Arts and Performance

Gibson Center for the Arts

Welcome

The Daniel Z. Gibson Center for the Arts places the arts at the heart of the liberal arts experience and as a cultural center for Maryland’s Eastern Shore. 

There are two performance spaces of human scale and functional design—a 200-seat music recital hall and an experimental theatre seating 150—each accessed through a common glassed lobby that overlooks Martha Washington Square.

In addition to the entrance at Martha Washington Square, visitors can enter the Center through a covered rear entrance adjacent to a guest parking lot. The Tipson Terrace, forming the front facade, is the perfect backdrop for impromptu outdoor performances.

 

In the News

Upcoming Events

February 22nd, 2019

March 1st, 2019

  • Godspell 7:30pm: “Godspell,” a musical by Stephen Schwartz & John-Michael Tebelak
    Godspell

    Directed by Ernie Green,Godspell is a musical composed by Stephen Schwartz with spoken parts by John-Michael Tebelak. Premiered in 1971, it has enjoyed immense popularity including several Broadway revivals. One if the most well-known songs, “Day-by-Day,” reached #13 on the Billboard pop charts in 1972.

March 2nd, 2019

  • Godspell 7:30pm: “Godspell,” a musical by Stephen Schwartz & John-Michael Tebelak.
    Directed by Ernie Green, Godspell is a musical composed by Stephen Schwartz with spoken parts by John-Michael Tebelak. Premiered in 1971, it has enjoyed immense popularity including several Broadway revivals. One if the most well-known songs, “Day-by-Day,” reached #13 on the Billboard pop charts in 1972.

March 5th, 2019

March 22nd, 2019

  • 7:30pm: Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde By Moisés Kaufman
    A Directing SCE by Jacqueline Glenn ’19

    In April 1895, Oscar Wilde brought a libel suit against the Marquess of Queensberry, the father of his youthful lover, who had publicly maligned him as a sodomite. In doing so, England’s reigning man of letters set in motion a series of events that would culminate in his ruin and imprisonment. For within a year the bewildered Wilde himself was on trial for acts of “gross indecency” and, implicitly—for a vision of art that outraged Victorian propriety. Expertly interweaving courtroom testimony with excerpts from Wilde’s writings and the words of his contemporaries, Gross Indecency unveils its subject in all his genius and human frailty, his age in all its complacency and repression.