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WC in the News

The media turns to our faculty experts to enhance coverage of a wide range of topics, from international security and economic policy to American history and politics. 

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  • 07/12/18 World Politics Review

    The corruption scandals “consuming El Salvador” continue with the recent arrest warrants for former president Mauricio Funes and members of his family and staff, says Christine Wade, Professor of Political Science and International Studies, in her latest column in World Politics Review. Wade, author of Captured Peace: Elites and Peacebuilding in El Salvador, writes that the troubled country’s history of impunity is hampering the continuing struggle against corruption in government.

  • 07/05/18 The Washington Times

    Christine Wade, Professor of Political Science and International Studies and an expert on Latin American politics, is quoted in The Washington Times about the future of Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega, who is facing intense public opposition to his autocratic rule and the violent clampdown that has killed nearly 300 protesters since spring. Wade warns that Ortega’s administration, while weighing an exit strategy that could include early elections, is made up of battle-hardened “old-guard revolutionaries” who may have a siege mentality that influences their strategy.

  • 06/25/18 Bay Journal

    The Natural Lands Project, led by the Center for Environment & Society and project coordinator Dan Small, is the topic of this story in the Bay Journal. Reporter Timothy Wheeler and photographer Dave Harp spent a day at the College’s River and Field Campus looking for (and finding) bobwhite quail and learning about the innovative project that helps landowners find a balance between agriculture and wildlife habitat while also creating buffers that filter polluted runoff before it reaches the Chesapeake and its tributaries.

  • 06/21/18 The Baltimore Sun

    Melissa Deckman, Chair and Professor of Political Science, is interviewed in The Baltimore Sun about the upcoming Maryland gubernatorial election and the Democratic primary. Deckman says that the choice before voters among the six Democratic challengers has to do more with personality and style than with policy, and the candidate they choose will determine the tenor of the race against Republican incumbent Larry Hogan.

  • 06/15/18 InSight Crime

    Christine Wade, Professor of Political Science and International Studies and author of Captured Peace: Elites and Peacebuilding in El Salvador, is quoted in this analysis in Insight Crime about the explosive report from the internationally-backed Support Mission Against Corruption and Impunity in Honduras, alleging that millions of dollars of public money was diverted for political purposes. Wade says that the anti-corruption efforts have an uphill climb, since so many elites in Honduras “have had nothing but disdain for the MACCIH and have tried to completely undermine its investigatory capacity.”

  • 05/30/18 InSight Crime

    Christine Wade, Professor of Political Science and International Studies and an expert on Central American politics, is quoted in InSight Crime about the threat to maintaining the Support Mission Against Corruption and Impunity in Honduras, which is investigating various corruption cases. Wade says that without the internationally supported anti-corruption body at work, it’s very unlikely such investigations will continue in Honduras, even though the group’s mandate has been weak from the outset.

  • 05/24/18 Radio France International

    Christine Wade, Professor of Political Science and International Studies and an expert on Central American politics, is interviewed on Radio France International’s Paris Live AM program about the recent breakdown of the national dialogue process in Nicaragua. This is a print version of the interview; in the radio version, Wade’s interview starts at 2:10 in the program and runs for about four minutes.

  • 05/24/18 The Baltimore Sun

    In an op-ed for The Baltimore Sun, Melissa Deckman, Chair and Professor of Political Science, and Mileah Kromer, director of the Sarah T. Hughes Field Politics Center at Goucher College, write about how having more women running for public office—and winning—is good for governance, whether local, state, or federal.

  • 05/17/18 Truthout

    Christine Wade, Professor of Political Science and International Studies and author of Captured Peace: Elites and Peacebuilding in El Salvador, is interviewed in this Truthout story about Honduran forces attacking civilian environmental activists who were protesting a hydroelectric project in Pajuiles, Honduras. Wade notes that Honduran security forces trained and backed by the U.S., like the COBRAS and TIGRES special forces, have been “implicated in human rights violations” over the last few decades, and unless the U.S. stops supporting these groups, human rights abuses at their hands will continue.

  • 05/16/18 Ms.Blog

    Melissa Deckman, Chair and Professor of Political Science and an expert with Gender Watch 2018, writes on Ms.Blog about the #MeToo movement and the upcoming midterm elections. She analyzes the results of a survey by the Public Religion Research Institute, of which she chairs the board, about people’s attitudes toward sexual harassment and if and how it would influence their vote in congressional elections. Among other results, she says the survey indicates that “Americans who trend Democratic in their voting behavior are far more likely to believe that sexual harassment is a serious problem,” and that even if Republican women are concerned about sexual harassment, that concern likely won’t influence them to vote against their party’s candidate.

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  • 05/09/18 The Chestertown Spy

    The Chestertown Spy writes about the search for the “real” Sophie Kerr, interviewing Brooke Schultz ’18, the outgoing editor of The Elm who researched the progressive nature of Kerr’s writing for her senior thesis, as well as Elizabeth O’Connor, Assistant professor of English, and Heather Calloway, Archivist and Special Collections Librarian. The three are interviewed via video, talking about their research into the prolific yet elusive Eastern Shore writer whose gift to the College created the Sophie Kerr Prize, the nation’s largest undergraduate literary award.

  • 04/11/18 RTE “Big Week on the Farm”

    Bill Schindler, Director of the Eastern Shore Food Lab and Associate Professor of Anthropology, is featured on RTE’s “Big Week on the Farm,” discussing his take on the latest in the “test-tube hamburger.” This line of research uses stem cells from an animal’s muscle tissue to “grow” meat in a laboratory. Some see this research as a more sustainable and ethical way to produce enough meat for the growing human population. 

  • 04/11/18 RTE’s “Big Week on the Farm”
    Bill Schindler, Director of the Eastern Shore Food Lab and Associate Professor of Anthropology, is featured in this segment of RTE’s “Big Week on the Farm.” He explains the most nutrient-dense parts of an animal—such as the brains, liver, and even intestines—as well as how often those are thrown away, and how a nose-to-tail approach to eating an animal is more ethical as well as better for your health. 

  • 03/08/18 RTE What Are You Eating?

    Bill Schindler, Director of the Eastern Shore Food Lab and Associate Professor of Anthropology, is interviewed by host Philip Boucher-Hayes on this segment of RTE’s “What Are You Eating?” about whether humans are meant to eat meat, and how humans first began to hunt for meat instead of scavenging. Filmed in Ireland’s Wicklow Woods, the segment includes Mike Whisenant ’16, now studying for his master’s in experimental archaeology at University College Dublin, and Maggie Kobik ’11, who just finished her master’s degree at UCD, helping butcher a deer with stone tools.

  • March 10: The Chestertown Spy

    John Thomas, lecturer in music, is interviewed by The Chestertown Spy about his work as the program manager at The Mainstay in Rock Hall, in particular about the revival of chamber music in a 21st-century form. He discusses the music and work of young artists who are bringing new perspectives to musical forms of the classical world and making it much more accessible and appealing to people.

  • 02/28/18 WBAL-TV

    Melissa Deckman, Chair and Professor of Political Science, is interviewed on WBAL-TV Baltimore about the role of women in Maryland’s upcoming gubernatorial election. Of the nine Democratic candidates, seven have chosen women as running mates, which Deckman believes is a direct result of the national trends of #MeToo and the women’s march and is further evidence of candidates’ acknowledgement of the increasingly powerful of the female vote.

  • 10/23/17 the Chestertown Spy

    Heather Harvey, associate professor of art and chair of the Department of Art and Art History, is interviewed in The Chestertown Spy about her collaboration with fellow artist Elizabeth Casqueiro to create The Davis Arts Center in Easton, a permanent space for working artists in a former industrial building.

  • 09/27/17 Washington Ideas

    Bill Schindler, associate professor of anthropology and director of the new Eastern Shore Food Lab, is interviewed about his teaching of primitive technologies by Ross Andersen, senior editor at The Atlantic, at Washington Ideas. Sponsored by The Atlantic, the annual three-day event brings the nation’s leaders in politics, education, science, business, and health for interviews and conversation.

  • 07/17/17: The Chestertown Spy interviewed President Kurt Landgraf last week for well over half an hour. Here’s a six-minute excerpt of that conversation, along with a brief introductory news article.
  • 06/01/17 The New York Times
    College President Sheila Bair is a featured speaker at the New York Times Higher Ed Leaders Forum, and in this interview with moderator Andrew Ross Sorkin.

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  • 06/15/18 Understanding Latin American Politics: The Podcast

    Christine Wade, Professor of Political Science and International Studies and an editor of Latin American Politics and Development, 9th edition, is interviewed about the ongoing crisis in Nicaragua on the podcast “Two Weeks Notice: Understanding Latin American Politics.” Wade talks about the generalized chaos that is consuming the country, which is disrupting people’s everyday lives, in addition to the extensive violence and arguments between the government led by President Daniel Ortega and the opposition alliance over who is responsible.

  • 05/17/18 The Best Possible Taste
    Bill Schindler, Director of the Eastern Shore Food Lab and Associate Professor of anthropology, is interviewed on Ireland’s radio program “The Best Possible Taste” hosted by Sharon Noonan. Noonan talks to Schindler about his talk at the Burren Slow Food Festival where, she says, “he enthralled an audience with his presentation ‘Human diet: Learning to Eat Again.’ ’’ During the interview, Schindler summarizes his talk about how the past instructs us about how we should be eating better today. Schindler’s interview starts at 34:20.
  • 04/19/18 WYPR “Roughly Speaking”

    Melissa Deckman, Chair and Professor of Political Science, is interviewed on WYPR’s “Roughly Speaking” with Dan Rodricks, about how and why a majority of white evangelical Christians has continued to maintain and even grow its support for President Donald Trump, despite the revelations about Trump’s alleged affair with adult film star Stormy Daniels, questions about his business dealings, and doubts about his moral compass.

  • 03/01/18 Maryland News Network

    The lack of women in Maryland’s congressional seats is the topic of this talk by Melissa Deckman, Chair and Professor of Political Science, on the Maryland News Network. At the state level, she says, Maryland ranks fairly high nationally, with about a third of the seats in the General Assembly occupied by women.

  • 01/20/18 Citizens’ Climate Lobby
    Grant Samms, Project Coordinator for the Center for Environment & Society’s ShorePower Project, is interviewed by Peterson Toscano on the Citizens’ Climate Lobby podcast about how it’s essential that climate adcocates understand how “sense of place” plays a big role in a community’s response to new ideas and alternative energy sources like wind power.
  • 12/15/17 “With Relish”

    Bill Schindler, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Eastern Shore Food Lab, is interviewed on the Irish podcast “With Relish” about his work at University College Dublin and returning to the real roots of food. He talks about the Eastern Shore Food Lab and how the Food Evolutions project is helping inform that. Schindler’s portion of the interview begins at 24:05.

  • 01/04/18 Two Weeks Notice: A Latin American Politics Blog

    Christine Wade, Professor of Political Science and International Studies and author of Captured Peace: Elites and Peacebuilding in El Salvador, is interviewed on Two Weeks Notice: A Latin American Politics blog, about the situation in Honduras after the controversial 2017 presidential election.

  • 12/15/17 WWL Radio New Orleans

    WWL Radio host Tommy Tucker in New Orleans interviews Melissa Deckman, Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science, about the #MeToo movement and its political effects. Deckman says that although the #MeToo movement represents a powerful cultural change, she does not believe the Republican-controlled Congress will do anything to pursue an investigation into allegations from women against Donald Trump that he sexually assaulted or molested them before he became president.

  • 12/11/17 The BBC World News Service

    Christine Wade, Professor of Political Science and International Studies, is interviewed on the BBC World Service NewsHour about the continuing turmoil in Honduras since the the presidential election remains in dispute. She says although international election monitors are on site in Honduras, there are demands to nullify the election or do a total vote recount due to polling irregularities. The segment runs from 14:00 to 18:05.

  • 12/01/17 WYPR’s “Midday” with Tom Hall
    Katie Charles, Assistant Professor of 18th- and 19th-Century Literature, is interviewed by Tom Hall on WYPR’s Midday Program about how Charles Dickens wrote A Christmas Carol and how his primary intention with the story was to draw attention to the plight of the poor. The interview, along with Kay MacIntosh, Economic Development & Marketing Coordinating for Chestertown, coincided with the new “Dickens of a Christmas” celebration in Chestertown.