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Courses and Requirements

Courses and Requirements

The major in English is the study of the arts of literature. Although the emphasis is on critical analysis of great works, students will also gain an understanding of the historical development of literature written in English.  Every semester, you have the freedom to choose the courses that interest you most, with no required sequences of classes!Students who major or minor in English at Washington College…

  • Indulge their passion for reading and writing
  • Benefit from small class sizes and lively discussions
  • Become part of a vibrant community of scholars and writers
  • Complete flexible course requirements that prepare them for a wide-variety of career options, including writing, editing, teaching, law, and advertising, just to name a few possibilities

The English department also serves as the home for the minors in Creative Writing and Journalism, Editing & Publishing.
These two minors are designed to pair well with each other, with the English major, and with other majors across the college!

Checklist: English Major     

Checklist: Creative Writing Minor

Checklist: English Minor      

Checklist: Journalism, Editing & Publishing Minor

Past Courses & Distribution 

Qualtrics form for sign-in for literary events for CRW and JEP minors

Embrace your inner child with this study of literature geared toward children and young adults!

Think you know what the Middle Ages are? Find out if you're right in this course!

Dig into documentaries - and create your own - with The Art of Rhetoric!

Put away your traditional essays, and get into these experimental form!

Step back in time 100 years and explore Modernism!

Build your fiction portfolios in a flash with Flash Fiction!

Check out African American Lit in this course that reaches a wide range of disciplines!

Want to work on a literary journal? Here is the gateway to our very own Cherry Tree!

Sample 200 years' worth of Brit Lit, and learn about the cultural phenomena that influenced the writing!

Focus in on the bursting African American creative and intellectual movement of the 20s & 30s - the Harlem Renaissance!

Light a candle and jump into these spooky novels from the 19th century!

You’re probably familiar with fiction, but how has it evolved? And what does the real world have to do with anything? Find out in Intro to Fiction!

Do you have an interest in creative writing? That's all you need to jump into this course!

Hone your journalistic skills with Features and Opinions!

Choose from FOUR sections for Literature and Composition!

Check out this course that *technically* counts for your pre-1800s requirement, even though it crosses the line a tiny bit!

Calling all Shakespearians! Check out the Bard's later plays this spring!

Dive into American studies with this course that counts for TWO majors!

Calling all journalists! Get into the news with Intro to Journalism!

 

Courses that Count for the W2 Requirement in Fall 2021

ENG 101: Literature and Composition.  This course develops the student’s capacity for intelligent reading, critical analysis, and writing through the study of literature. There are frequent writing assignments, as well as individual conferences on the student’s writing.  Counts for Humanities distribution and W2 requirement.
  • ENG 101-11: Literature and Composition, Meehan, TuTh 8:30-9:45am
  • ENG 101-12: Literature and Composition, DeProspo, TuTh 10:00-11:15am
ENG 103: Introduction to Creative Writing.  A workshop introducing new writers to several forms of creative writing, including poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Students will use classic and contemporary literature as models for their own efforts.  Counts for Creative Writing minor, Journalism, Editing & Publishing minor, W2 requirement.
  • ENG 103-10: Intro to Creative Writing, Abdur-Rahman, TuTH  10:00-11:15am
  • ENG 103-11: Intro to Creative Writing, Kesey MW 2:30-3:45pm
ENG 224. Introduction to Journalism.  This course will cover the foundations of reporting, writing, fact checking, and editing. Students will write a range of news and feature stories, including an obituary, an event, and a profile. We will also discuss journalistic ethics and the way the field has been transformed by the Internet.  Counts for Journalism, Editing, & Publishing minor, Humanities distribution, and W2 requirement.
  • ENG 224-10: Intro to Journalism, O'Connor, MWF 10:30-11:20

Distribution Credit In English

Students can fullfill the Humanities Distribution requirement with ANY 100-level or 200-level course in English except ENG 103: Intro to Creative Writing.

Courses that Count for the Humanities Requirement in Fall 2021

Counts for Humanities distribution and W2 requirement.

ENG 101: Literature and Composition.  This course develops the student’s capacity for intelligent reading, critical analysis, and writing through the study of literature. There are frequent writing assignments, as well as individual conferences on the student’s writing.  

  • ENG 101-11: Literature and Composition, Meehan, TuTh 8:30-9:45am
  • ENG 101-12: Literature and Composition, DeProspo, TuTh 10:00-11:15am

Counts for Medieval and Early Modern Studies minor, Theatre and Dance major, Humanities distribution, and English major pre-1800 requirement.

ENG 205.  Shakespeare I.  This course examines some of Shakespeare's best known earlier plays (those written before the death of Queen Elizabeth in 1603) both in the context of early modern English culture and as play scripts/performances.  This class will examine a number of these exciting works through a variety of lenses from gender to performance history.  

  • ENG 205-10, Shakespeare I, Fox, TuTh 1:00-2:15pm

Counts for American Studies major and Humanities distribution.

AMS/ENG 209.  Introduction to American Literature I.  Taught in the fall semester, the course is concerned with the establishment of American Studies as a curriculum in post-World War II American colleges and universities. Readings will include a variety of written texts, including those not traditionally considered literary, as well as a variety of other-than-written materials, including popular cultural ones, in accordance with the original commitment of American Studies to curricular innovation. Introductions to the modern phenomena of race, gender, sexual orientation, generation, and class in U.S. culture will be included. A comparatist perspective on the influence of American culture internationally and a review of the international American Studies movement in foreign universities will also be introduced.  

  • AMS/ENG 210-10, Intro to American Literature & Culture I, DeProspo, TuTh 11:30-12:45

Counts for Humanities distribution, English major, English minor, and Gender Studies minor.

ENG 216. Greek and Roman Mythology.  This course will explore the rich literary and cultural heritage of Greek and Roman mythology, exploring the stories that have inspired everything from the Percy Jackson series to DC's Wonder Woman, Disney's Hercules to Netflix's Blood of Zeus, and more.  We will explore classical mythology in several major literary genres, including drama, epic, and poetry, spending much of our time on Ovid's Metamorphoses and Homer's Odyssey.  We will discuss the history, geography, art and architecture of the ancient Mediterranean world to contextualize how Greek and Roman mythology spread through conquest and trade.  Examining modern translations and adaptations will help us connect the world of antiquity to the present day.  Our class will be conducted over Zoom, and prioritize in-person discussion, collaborative learning, and interactive activities, with attention to improving writing skills. 

  • ENG 216-10, Greek and Roman Mythology, Rydel, MWF 8:30-9:20am
ENG 224. Introduction to Journalism.  This course will cover the foundations of reporting, writing, fact checking, and editing. Students will write a range of news and feature stories, including an obituary, an event, and a profile. We will also discuss journalistic ethics and the way the field has been transformed by the Internet.  Counts for Journalism, Editing, & Publishing minor, Humanities distribution, and W2 requirement.
  • ENG 224 -10, Intro to Journalism, O'Connor, MWF 10:30-11:20am

 

Fall 2021 Upper Level Courses in English, Creative Writing, and Journalism, Editing & Publishing

Fulfills English major pre-1800 requirement, upper-level English minor requirement, Gender Studies minor, and Medieval and Early Modern Studies minor.ENG 303: Women Writers to 1800.  Early women’s writing, much of it highly popular in its contemporary moment, has a history of being forgotten.  In this class, we will explore texts authored by women in the European tradition before 1800, venturing from the continent into the “New World.”   Our readings provide ample material for exploring the role of gender in authorial identity, a wide variety of literary genres, the changing circumstances of literary production, and the contributions of women writers to the Anglo-American literary tradition.  The theoretical readings will introduce you to the genealogy of scholars who have preserved, studied, and championed this tradition.

  • ENG 303-10:, Women Writers to 1800, Rydel, MWF 11:30am-12:20pm

Fulfills English major post-1800 requirement, upper-level English minor requirement, and the Gender Studies minor.ENG 332: Modern and Contemporary British Literature.  This course will cover a range of British writing from World War II and the retreat to realism in the 1950s through the postmodern turn and the current literary landscape.  Writers will include W.H. Auden, Samuel Beckett, Elizabeth Bowen, Angela Carter, Caryl Churchill, Graham Greene, Edna O'Brien, Graham Swith and Zadie Smith.

  • ENG 332-10:, Modern and Contemporary British Literature, O'Connor, MWF 12:30am-1:20pm

Fulfills English major post-1800 requirement, upper-level English minor requirement, and Environmental Studies major requirement.
ENG 347: American Environmental Writing.  The study of writing from an environmental perspective is both an emerging field in literary criticism and a rich tradition in American literary history.  What does it mean to be green from a literary point of view?  This course explores that question in looking at classic and contemporary authors of American environmental writing, from Henry David Thoreau to Annie Dillard to recent examples of eco-criticism.  Though the primary focus will be on nonfiction prose, that traditional home of nature writing, the course will also explore environmental perspectives in poetry, fiction, and film as well as cross-disciplinary connections with the natural sciences and social sciences.

  • ENG 347-10:, American Environmental Writing, Meehan, TuTh 11:30am-12:45pm

Fulfills English major post-1800 requirement, upper-level English minor requirement, and American Studies major.  

  • AMS/ENG 361: Literary Romanticism in the US I: Poe, Thoreau, Emerson,Stowe, DeProspo, W 3:30-6:00pm

Fulfills English major elective requirement, upper-level English minor requirement, and JEP minor upper-level workshop requirement.  This course introduces students to reporting techniques and journalistic styles of storytelling that go beyond daily deadline news. We will explore narrative journalism, also called longform or literary journalism, as both critical readers and practitioners. Our goal is to learn the various forms a story can take, what is required to tell one thoroughly and accurately, and how best to shape that story. Through writers such as Adrian Nicole LeBlanc, Jon Krakauer, Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah, and Matthew Desmond, students will study the craft and ethics of narrative journalism. Students will research, report, and write their own narrative journalism articles.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Journalism

  • ENG 394: Narrative Journalism, Abdur-Rahman, TuTh 2:30-3:45pm.

Fulfills English major elective requirement, upper-level English minor requirement, and Creative Writing minor upper-level workshop requirement. 

Prerequisite: Introduction to Creative Writing.

(Course is primarily intended for juniors and seniors.)

  • ENG 453: Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry, Hall, Th 6:30-8:30pm.

Required for all English majors in Fall of Junior year.

  • ENG 494-10: Junior Seminar, Knight, TuTh 1:00-2:15pm.

Fulfills English major post-1800 requirement, upper-level English minor requirement,  American Studies major, and Communication and Media Studies major.  This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of book history, with an emphasis on American print culture from the nineteenth century to the present.  You will explore topics related to the creation, publication, dissemination and reception of American print communication (e.g., books, periodicals, and newspapers).  You will also develop your critical reading and analytical writing skills, and you will learn research methods used by print culture scholars and literary historians. 

  • ENG 494-12: Book History and American Print Culture, Knight, TuTh 10:00-11:15am.

Fulfills Creative Writing Minor Upper-Level Requirement ("Editing and Publishing" option)

Fulfills Journalism, Editing & Publishing Minor Internship Requirement

Fulfills English Major Elective Requirement

ENG 390/490. Internships.  Internships in the English Department serve to give focus to a student’s prospective employment in the world beyond Washington College, and they aim to integrate and developthe writing, thinking, and communicative skills acquired in the course of completing an English Major, Creative Writing minor, or Journalism, Editing & Publishing minor . The specific conditions related to each internship will be developed among the faculty advisor, the representative of the institution offering the internship, and the student.

For more information on Internships, contact Dr. Elizabeth O'Connor, English Department Internship Coordinator

 

Want to see more about exciting classes we regularly teach?

Take a look at the Washington College course catalog for full course descriptions.

Course Catalog