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WC in the News

The media turns to our faculty experts to enhance coverage of a wide range of topics, from international security and economic policy to American history and politics. 

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  • 02/09/11 National Public Radio WAMU
    Melissa Deckman, Professor and Chair of Political Science, is interviewed on National Public Radio about speculation that Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan may challenge President Donald Trump in the 2020 Republican primary.
  • 02/11/19 World Politics Review

    Christine Wade, Professor of Political Science and International Studies and an expert in Latin American politics, was on site in El Salvador for the recent elections, when voters elected 37-year-old Nayib Bukele as the country’s next president. Her analysis is the lead story in this week’s World Politics Review.

  • 02/01/19 The Baltimore Sun

    Melissa Deckman, Professor and Chair of Political Science, is quoted in The Baltimore Sun about whether Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan may run as a Republican against President Donald Trump in the 2020 election. Deckman says it’s unrealistic to think Hogan will run, because the majority of rank-and-file Republican voters still support Trump.

  • 01/20/19 Scientific American

    Aaron Krochmal, Associate Professor of Biology, and his colleague from Franklin & Marshall, Tim Roth, Associate Professor of Psychology, co-wrote a story in Scientific American about their collaborative research into how turtles learn to migrate. “They’re not as charismatic as sea turtles,” the pair writes, “and they sure don’t travel as far (several kilometers for a painted turtle versus several thousand kilometers for a sea turtle), but what they lack in outward charisma they make up in tenacity.”

  • 01/31/19 World Politics Review

    Christine Wade, Professor of Political Science and International Studies and an expert on Latin American politics, writes her latest column in World Politics Review on the continuing degeneration of the state of Nicaragua, where President Daniel Ortega has implemented the same reforms that last year triggered widespread protests and led to a brutal government crackdown.

  • 012/20/18 Maryland Natural Resources Magazine

    Maryland’s Department of Natural Resources features the College’s Natural Lands Project on the cover of its latest Maryland Natural Resource magazine. Interviewing NLP coordinator Dan Small, the story highlighted a partnership at the Sassafras River Natural Resources Management Area between the Maryland Park Service and the College’s Center for Environment & Society to convert 83 acres of row crops to 80 acres of upland meadow, two acres of walking trails, and an acre of hedgerows, all of which will enhance restoration of bobwhite quail to the area.

  • 01/11/19: WAVY

    Adam Goodheart, Director of the Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience and author of 1861: The Civil War Awakening, is interviewed by WAVY in Hampton, Virginia, about the historic significance of Fort Monroe. Goodheart says the fort may be called “the Ellis Island for African Americans,” because of the thousands of slaves who escaped to the Union-held fort during the Civil War.

  • 01/04/19 The Washington Post

    Adam Goodheart, Director of the Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, reviews David Blight’s new biography of Frederick Douglass in The Washington Post. Goodheart says that Blight’s work, Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom, captures “the complexities of … a figure both eminent and solitary who gazed across vastly different American landscapes.” Blight spoke at Washington College’s Convocation in February 2018, where he was awarded the College’s Award for Excellence, and Douglass was awarded a posthumous honorary degree Doctor of Laws.

  • 12/11/18 History News Network

    History Professor Richard Striner writes about changes in the Republican party in his latest column for History News Network. The presidency of Donald Trump and the Republican party that he has taken control of, Striner writes, have their roots in the 1990s when Republican lawmakers like Newt Gingrich began “scorched-earth tactics” to nullify the presidency of Bill Clinton.

  • 12/7/18 Smithsonian.com

    Adam Goodheart, Director of the Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, is quoted in Smithsonian.com in a story about John Allen Chau, the young evangelist who illegally traveled to North Sentinel Island in the Bay of Bengal and was killed by the island’s isolated native people. Goodheart had previously traveled to the island and wrote an historical account of the islanders, which this story also quotes.

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  • 02/01/19 WBOC

    College President Kurt Landgraf is interviewed by WBOC about the potential closure of the hospital in Chestertown. Landgraf says that the hospital’s fate becomes a key economic development issue for the town and the county, as, for example, fewer young faculty will want to come and work at the College and make Chestertown and Kent County their home.

  • 12/15/18 The Weather Channel
    Aaron Krochmal, Associate Professor of Biology, was featured on LiveScience about his ongoing studies of how turtles navigate, and how memory and learning is part of that process. Within 24 hours this story was picked up worldwide and had reached over 12.5 million readers, including a segment on The Weather Channel
  • 10/11/18 The Chestertown Spy

    Matt Palmer, Lecturer in Guitar and an organizer of the Department of Music’s annual Eastern Shore Guitar Festival, is the subject of a Chestertown Spy video interview discussing the versatility of the guitar and the broad diversity of the festival, which brings scores of young classical guitar players to study and perform at the College with maestro performers.

  • 07/18/18 Al Jazeera

    Christine Wade, Professor of Political Science and International Studies and an expert on Latin American politics, is interviewed on Al Jazeera about the recent outbreak of violence in Nicaragua. She says the government was caught by surprise that the protests were so widespread, which is one reason the response was so violent, and she doubts that there will be a successful effort at early elections to oust President Daniel Ortega before the end of his term.

  • 07/31/18 The Chestertown Spy

    Katherine Maynard, Professor of French, is interviewed by the Chestertown Spy about her role in the nonpartisan group Vote Your Voice, which is working to educate people in Kent and northern Queen Anne’s counties about the importance of becoming politically active and exercising their right to vote, especially in the upcoming mid-terms elections.

  • 05/09/18 The Chestertown Spy

    The Chestertown Spy writes about the search for the “real” Sophie Kerr, interviewing Brooke Schultz ’18, the outgoing editor of The Elm who researched the progressive nature of Kerr’s writing for her senior thesis, as well as Elizabeth O’Connor, Assistant professor of English, and Heather Calloway, Archivist and Special Collections Librarian. The three are interviewed via video, talking about their research into the prolific yet elusive Eastern Shore writer whose gift to the College created the Sophie Kerr Prize, the nation’s largest undergraduate literary award.

  • 04/11/18 RTE “Big Week on the Farm”

    Bill Schindler, Director of the Eastern Shore Food Lab and Associate Professor of Anthropology, is featured on RTE’s “Big Week on the Farm,” discussing his take on the latest in the “test-tube hamburger.” This line of research uses stem cells from an animal’s muscle tissue to “grow” meat in a laboratory. Some see this research as a more sustainable and ethical way to produce enough meat for the growing human population. 

  • 04/11/18 RTE’s “Big Week on the Farm”
    Bill Schindler, Director of the Eastern Shore Food Lab and Associate Professor of Anthropology, is featured in this segment of RTE’s “Big Week on the Farm.” He explains the most nutrient-dense parts of an animal—such as the brains, liver, and even intestines—as well as how often those are thrown away, and how a nose-to-tail approach to eating an animal is more ethical as well as better for your health. 

  • 03/08/18 RTE What Are You Eating?

    Bill Schindler, Director of the Eastern Shore Food Lab and Associate Professor of Anthropology, is interviewed by host Philip Boucher-Hayes on this segment of RTE’s “What Are You Eating?” about whether humans are meant to eat meat, and how humans first began to hunt for meat instead of scavenging. Filmed in Ireland’s Wicklow Woods, the segment includes Mike Whisenant ’16, now studying for his master’s in experimental archaeology at University College Dublin, and Maggie Kobik ’11, who just finished her master’s degree at UCD, helping butcher a deer with stone tools.

  • March 10: The Chestertown Spy

    John Thomas, lecturer in music, is interviewed by The Chestertown Spy about his work as the program manager at The Mainstay in Rock Hall, in particular about the revival of chamber music in a 21st-century form. He discusses the music and work of young artists who are bringing new perspectives to musical forms of the classical world and making it much more accessible and appealing to people.

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  • 02/08/19 Two Weeks Notice: A Latin American Politics Blog

    Christine Wade, Professor of Political Science and International Studies and an expert in Latin American politics, is interviewed on Podcast Episode 63 of “Two Weeks Notice: A Latin American Politics Blog,” about the Salvadoran presidential election. Wade, who has been observing elections in El Salvador for nearly 20 years, witnessed the historic election of 37-year-old Nayib Bukele, and in this podcast talks about why he won, what issues the two dominant parties face, and the role of ideology.

  • 11/01/18 WAMU

    Melissa Deckman, Chair and Professor of Political Science, is interviewed by WAMU in a story about the difficulties that Democratic gubernatorial candidate Ben Jealous has had in getting his message out to voters.

  • 10/30/18 WAMU

    Melissa Deckman, Chair and Professor of Political Science, is interviewed on WAMU for a story about how incumbent Republican Governor Larry Hogan will need Democrat’s support to keep his office. Deckman says Hogan “has governed as the anti-Trump,” which has made him stand out among Republicans and makes him more attractive to Maryland voters across party lines.

  • 10/01/18 Learn True Health
    Bill Schindler, Director of the Eastern Shore Food Lab and Associate Professor of Anthropology, is featured on the Learn True Health podcast, talking about how ancestral diets can be used to inform our current food culture and technologies.
  • 09/26/18 Peak Human

    Bill Schindler, Director of the Eastern Shore Food Lab and Associate Professor of Anthropology, is interviewed on the Peak Human podcast about human development, how it tracked with food technology, ancient food preparation, and using those techniques to inform current health and food technologies.

  • 08/17/18 The Academic Minute, Inside Higher Ed

    On day 5 of “Washington College Week” on The Academic Minute, Jennie Carr, Assistant Professor of Biology, describes her work at the College’s River and Field Campus studying the nesting and feeding behavior of field sparrows. Carr’s long-term study is helping learn the factors that contribute to nest failure for the birds, whose population has declined 65 percent from 1966 to 2010.

  • 08/16/18 The Academic Minute, Inside Higher Ed
    On day 4 of “Washington College Week” on The Academic Minute, Rachel Durso, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Black Studies, explains how her research with students and a collaboration with the College’s GIS Lab is helping the Mid-Shore Council on Family Violence better identify and help victims of domestic violence on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.
  • 08/14/18 The Academic Minute, Inside Higher Ed

    On Day 3 of “Washington College Week” on The Academic Minute, Bill Schindler, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Eastern Shore Food Lab, talks about how our ancestors were far better at choosing and preparing a healthier diet than today’s humans. The Academic Minute is published in Inside Higher Ed and airs on public radio stations across the country.

  • 08/14/18 Inside Higher Ed, The Academic Minute

    On Day 2 of “Washington College Week” on The Academic Minute, Melissa Deckman, Chair and Professor of Political Science, discusses how young women are more involved in politics and more engaged in civic issues than in the past, potentially fundamentally changing the political landscape.

  • 08/13/18 Inside Higher Ed, The Academic Minute

    “Washington College Week” of the Association of American Colleges and Universities’ “Academic Minute” starts off with Aaron Lampman, Chair and Associate Professor of Anthropology, explaining research that he and students are doing into the perception of risk of sea level rise in the most vulnerable communities on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. The Academic Minute is published in Inside Higher Ed and airs on public radio stations across the country.