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WC in the News

The media turns to our faculty experts to enhance coverage of a wide range of topics, from international security and economic policy to American history and politics. 

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  • 11/14/18 Proceedings of the Royal Society

    The continuing research of Aaron Krochmal, Associate Professor of Biology, has landed in the prestigious Proceedings of the Royal Society again, this time for work he and his colleague Timothy Roth of Franklin & Marshall College have done in better defining the role of cognitive experiences in animal navigation—specifically, in Eastern painted turtles. Using a novel, tailor-made chemical method, the scientists have identified the specific brain receptor that migrating turtles use to form and recall spatial memories of migration, which seems to be the same as used in humans for similar purposes. This highlights the deep evolutionary roots of complex cognition. They’ve also unraveled the mechanism behind the critical learning period—an age-specific window when the turtles are capable of cognitive learning, not unlike humans. 

  • 11/13/18 World Politics Review

    Christine Wade, Professor of Political Science and International Studies and an expert in Latin American politics, writes in her latest column for World Politics Review that the U.S. bears some responsibility for the migrant crisis in Central America and must help solve it.

  • 11/7/18 WAMU

    Looking at the key takeaways from the gubernatorial election in Maryland, WAMU quotes Melissa Deckman, Chair and Professor of Political Science, about how the loss by Ben Jealous will provoke soul-searching among Democrats. Deckman says that right now, the state’s Democrats lack a clear vision or message.

  • 11/08/18 Mic

    Melissa Deckman, Chair and Professor of Political Science, is quoted in Mic about Democrats’ difficulty in winning over many white Republican women in the mid-term elections. Deckman says that using gender politics can frequently backfire among white Republican women, who more broadly oppose feminism and issues like abortion rights and LGBTQ rights.

  • 10/26/18 The Baltimore Sun

    The Baltimore Sun writes about Republicans’ efforts to flip five seats in the state’s Senate, which would end Democrat’s supermajority in the General Assembly. Melissa Deckman, Chair and Professor of Political Science, says that if they succeed, it will mark a major victory for the GOP in Maryland.

  • 10/12/18 The New York Times

    Melissa Deckman, Chair and Professor of Political Science and an expert with Gender Watch 2018, is quoted in The New York Times in a news analysis discussing how conservative female supporters of President Donald Trump and Brett Kavanaugh are not betraying their gender, but rather prioritizing what they care about. Deckman says that her analysis of female voters in June found that gender equality, while among the top priorities for Democratic women, was among the lowest priorities among Republican women.

  • 10/11/18 The Washington Post

    The Washington Post launches a new initiative called About US, which covers issues of identity in the United States. In this story about white female voters who voted for Donald Trump and resentment against them resurfacing in the wake of Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court, Melissa Deckman, Chair and Professor of Political Science, says many women felt “betrayed” by Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) who voted in favor of Kavanaugh’s nomination, even though “In the past, she’s been a voice for saying, ‘We need to consider women’s voices more in a party that doesn’t do that very often.’ ”

  • 10/10/18 World Politics Review

    In her latest column for World Politics Review, Christine Wade, Professor of Political Science and International Studies and an expert on Latin American politics, writes about the situation in Nicaragua after what President Daniel Ortega has described as an attempted coup.

  • 10/05/18 The Hill
    Melissa Deckman, Chair and Professor of Political Science and an expert on gender in politics, is quoted in “State of the Race,” a weekly feature on The Hill and MSN.com, in a story about how no Democrats running in House races are embracing an anti-abortion rights platform, a major change from 2006. Deckman says the shift is indicative of the larger polarization within the political parties, and that abortion rights—for or against—is seen now as a litmus test for candidates in both parties.
  • 10/05/18 Politico

    Politico writes a story about how the number of women leaving the Republican party has been slowly increasing for two decades, but under the Trump presidency that exodus is growing rapidly. Melissa Deckman, Chair and Professor of Political Science and an expert with Gender Watch 2018, says that while these shifts may seem subtle, they could make a big difference in the upcoming mid-term elections.

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  • 10/11/18 The Chestertown Spy

    Matt Palmer, Lecturer in Guitar and an organizer of the Department of Music’s annual Eastern Shore Guitar Festival, is the subject of a Chestertown Spy video interview discussing the versatility of the guitar and the broad diversity of the festival, which brings scores of young classical guitar players to study and perform at the College with maestro performers.

  • 07/18/18 Al Jazeera

    Christine Wade, Professor of Political Science and International Studies and an expert on Latin American politics, is interviewed on Al Jazeera about the recent outbreak of violence in Nicaragua. She says the government was caught by surprise that the protests were so widespread, which is one reason the response was so violent, and she doubts that there will be a successful effort at early elections to oust President Daniel Ortega before the end of his term.

  • 07/31/18 The Chestertown Spy

    Katherine Maynard, Professor of French, is interviewed by the Chestertown Spy about her role in the nonpartisan group Vote Your Voice, which is working to educate people in Kent and northern Queen Anne’s counties about the importance of becoming politically active and exercising their right to vote, especially in the upcoming mid-terms elections.

  • 05/09/18 The Chestertown Spy

    The Chestertown Spy writes about the search for the “real” Sophie Kerr, interviewing Brooke Schultz ’18, the outgoing editor of The Elm who researched the progressive nature of Kerr’s writing for her senior thesis, as well as Elizabeth O’Connor, Assistant professor of English, and Heather Calloway, Archivist and Special Collections Librarian. The three are interviewed via video, talking about their research into the prolific yet elusive Eastern Shore writer whose gift to the College created the Sophie Kerr Prize, the nation’s largest undergraduate literary award.

  • 04/11/18 RTE “Big Week on the Farm”

    Bill Schindler, Director of the Eastern Shore Food Lab and Associate Professor of Anthropology, is featured on RTE’s “Big Week on the Farm,” discussing his take on the latest in the “test-tube hamburger.” This line of research uses stem cells from an animal’s muscle tissue to “grow” meat in a laboratory. Some see this research as a more sustainable and ethical way to produce enough meat for the growing human population. 

  • 04/11/18 RTE’s “Big Week on the Farm”
    Bill Schindler, Director of the Eastern Shore Food Lab and Associate Professor of Anthropology, is featured in this segment of RTE’s “Big Week on the Farm.” He explains the most nutrient-dense parts of an animal—such as the brains, liver, and even intestines—as well as how often those are thrown away, and how a nose-to-tail approach to eating an animal is more ethical as well as better for your health. 

  • 03/08/18 RTE What Are You Eating?

    Bill Schindler, Director of the Eastern Shore Food Lab and Associate Professor of Anthropology, is interviewed by host Philip Boucher-Hayes on this segment of RTE’s “What Are You Eating?” about whether humans are meant to eat meat, and how humans first began to hunt for meat instead of scavenging. Filmed in Ireland’s Wicklow Woods, the segment includes Mike Whisenant ’16, now studying for his master’s in experimental archaeology at University College Dublin, and Maggie Kobik ’11, who just finished her master’s degree at UCD, helping butcher a deer with stone tools.

  • March 10: The Chestertown Spy

    John Thomas, lecturer in music, is interviewed by The Chestertown Spy about his work as the program manager at The Mainstay in Rock Hall, in particular about the revival of chamber music in a 21st-century form. He discusses the music and work of young artists who are bringing new perspectives to musical forms of the classical world and making it much more accessible and appealing to people.

  • 02/28/18 WBAL-TV

    Melissa Deckman, Chair and Professor of Political Science, is interviewed on WBAL-TV Baltimore about the role of women in Maryland’s upcoming gubernatorial election. Of the nine Democratic candidates, seven have chosen women as running mates, which Deckman believes is a direct result of the national trends of #MeToo and the women’s march and is further evidence of candidates’ acknowledgement of the increasingly powerful of the female vote.

  • 10/23/17 the Chestertown Spy

    Heather Harvey, associate professor of art and chair of the Department of Art and Art History, is interviewed in The Chestertown Spy about her collaboration with fellow artist Elizabeth Casqueiro to create The Davis Arts Center in Easton, a permanent space for working artists in a former industrial building.

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  • 11/01/18 WAMU

    Melissa Deckman, Chair and Professor of Political Science, is interviewed by WAMU in a story about the difficulties that Democratic gubernatorial candidate Ben Jealous has had in getting his message out to voters.

  • 10/30/18 WAMU

    Melissa Deckman, Chair and Professor of Political Science, is interviewed on WAMU for a story about how incumbent Republican Governor Larry Hogan will need Democrat’s support to keep his office. Deckman says Hogan “has governed as the anti-Trump,” which has made him stand out among Republicans and makes him more attractive to Maryland voters across party lines.

  • 10/01/18 Learn True Health
    Bill Schindler, Director of the Eastern Shore Food Lab and Associate Professor of Anthropology, is featured on the Learn True Health podcast, talking about how ancestral diets can be used to inform our current food culture and technologies.
  • 09/26/18 Peak Human

    Bill Schindler, Director of the Eastern Shore Food Lab and Associate Professor of Anthropology, is interviewed on the Peak Human podcast about human development, how it tracked with food technology, ancient food preparation, and using those techniques to inform current health and food technologies.

  • 08/17/18 The Academic Minute, Inside Higher Ed

    On day 5 of “Washington College Week” on The Academic Minute, Jennie Carr, Assistant Professor of Biology, describes her work at the College’s River and Field Campus studying the nesting and feeding behavior of field sparrows. Carr’s long-term study is helping learn the factors that contribute to nest failure for the birds, whose population has declined 65 percent from 1966 to 2010.

  • 08/16/18 The Academic Minute, Inside Higher Ed
    On day 4 of “Washington College Week” on The Academic Minute, Rachel Durso, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Black Studies, explains how her research with students and a collaboration with the College’s GIS Lab is helping the Mid-Shore Council on Family Violence better identify and help victims of domestic violence on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.
  • 08/14/18 The Academic Minute, Inside Higher Ed

    On Day 3 of “Washington College Week” on The Academic Minute, Bill Schindler, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Eastern Shore Food Lab, talks about how our ancestors were far better at choosing and preparing a healthier diet than today’s humans. The Academic Minute is published in Inside Higher Ed and airs on public radio stations across the country.

  • 08/14/18 Inside Higher Ed, The Academic Minute

    On Day 2 of “Washington College Week” on The Academic Minute, Melissa Deckman, Chair and Professor of Political Science, discusses how young women are more involved in politics and more engaged in civic issues than in the past, potentially fundamentally changing the political landscape.

  • 08/13/18 Inside Higher Ed, The Academic Minute

    “Washington College Week” of the Association of American Colleges and Universities’ “Academic Minute” starts off with Aaron Lampman, Chair and Associate Professor of Anthropology, explaining research that he and students are doing into the perception of risk of sea level rise in the most vulnerable communities on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. The Academic Minute is published in Inside Higher Ed and airs on public radio stations across the country.

  • 06/15/18 Understanding Latin American Politics: The Podcast

    Christine Wade, Professor of Political Science and International Studies and an editor of Latin American Politics and Development, 9th edition, is interviewed about the ongoing crisis in Nicaragua on the podcast “Two Weeks Notice: Understanding Latin American Politics.” Wade talks about the generalized chaos that is consuming the country, which is disrupting people’s everyday lives, in addition to the extensive violence and arguments between the government led by President Daniel Ortega and the opposition alliance over who is responsible.