procedures, advance notice, etc.). 

Maintenance of Health Benefits

If you and/or your family participate in our group health plan, the College will maintain coverage  during your FMLA leave on the same terms as if you had continued to work.  If applicable, you must make arrangements to pay your share of health plan premiums while on leave. In some instances, the College may recover premiums it paid to maintain health coverage or other benefits for you and your family.  Use of FMLA leave will not result in the loss of any employment benefit that accrued prior to the start of your leave.

Notice and Medical Certification

When seeking FMLA leave, you are required to provide:

  1. Sufficient information for us to determine if the requested leave may qualify for FMLA protection and the anticipated timing and duration of the leave. Sufficient information may include that you are unable to perform job functions, a family member is unable to perform daily activities, the need for hospitalization or continuing treatment by a health care provider, or circumstances supporting the need for military family leave.  You must also inform the College if the requested leave is for a reason for which FMLA leave was previously taken or certified.

If the need for leave is foreseeable, this information must be provided 30 days in advance of the anticipated beginning date of the leave. If the need for leave is not foreseeable, this information must be provided as soon as is practicable and in compliance with the College’s normal call-in procedures, absent unusual circumstances.

  1. Medical certification supporting the need for leave due to a serious health condition affecting you or an immediate family member within 15 calendar days of the College’s request to provide the certification (additional time may be permitted in some circumstances). If you fail to do so, we may delay the commencement of your leave, withdraw any designation of FMLA leave or deny the leave, in which case your leave of absence would be treated in accordance with our standard leave of absence and attendance policies, subjecting you to discipline up to and including termination.  Second or third medical opinions and periodic re-certifications may also be required;
  2. Periodic reports as deemed appropriate during the leave regarding your status and intent to return to work; and
  3. Medical certification of fitness for duty before returning to work, if the leave was due to your serious health condition.  The College will require this certification to address whether you can perform the essential functions of your position. 

Failure to comply with the foregoing requirements may result in delay or denial of leave, or disciplinary action, up to and including termination.

 

Employer Responsibilities

To the extent required by law, the College will inform employees whether they are eligible under the FMLA.  Should an employee be eligible for FMLA leave, the College will provide them with a notice that specifies any additional information required as well as the employee’s rights and responsibilities.  If employees are not eligible, the College will provide a reason for the ineligibility.  The College will also inform employees if leave will be designated as FMLA-protected and, to the extent possible, note the amount of leave counted against the employee’s leave entitlement. If the College determines that the leave is not FMLA-protected, the College will notify the employee.

Job Restoration

Upon returning from FMLA leave, eligible employees will typically be restored to their original job or to an equivalent job with equivalent pay, benefits, and other employment terms and conditions.

Failure to Return After FMLA Leave

Any employee who fails to return to work as scheduled after FMLA leave or exceeds the 12-week FMLA entitlement (or in the case of military caregiver leave, the 26-week FMLA entitlement), will be subject to the College’s standard leave of absence and attendance policies. This may result in termination if you have no other College-provided leave available to you that applies to your continued absence. Likewise, following the conclusion of your FMLA leave, the College’s obligation to maintain your group health plan benefits ends (subject to any applicable COBRA rights). 

Extended Medical Leave

Eligible employees who have exhausted their family and medical leave and all other employees may be allowed to take an extended medical leave of absence, not to exceed twelve (12) months following the last day worked.  Employees who take such extended medical leave are not guaranteed to be returned to work or reinstated to a particular job, rate of pay, or shift at the end of their extended medical leave.  However, the College will attempt to return an employee to his or her regular position if it is available.  If it is not available at the time reinstatement is sought, the College will attempt to place you in a similar job for which you are qualified, if such job is available.  Employees on extended medical leave may maintain their insurance benefits, subject to policy terms and conditions, by paying the applicable COBRA premiums in a timely manner. Employees on extended medical leave do not accrue any additional employee benefits such as paid time off while on extended medical leave.

Other Employment

The College generally prohibits employees from holding other employment. This policy remains in force during all leaves of absence including FMLA leave and may result in disciplinary action, up to and including immediate termination of employment.

Employers’ Compliance with FMLA and Employee’s Enforcement Rights

FMLA makes it unlawful for any employer to interfere with, restrain, or deny the exercise of any right provided under FMLA, or discharge or discriminate against any person for opposing any practice made unlawful by FMLA or for involvement in any proceeding under or relating to FMLA. 

While the College encourages employees to bring any concerns or complaints about compliance with FMLA to the attention of the Human Resources Department, FMLA regulations require employers to advise employees that they may file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Labor or bring a private lawsuit against an employer.

Further, FMLA does not affect any Federal or State law prohibiting discrimination, or supersede any State or local law or collective bargaining agreement which provides greater family or medical leave rights.

Military Caregiver Leave

Unpaid Military Caregiver Leave allows eligible employees to care for certain family members who have sustained serious injuries or illnesses in the line of duty while on active duty. The family member must be a “covered servicemember,” which means: (1) a current member of the Armed Forces, National Guard or Reserves, (2) who is undergoing medical treatment, recuperation, or therapy; is otherwise in outpatient status; or is otherwise on the temporary disability retired list, (3) for a serious injury or illness that may render him or her medically unfit to perform the duties of the member’s office, grade, rank, or rating. Military Caregiver Leave is not available to care for former members of the Armed Forces or the National Guard or Reserves, or for servicemembers on the permanent disability retired list. 

To be “eligible” for Military Caregiver Leave, the employee must be a spouse, son, daughter, parent, or next of kin of the covered servicemember and also meet all other eligibility standards as set forth within the FMLA Leave policy.

An eligible employee may take up to 26 workweeks of Military Caregiver Leave to care for a covered servicemember in a “single 12-month period.”  Within the “single 12-month period”, an eligible employee may take a combined total of 26 weeks of FMLA leave including up to 12 weeks of leave for any other FMLA-qualifying reason (i.e., birth or adoption of a child, serious health condition of the employee or close family member, or a qualifying exigency). 

Qualifying Exigency Leave

Eligible employees may take unpaid “Qualifying Exigency Leave” to tend to certain “exigencies” arising out of the duty under a call or order to active duty of a “covered military member” (i.e. the employee’s spouse, son, daughter, or parent). 

Persons who can be ordered to active duty include retired members of the Regular Armed Forces, certain members of the retired Reserve, and various other Reserve members including the Ready Reserve, the Selected Reserve, the Individual Ready Reserve, the National Guard, state military, Army Reserve, Navy Reserve, Marine Corps Reserve, Air National Guard, Air Force Reserve, and Coast Guard Reserve.

Although Qualifying Exigency Leave is available to an eligible employee whose close family member is called up from status as a retired member of the Regular Armed Forces, it is not available for a close family member on active duty or on call to active duty as a member of the Regular Armed Forces.  Also, a call to active duty refers to a federal call to active duty, and state calls to active duty are not covered unless under order of the President of the United States pursuant to certain laws.

Qualifying Exigency Leave is available under the following circumstances:

  • Short-notice deployment;
  • Military events and related activities;
  • Childcare and College activities;
  • Financial and legal arrangements;
  • Counseling;
  • Temporary rest and recuperation;
  • Post-deployment activities; or
  • Mutually agreed leave. 

Failure to Return from Leave or to Comply with College Policy

Employees may be subject to immediate termination for:

  1. Failure to return to work as scheduled following the end of a leave;
  2. Providing false or misleading information or omitting certain information in connection with a leave;
  3. Violation of any of the College’s rules and regulations relating to leave; or
  4. Violation of any College policy or performance standard.

Effect of Family Leave on Other Benefits

Benefit Accrual Rates

The period of the family and medical leave will not count as service time for the computation of benefits eligibility or earning rates except during the period of paid leave.

Leave Earnings

The employee does not earn vacation leave, personal leave, or sick leave while on family and medical leave except during the period of paid leave.

Retirement Benefit

The employer’s retirement contribution will continue during the period of paid leave. The employee may make arrangements with the College’s Benefits Administrator to make individual contributions (that will not be matched by the College) during the period of unpaid leave.

Health Insurance Benefits

During family and medical leave, an employee’s eligibility to participate in the group health program will be continued. If the leave is unpaid, the employee must make arrangements to pay his/her share of the premium to the Benefits Administrator by the first of the month.

Life and Disability Insurance

Life and disability insurance normally ends at the end of the month, after the unpaid period of the family and medical leave begins, unless an exception has been granted by the insurance carrier and the employee assumes responsibility for the premium payments.

Insurance Premium Payments

Payments for any month of coverage must be made to the College and received by the Benefits Administrator by the first of the month.

Other Benefits

Check with the Director of Human Resources for the applicability of other benefits.

 

Holiday leave is a benefit that provides eligible staff with paid time off to celebrate certain national and other holidays. The amount paid for each day on holiday leave is the amount the employee would earn for a normal workday.

Eligibility

Full-time Employees: Full-time regular employees are eligible for holiday leave (except as provided by the subsections below).

Part-time Employees: Part-time benefit employees with at least half-time appointments are eligible for holiday leave after one year of service. Holiday leave for part-time regular employees is prorated (based upon the percentage of time worked during the previous anniversary year).

Employees With Less Than 12-Month Appointments: Employees with less than 12- month appointments are not paid for holidays that do not fall within their appointment period.

Employees with 12-Month Appointments:  For full-time 12-month staff members whose weekly schedule may not include the holiday as a workday, the College will enable you to take off a different workday as your paid holiday.  Please work with your supervisor to schedule this alternative holiday.

Holiday Leave Days
  • Friday of Spring Break
  • Memorial Day
  • Independence Day
  • The day before Thanksgiving
  • Thanksgiving Day
  • Friday following Thanksgiving
  • Christmas Eve Day through the first work day after New Year’s Day

The College reserves the right to change the holiday schedule to serve the needs of the institution. The holiday schedule is published and distributed by Human Resources in January each year.

Other Holidays

The College recognizes that some employees may wish to celebrate religious and other holidays. Employees may use earned vacation or personal leave to observe these holidays with advanced coordination/approval of their supervisor. 

Payment related to Holidays

Non-Exempt Employees

When possible, hourly staff should be granted another day off in lieu of working on a holiday when it is required that an employee work on the holiday.  For example, if an employee is required to work on July 4th, the employee should work with their supervisor to schedule a different day off as a paid holiday.  If such operational flexibility is not available, regular non-exempt employees required to work on an official College holiday will be paid at one and one-half times their regular hourly rate for actual hours worked on the holiday.

Exempt Employees

Regular exempt employees are not paid extra for working on an official College holiday. An exempt employee may, however, with the approval of the employee’s supervisor, substitute the College holiday for another normal workday

Regular exempt employees are not paid extra for working on an official College holiday. An exempt employee may, however, with the approval of the employee’s supervisor, substitute the College holiday for another normal workday.

Unplanned time Before/After Holidays

Any employee who is absent without the College’s written approval on the scheduled workday before or after the holiday becomes ineligible for holiday pay. If a holiday falls during your vacation, you will record the Holiday as part of your time off.

 A full-time or part-time regular employee selected for jury duty or subpoenaed as a witness in a court action, to which he/she is neither plaintiff nor defendant, will be paid the difference between the employee’s regular pay for the scheduled hours and the amount paid by the Court. An employee may elect to keep the court compensation and claim the time off as vacation leave. An employee is expected to return to work if excused by the court before the end of the regular workday. The employee may be requested to furnish evidence from the Clerk of the Court of such duty.
 
Eligibility

Regular full-time employees, with at least one year of service, are eligible to request a leave of absence without pay.

Request

An employee seeking a leave of absence without pay must submit a request in writing to the employee’s supervisor with a copy to the Director of Human Resources. The request must specify the reason for the leave and the duration of the leave.

Approval Process

A request for a leave of absence of five or fewer days may be approved or denied by the employee’s supervisor after consultation with the Director of Human Resources.

A request for a leave of absence of more than five days may be approved or denied by the Director of Human Resources after consultation with the employee’s supervisor and the Vice President for Finance and Management. The determination will be in writing and an approval letter will set forth the conditions associated with the leave of absence.

Terms of a Leave of Absence

Length

A leave of absence may not exceed one year.

Exhaustion of Leave Benefits

Prior to the beginning of any leave of absence without pay, the employee must use all available vacation and personal leave.

Employment Relationship

The employment relationship is continued during the leave of absence without pay. An approved leave will not be counted as a break in service.

Pay

Eligibility for a pay adjustment upon return to service will depend upon the duration of the leave and will be specified in the letter granting the leave of absence without pay.

Benefits

Benefit Accrual Rates

The period of the leave of absence without pay will not count as service time for the computation of benefits eligibility or benefit accrual rates.

Leave Earnings

An employee does not earn vacation leave, personal leave, or sick leave while on leave of absence without pay.

Retirement Contributions

Retirement contributions by the College will cease during the leave of absence without pay. The employee should contact the College’s Benefits Administrator if the employee is interested in continuing an individual contribution on an after-tax basis to his/her retirement account. In this case, the College will not match the employee’s contribution.

Health Insurance Benefits

During a leave of absence without pay, an employee is eligible to participate in the College’s group health plan. The employee is responsible for the full payment of the premium under COBRA. Employees with 10 years of continuous service are entitled to a temporary continuation of the health insurance benefit (the College will continue to pay the employer’s portion for 3 months). After the 3-month period, an employee may continue to participate in the plan, but he/she will then be responsible for the full payment of the premium under COBRA.

Life and Disability Insurance

Life and disability insurance coverage normally ends at the end of the month after the leave of absence begins unless an exception has been granted by the insurance carrier and the employee assumes responsibility for the premium payments.

Insurance Premium Payments

Payments for any month of coverage must be made to the College and received by the Benefits Administrator by the first of the month.

Other Benefits

All other benefits will cease during the leave of absence without pay.

Employment at the End of the Leave

Return to Work

At the end of the approved leave of absence without pay the employee is expected to return to work. Unless otherwise specified in the letter granting the leave of absence, the College will make every possible attempt to provide the employee a position with duties similar to, but not necessarily the same as, the position from which leave was taken. Return to a position is not guaranteed.

The employee’s pay will be determined based upon the standard salary range for the new position. The employee’s eligibility for benefits will be the same as was in effect at the beginning of the leave of absence, unless the College has changed materially one or more of the benefit programs for staff employees with similar status and length of service.

At least two weeks prior to the end of the approved leave of absence without pay, the employee must notify the employee’s supervisor that the employee expects to return to work on the approved date. The employee should also arrange with the Benefits Administrator to reinstate the desired benefits and be briefed on any changes in the benefit program.

Failure to Return to Work

If an employee does not return to work at the end of the approved leave of absence, the employment relationship is terminated and any outstanding payments must be reimbursed to the College.

 

Washington College will grant military leave of absence without pay to all regular full-time or regular part-time employees who enlist in the regular U.S. Armed Forces as well as the Reserves or National Guard. In the case of the Reserves or National Guard, leave will be permitted for initial training, periodic training (weekend duty or summer camp) and when the employee is called to active duty. The employee should notify his/her supervisor in advance of reporting to active duty. A Reservist or National Guardsman should provide the supervisor with a schedule of planned training periods. An employee who must serve in the Reserves or National Guard planned training may count this time as paid vacation leave or a leave of absence without pay.

In accordance with applicable federal and state laws, upon completion of military service, the College will restore the employee to his/her former position or to a position of like seniority, status and pay, provided they apply for reappointment within the designated legal time limits established by federal law and are qualified to resume employment. Any seniority established by an employee entering military service will be protected.

An employee on military leave will be eligible for benefits continuation as outlined in the leave of absence without pay policy. Employees on military leave will continue to accrue vacation and sick leave. An employee who plans to take military leave should inform Human Resources as early as possible to insure the continuity of applicable benefits.

 

An employee who a) is eligible for family and medical leave under the College’s policy; and b) gives birth to a child, or is the parent of a newborn (co-resident) child, or adopts a child, is eligible for parental leave.

Leave Period

Parental leave provides up to 15 weeks of paid leave at the same rate of pay that would have normally been received during that period. The 15 weeks of paid leave runs concurrently with any leave available to the employee under the Family and Medical Leave Act. If both parents of the child are employees of the College who qualify for this benefit, only one leave will be granted, but the 15 weeks of the parental leave may be divided between two consecutive time periods selected by the parents.

For Staff employees, the 15-week period commences on the earlier of the first day of disability or the day of childbirth or adoption. Staff employees are not required to use accrued leave, but do not accrue additional leave during the 15-week period.

Faculty employees may elect one of three options for the leave:

  1. Beginning at the time of disability, birth or adoption. The total of 15 weeks may be divided between the fall and spring semesters.
  2. During the semester in which the birth or adoption is expected. Or;
  3. During the fall semester, if the birth occurs in late spring or during the summer and leave was not taken in the spring semester.

For faculty, the summer weeks are not counted as part of the 15 weeks of leave.

Faculty and Staff expecting to use parental leave must arrange with the Provost and Dean and/or supervisor for duties or assignments during the portions of semesters not covered by their leave, if any.

Parental Leave must be approved in advance by the Office of Human Resources. Failure to complete the necessary FMLA application prior to the start of Parental Leave will result in denial of the paid leave.

Benefit eligible full-time non-exempt employees are the only employees eligible for Personal Leave. Personal Leave is allocated on July 1 of each year and is available for immediate use. 

EMPLOYEE STATUS

TOTAL ALLOWANCE

Full-time Employees (40 hours)

24 hours per year

Full-time Employees (35 hours)

21 hours per year

 

Eligibility

Regular full-time employees who have completed one year of continuous full-time employment are eligible for short-term disability leave.

Purpose

Short-term disability leave may be used when the employee is unable to perform the material duties of the employee’s regular job because of a non-work related illness, injury, or medical condition.

Exclusion Period

Short-term disability leave will not commence until after 30 continuous workdays of a certified medical disability. Workday is based on the employee’s work schedule and excludes administrative closings and paid Holidays.

Benefits

For the 31st to the 65th workday, the employee receives 100 percent of pay.  For the 66th through the earlier of the 130th workday or the date for which the employee begins eligibility for long-term disability, the employee receives 60 percent basic monthly earnings as defined in the long-term disability insurance policy in effect at the beginning of the leave.

For any period for which the employee receives Short Term Disability benefits under this policy, vacation, sick, and personal leave will continue to accrue and the College will continue to pay the employer’s portion of premiums for group life insurance, disability insurance, health insurance and retirement contribution.

Coordination of Benefits

An employee may elect to use any available sick or vacation leave to receive up to 100 percent of the employee’s pre-disability pay after the 66th day and before long-term disability takes effect. Available sick leave may include sick leave pool withdrawals fro sick leave pool members.

Documentation

The employee must present a written physician’s certification to Human Resources before benefits will be paid under this policy. During the leave period, the College reserves the right to require a medical examination by a physician selected by the College. The College will pay for a required medical examination. The College also requires a periodic update from a physician regarding the employee’s ability to return to work. Furthermore, an employee must present a physician’s certification documenting his/her ability to return to work.

 

 Sick leave provides eligible employees with paid time off to obtain routine medical services and/or medical treatment and to recuperate from illness or injury. All benefit eligible full time employees and part-time benefit eligible employees are eligible for sick leave. An employee should request sick leave as early as possible prior to the employee’s scheduled starting time.

Sick leave may be used in the case of an illness, disability or injury of the employee. Sick leave may also be used for an illness or disability of an employee’s children, spouse or parents if the employee’s attendance is required.

EMPLOYEE STATUS

TOTAL ALLOWANCE

ACCRUAL RATE (PER PAY PERIOD)

Full-time Employees (40 hours)

80 hours per year

3.08 hours

Full-time Employees (35 hours)

70 hours per year

2.70 hours

Full-time Employees (10 month, 35 hours)

56 hours per year

2.55 hours

The purpose of the Sick Leave Pool is to establish an equitable way of allowing employees to share their accumulated sick leave with others in need of additional sick leave until the employee is eligible for the College’s short-term disability programs.

The intent of this program is to protect benefit eligible employees who may face financial hardship because they have exhausted all of their own vacation, sick, or personal leave due to an extended serious, catastrophic, or unforeseen illness, injury or impairment.

All benefit eligible employees who accrue and use sick leave, are eligible to become a member and donate to and withdraw from the Sick Leave Pool. This program is not available to temporary employees who do not earn leave.

Donation and Membership

Membership is established when a benefit eligible employee donates at least one sick day to the sick leave pool July 1st of each fiscal year. Contributions will be accepted by completing a Sick Leave Pool Donation Form available on the Human Resources webpage. A benefit eligible employee may contribute a minimum of one day up to a maximum of ten sick days per fiscal year.

At termination of employment, sick leave is forfeited; therefore all employees are eligible to donate their unused sick hours to the sick leave pool. During the Exit Interview an employee may complete a Sick Leave Pool Donation form. Employees are eligible to donate up to 80 hours to the Sick Leave Pool at termination of employment.

Withdrawal

Withdrawals from the Sick Leave Pool are permitted only for serious, catastrophic, or unforeseen illness, injury or impairment of the employee that meets the following criteria. The employee must have exhausted all vacation, sick, personal leave and the employee will have to take leave without pay and (b) requires continuing treatment or supervision by a licensed health care provider, and also (c) requires absence from work of at least five days per illness or episode. Withdrawals from the Sick Leave Pool may only be taken in increments of full days. Withdrawals may only occur to the extent of the Sick Leave Pool contributions available for withdrawal and the beneficiary has no leave time available.

Vacation leave is a benefit that provides eligible employees with paid time off to take vacations and pursue other personal endeavors. It is expected that vacation leave will normally be scheduled 48 hours in advance of the leave requested. 

*Please note: Exempt Leave Requests must be submitted to the Business Office*

 

Part-time Employees

Benefit eligible part-time employees earn leave on a prorated basis in proportion to the hours worked.

 

Employee

Status

Hours per

week

Annual

Accrual

Rate

Per Pay

Accrual

Rate (hours)

Annual

Allowance

(hours)

Maximum

Accrual 

Balance

(hours)

Exempt (salary) 40

4 weeks

(160 hours)

6.16 160 160
Exempt (salary)

35

4 weeks

(140 hours)

5.39 140 140

Non-exempt (hourly)

 

 

     
Less than 3 years 40

2 weeks

(80 hours)

3.08 80 160
3-6 years 40

3 weeks

(120 hours)

4.62 120 160
Over 6 years 40

4 weeks

(160 hours)

6.16 160 160
Non-exempt (hourly)          
Less than 3 years 35

2 weeks

(70 hours)

2.7 70 140
3-6 years 35

3 weeks

(105 hours)

4.04 105 140
Over 6 years 35

4 weeks

(140 hours)

5.39 140 140

11 month Full-Time Staff

(salaried & hourly)

35

 

3 weeks

(105 hours)

4.04 105 120

10 month Full-Time Staff

(salaried & hourly)

35

2 weeks

(70 hours)

2.7 70 120
Librarians 35 6 weeks 8.08 210 160

Part-time (reduced work-week

staff, etc.)

vary

Pro-rated per

work schedule

Varies based

on work

schedule

varies 120

Payroll and Work Schedules

At times it may be necessary for the College to declare specific hours as administrative closing as the result of inclement weather or other campus emergency situations.  Up and until that determination is made, the College expects all employees to be on the job when they are scheduled to work.

As the College is a residential community for our students, those departments and operations of the College that support its residential life must remain open for the duration of the inclement weather to ensure the safety and well-being of all people who live here.

Departments that support the College’s residential life, and whose workers are therefore considered “essential personnel,” include Buildings & Grounds (including Grounds, Maintenance and Housekeeping), Dining Services, Public Safety, and Residence Life. 

Others may be classified as “essential personnel” by their department heads, as specific work-related duties or processes may be essential at the time of an unplanned closure. 

Essential personnel will normally be required to report for work at their normally scheduled times, even when classes are canceled and/or administrative offices are closed.

If a closure has not been announced:  Employees who judge that they cannot come to work (typically because of the weather) must use vacation or personal days in order to receive their regular pay.  When there is a business necessity, supervisors may permit employees to make up the time lost provided it can be done within the work week in which the event occurred and the supervisor has approved the request in writing.

Employees may request unplanned vacation or personal leave in anticipation of a weather related emergency.  Approval of such requests will be based on the business requirements of an employee’s services.  If the employee is essential to the continued operation of the department or unit, then the request may be denied.  These same employees will not be allowed to use sick leave for the weather related emergency for which vacation was requested.  If essential employees fail to report to work during a weather related emergency, the missed time will be treated as leave without pay.

If a closure has been announced:  Essential employees who do not report to work will be unpaid.  Essential employees who “call out” for their shift may be disciplined.

Non-exempt (hourly) essential personnel who work will be paid two and one-half times their normal pay rate for any hours worked during the administrative closure.  As this premium pay rate exceeds the requirements for overtime, paid worked administrative closure does not contribute to the hours eligible for overtime.  This two-and-a-half times (2.5x) base pay for time worked during an administrative closure applies to those who work when scheduled and to those called in to provide additional coverage or shifts.

Exempt (salaried) essential personnel who work will receive additional time off for every full day of work required of them during an administrative closure; arrangements should be made with one’s supervisor for taking off additional paid time.

Non-essential personnel (exempt (salaried) and non-exempt (hourly)) who are not required to work will be paid their regular rate for any shift scheduled during an administrative closure.  If the closure occurs when an employee is not scheduled, there is no pay impact (employees who are not scheduled to work during an emergency closing will not be compensated for the emergency closing).

Some examples:

Event:

Essential Hourly Employee Works

Non-Essential Employee Does Not Work

Delay declared at 7am until 10:30am

Employee receives 2.5x their base rate for time worked between 7am and 10:30am

Employee receives regular pay for regularly scheduled hours until 10:30am and is expected to report to work by 10:30am

Delay turns into closure

Employee receives 2.5x their base rate for time worked that day

Employee receives regular pay for regularly scheduled hours that day

Administrative closure announced to begin at 3pm

Employee receives 2.5x their base rate for time worked after 3pm that day

Employee receives regular pay for regularly scheduled hours that day

Administrative closure announced at 7am for the day

Employee receives 2.5x their base rate for time worked that day

Employee receives regular pay for regularly scheduled hours that day

 

Depending on the nature of the inclement weather or other reason for the administrative closure, essential personnel and those employees who live near campus may be asked to perform emergency functions for which they are qualified but which may be different than the usual functions of their jobs. 

If an employee has scheduled to be off work during an administrative closure (scheduled vacation, personal or sick time), the employee will receive administrative closing pay for the time of the closure instead of being charged for the paid leave.

 

Employees and their families may join the Johns Hopkins Federal Credit Union. There is a membership fee required to open an account with the credit union. A minimum account balance is required to maintain the membership in the credit union. The credit union offers savings and checking accounts, loans, certificates of deposit, and IRAs. Deposits and loan payments may be conveniently made through payroll deduction.

For more information about fees and membership please visit the JHFCU website

 

The College offers Direct Deposit of paychecks. With Direct Deposit, the employee’s pay is available at the opening of business as “available funds” in the employee’s bank account (or accounts) in virtually any financial institution in the United States. With Direct Deposit, there is neither the need to take the time to deposit the paycheck in-person nor to wait until the paycheck clears to use the funds. With Direct Deposit, the paycheck cannot be lost or stolen. Direct Deposit also is convenient when payday occurs while the employee is on vacation or away from campus or when payday occurs while the campus is closed for winter break.

Employees that wish to enroll in or change their Direct Deposit must complete the Direct Deposit Authorization form and submit verification of their account(s). 

 

According to state law, all staff employees are employed “at-will” which means that they can be terminated at any time with or without cause and with or without advance notice.  This “at-will” relationship can be changed only in a written document signed by the President of the College.      

Exempt Employee

An exempt employee  is an employee  who is not covered  by the Fair Labor Standards  Act’s recordkeeping minimum wage and overtime provisions. Whether an employee is exempt depends on the duties, responsibilities, and salary of the position. In general, executive, administrative and professional personnel are considered exempt employees. The position description specifies whether or not a position is exempt. Exempt employees are always paid on a salary basis.

Non-Exempt Employee

A non-exempt employee is an employee who is covered under the Fair Labor Standards Act’s record keeping minimum wage and overtime provisions. A non-exempt employee will be paid at least the minimum wage for all hours worked, is eligible for overtime pay after a non-exempt employee works more than 40 hours in a week (defined as Saturday through  Friday),  and must keep an accurate record of all hours worked.   Non-exempt employees must be paid on a salary or hourly basis.

Regular Employee

A regular employee is an employee who is hired for an unspecified period of time in a position that may be continued from year-to-year on a 9, 10 or 12-month basis. Regular employees are eligible for College sponsored benefits in addition to benefits required by federal or state law.

Temporary Employee

A temporary employee is an employee who is hired for an unspecified period of time based upon the needs of the College without expectation of continued employment. A temporary employee is not eligible for College sponsored benefits (except for the benefits required by law).

Full-Time Employee

A full-time employee is an employee whose normal work schedule is at least 35 hours per week.

Part-Time Employee

A part-time employee is an employee who is normally scheduled to work less than 35 hours per week.

 

The Office of Human Resources will determine salary and notify the hiring official and they should proceed with the completion of the Employment Authorization Form in its entirety and forward to The Office of Human Resources. As soon as the Employment Authorization form is received, an offer of employment will be extended to the candidate.

Only the Provost or Director or Human Resources may extend a written employment offer.

All employment offers are contingent upon successful completion of a pre-employment background check and other applicable hiring procedures. If the pre- employment background check results are unsatisfactory, the offer will be revoked. If the pre- employment background check results are satisfactory, the Director of Human Resources will send an employment offer letter and the employee will be scheduled for orientation.

The employee must visit the Office of Human Resources to complete the pay pack before their first day of work.

 

Normal Work Hours

Normal work hours for full-time staff are 35 or 40 hours per week.

  • Full-time office and clerical personnel are generally scheduled to work 35 hours per week from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, with one unpaid hour for lunch.
  • Most Buildings and Grounds, Public Safety and Dining Services employees and some other employees throughout campus are regularly scheduled to work a 40-hour week, the schedule of which is determined by the department. A 30-minute unpaid meal period is included in the daily schedule.

The supervisor, department lead, director or VP will inform staff members, upon hiring, of the expected work schedule for the position.

Breaks

Employees are permitted to take appropriate breaks throughout the day.  For most 40-hour-per-week positions, employees are allowed up to two fifteen-minute paid breaks per full day, normally one in the first-half of one’s shift and one in the second-half of one’s shift.  Employees who are nursing mothers may take breaks to facilitate breastfeeding or milk expression, as provided by the College’s policy for Break Time for Breastfeeding Mothers.

Exempt Employees

Work schedules for exempt employees may vary because of coordination with academic needs, special events, or the needs of individual departments. Exempt employees are expected to meet the responsibilities of their work assignments within the framework of the College’s normal work schedule, with reasonable latitude for irregular workloads or special demands. Exempt employees leave request forms are due to the Payroll Office the Monday immediately after pay day for any leave taken in that pay period.

Non-Exempt Employees

Non-exempt employees are required to accurately document their time worked and their time off, using the designated time-keeping system for their department, which may be Web Time Entry or a timeclock in the work area.

  • The College rounds partial hours to the nearest quarter hour (e.g. 1:05pm rounds to 1pm; 1:12pm rounds to 1:15pm).
  • Without prior approval, employees should not:
    • begin their workday (“clock-in”) before the rounding period at the start of their shift, and/or
    • end their workday (“clock-out”) after the rounding period at the end of their workday
  • Time records must, at a minimum, include the number of hours worked each day and any paid time-off (e.g. vacation, sick, personal leave).
  • Time records should be completed by staff employees by noon on the Monday prior to payday; supervisors should approve time records by 2pm on the Monday prior to payday.

Time records for student workers should include actual start and end times (clock-in and clock-out times) and should be submitted and approved per the student payroll schedule.

  • A time record must be signed (electronically) by both the employee and the employee’s supervisor or designee.

Supervisors should clearly communicate and enforce the beginning and ending time of the workday (schedule) and should provide prior approval (verbal) for overtime, with the electronic timecard approval as a follow-up action.  Non-exempt employees will be paid for all time worked, however working unapproved overtime can result in disciplinary action.

Travel and Teleworking:   When to include in “hours worked”

Teleworking (Smartphone/Web Use and/or Working At Home)

If a non-exempt employee uses his/her smartphone to text, call or check email outside of her normal working hours, the time spent doing so would need to be added to his/her time for the day.

Travel Time

  • Single-day trip and all travel is during normal working hours, include the travel time in your hours worked for that day.

Example:  Travel to a meeting in Annapolis, leaving at 8:30am and arriving back at campus at 3pm.

  • Single-day trip and some travel is outside normal working hours, include all of the time spent traveling in the hours worked for that day.

Example: A non-exempt admissions counselor drives to a mid-week recruitment event in Pennsylvania:

Starting travel at 7 am for 3 hours 3 hrs
Sets-up materials from 10 am to 11am 1 hr
Has lunch at the event provided by the host,
ensuring materials are attended
1 hr
Work the event from 12 noon until 4 pm 4 hrs
Packs up and starts traveling at 4:30 pm 0.5 hr
Stops for dinner for 45 minutes* 0 hr
Arrives home at 8:15 pm 3 hrs
Total Work Hours 12.5 hrs

*Meal expenses paid by the College per the Travel & Expense Policy.  The day’s mileage or car rental also covered under the College’s Travel & Expense Policy.

  • If the employee is performing work during the travel time (e.g. reading prospective student files or donor profiles, or checking email while traveling), then the time spent doing work is included in the hours worked, as any work done during “passive” travel time (train, plane, ferry, etc.) is still work.
  • Travel time is work time if it occurs during the employee’s normal working hours, even if the travel is on nonworking days. For an overnight trip, hours spent traveling during the employee’s normal working hours are included in the hours worked, as are is “active” travel time.

Example:  A non-exempt employee attends a work-related conference in Chicago:

Worked in the office from 8:30 am until 12 noon 3.5 hrs

Start travel at 12 noon for an 3:15 pm flight out of

Philadelphia

3.25 hrs
Flew from PHL to ORD, flight arriving at 6 pm CST (work day ends 4:30 pm EST) 1.25 hrs
Took shuttle to hotel & ate dinner near the hotel* 0 hr
Kept up with work email before bed 0.25 hrs
Total Hours Worked 9 hours
Conference starts at 8:30 am, includes continental breakfast



7 hrs

1-hour Break for lunch off-site at establishment of employee’s choice
Conference wraps up at 4:30 pm
Check email until 5:30 pm  1 hr
Met up with some conference attendees for dinner* 0 hr
Checked email before bed 0.25 hrs
Total Hours Worked 8.25 hrs
Conference starts at 8:30 am

 

5.5 hrs

Conference wraps up at 2pm and includes a boxed lunch during a workshop.
Checked email until 3pm 1 hr
Took shuttle to airport for 5 pm flight (work day ends at 4:30 pm) 1.5 hrs
Arrives in Philadelphia at 7pm EST typing notes for 45 min. during flight 0.75 hrs
Drove home from airport 3.25 hrs
Total Work Hours 12 hrs

*Meal expenses paid by the College per the Travel & Expense Policy.  The travel and hotel also covered under the College’s Travel & Expense Policy.

Overtime

During certain peak periods, additional work may be required during a normal workweek. Only non-exempt employees are eligible for overtime compensation; exempt employees are not eligible for overtime compensation.  All overtime must be directed and approved by the employee’s supervisor in advance.  Supervisors must seek approval of substantial overtime commitments from the appropriate management prior to assigning overtime work. Working unapproved overtime can result in disciplinary action.

For the purpose  of  computing  overtime,  the College’s workweek  is  defined  as  Saturday  through  Friday. 

  • Hours worked up to 40 hours per week are paid at the employee’s regular hourly rate of pay.
  • For hours work in excess of 40 hours per week, overtime wages will be paid at one and a half times the employee’s hourly rate, except for those hours worked and paid under the College’s Administrative Closing Pay Policy as such hours are already paid at more than 1.5 times the employee’s normal hourly rate.

 

Eligibility

Regular full-time employees, with at least one year of service, are eligible to request a leave of absence without pay.

Request

An employee seeking a leave of absence without pay must submit a request in writing to the employee’s supervisor with a copy to the Director of Human Resources. The request must specify the reason for the leave and the duration of the leave.

Approval Process

A request for a leave of absence of five or fewer days may be approved or denied by the employee’s supervisor after consultation with the Director of Human Resources.

A request for a leave of absence of more than five days may be approved or denied by the Director of Human Resources after consultation with the employee’s supervisor and the Vice President for Finance and Management. The determination will be in writing and an approval letter will set forth the conditions associated with the leave of absence.

Terms of a Leave of Absence

Length

A leave of absence may not exceed one year.

Exhaustion of Leave Benefits

Prior to the beginning of any leave of absence without pay, the employee must use all available vacation and personal leave.

Employment Relationship

The employment relationship is continued during the leave of absence without pay. An approved leave will not be counted as a break in service.

Pay

Eligibility for a pay adjustment upon return to service will depend upon the duration of the leave and will be specified in the letter granting the leave of absence without pay.

Benefits

Benefit Accrual Rates

The period of the leave of absence without pay will not count as service time for the computation of benefits eligibility or benefit accrual rates.

Leave Earnings

An employee does not earn vacation leave, personal leave, or sick leave while on leave of absence without pay.

Retirement Contributions

Retirement contributions by the College will cease during the leave of absence without pay. The employee should contact the College’s Benefits Administrator if the employee is interested in continuing an individual contribution on an after-tax basis to his/her retirement account. In this case, the College will not match the employee’s contribution.

Health Insurance Benefits

During a leave of absence without pay, an employee is eligible to participate in the College’s group health plan. The employee is responsible for the full payment of the premium under COBRA. Employees with 10 years of continuous service are entitled to a temporary continuation of the health insurance benefit (the College will continue to pay the employer’s portion for 3 months). After the 3-month period, an employee may continue to participate in the plan, but he/she will then be responsible for the full payment of the premium under COBRA.

Life and Disability Insurance

Life and disability insurance coverage normally ends at the end of the month after the leave of absence begins unless an exception has been granted by the insurance carrier and the employee assumes responsibility for the premium payments.

Insurance Premium Payments

Payments for any month of coverage must be made to the College and received by the Benefits Administrator by the first of the month.

Other Benefits

All other benefits will cease during the leave of absence without pay.

Employment at the End of the Leave

Return to Work

At the end of the approved leave of absence without pay the employee is expected to return to work. Unless otherwise specified in the letter granting the leave of absence, the College will make every possible attempt to provide the employee a position with duties similar to, but not necessarily the same as, the position from which leave was taken. Return to a position is not guaranteed.

The employee’s pay will be determined based upon the standard salary range for the new position. The employee’s eligibility for benefits will be the same as was in effect at the beginning of the leave of absence, unless the College has changed materially one or more of the benefit programs for staff employees with similar status and length of service.

At least two weeks prior to the end of the approved leave of absence without pay, the employee must notify the employee’s supervisor that the employee expects to return to work on the approved date. The employee should also arrange with the Benefits Administrator to reinstate the desired benefits and be briefed on any changes in the benefit program.

Failure to Return to Work

If an employee does not return to work at the end of the approved leave of absence, the employment relationship is terminated and any outstanding payments must be reimbursed to the College. 

On call policy is supplemental pay provided to non-exempt staff who, during off duty hours, must remain available for duty on short notice. This policy applies to maintenance mechanic group and the rotating on-call responsibly in Buildings and Grounds.

  1. During the on call week there will be a premium of $2.00 per hour for the base 40 hour week.
  2. The schedule two-hour boiler room and operating check on Saturday and Sunday will be at the regular overtime rate, no mileage reimbursement. A. A minimum of two hours, paid at the regular overtime rate.
  3. Emergency call backs from Public Safety will be: 
  1. A minimum of two hours, paid at the regular overtime rate
  2. Actual mileage to and from the College will be reimbursed at the current rate per mile as established by college policy. 

4. A call back received while on campus does not restart the two hour minimum, only accrual time on campus is paid, and there is not a double mileage reimbursement, only actual miles driven. 

 

 

During certain peak periods, additional work may be required during a normal workweek. Only non-exempt employees are eligible for overtime compensation; exempt employees are not eligible for overtime compensation.  All overtime must  be directed  and  approved  by the  employee’s supervisor in advance. Supervisors should seek approval of substantial overtime commitments from the appropriate management prior to assigning overtime work.

For the purpose  of  computing  overtime,  a workweek  is  defined  as  Saturday  through  Friday.  Hours worked up to 40 hours are paid at the employee’s regular hourly rate of pay. Overtime wages at one and a half times the employee’s normal hourly rate will be paid for work in excess of 40 hours per week.  Approved leave time will count as hours worked.

 

Washington College provides employees with a total compensation package, comprised of both salary and benefits, that recognize and reward performance and productivity while maintaining a competitive market position and internal equity.  In support of the College’s mission we endeavor to provide a level of compensation, both cash and benefits, to attract, motivate and retain the quality of workforce necessary for the achievement of the College’s goals.  The compensation program shall be consistent, responsive, transparent, and equitable.

The College is committed to a meritocracy.  Our performance management program is designed to increase the personal and professional effectiveness of our staff including providing staff with clear performance expectations and developmental opportunities.  We provide leaders with the tools and training to enable them to build effective teams and lead successfully including coaching performance and making sound compensation decisions.

The philosophy is accomplished by maintaining accurate job descriptions on all positions and  benchmarking jobs against comparable positions in the market.  Market data is defined as either CUPA HR data on comparable institutions or the local labor market depending on the position.  Comparator College is defined as by Human Resources in coordination with Senior Staff.

Decisions regarding compensation programs and individual pay decisions will be made based on the above objectives as well as the College’s financial situation.

Pay for individual positions is reviewed at least annually, following the completion of annual performance  reviews.  The  adjustments  reflect  a  number  of  factors  including  the  employee performance  as reflected in the annual performance  review, changes in the cost of living, and efforts to compensate employees in a more competitive manner based on comparable positions in the job market. Employees who commence employment in a new position after March 31 will only  be  eligible  for  comparability  adjustments. 

The College has a relatively small staff, and employees may need to fill-in for other employees who have left or are on leave. Normally, an employee working temporarily in a position with a higher pay is not provided  a salary adjustment  nor entitled  to acting pay. If the out-of-pay grade assignment continues for a significant duration and the duties are substantially greater, the Director of Human Resources may authorize acting pay which may take the form of an increase in the authorized pay rate or one or more “bonus” type payments.

Pay adjustments  outside the normal annual review process are authorized  only in exceptional circumstances and must be reviewed and approved in advance by the Director of Human Resources.

In general, all full-time (12 month) College employees are paid bi-weekly (26 or 27 pay periods per year). Payday is every other Friday. For an hourly employee, the gross amount of the check should normally be equal to the hours worked during the pay period multiplied by the employee’s hourly rate. Any premium time adjustments are added to the normal gross amount. For an exempt salaried employee, the gross amount of the check will be 1/26th or 1/27th of the employee’s annual salary.

The College is required by law to make payroll deductions  for social security, Medicare, and federal  and  state  income  taxes.  The  College  is  also  required  to  deduct  any  court-ordered garnishments. In addition, the College deducts the employee’s portion of any elected benefits with the written authorization of the employee.

Payroll and Work Schedules

The Washington College Payroll division serves Washington College’s diverse employee base by providing accurate and timely compensation to all staff, faculty and student employees in an efficient manner. Leave and hours worked are reported as follows:

Please note: Timesheets and Leave Requests must be submitted to the Business Office

For further information regarding time and leave reporting please contact the Business Office.

For further information regarding employment offers, work schedule policies, scheduling leave and Direct Deposit please contact the Office of Human Resources.

 

Performance Review and Promotion

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Purchasing Policies

 
 
 
 
For more procedures and forms for purchasing, corporate credit cards and reimbursements, please visit the Business Office Employee Services page.