Offices & Services

International Student Services

International Student Mentor Program

The Washington College International Student Community Mentor Program has been very successful in connecting international students to the local Chestertown community for over 15 years. Originated by Professor Noriko Narita, Lecturer in Japanese, this program continues today because of committed and caring individuals such as you!

Mentors - Click here to fill out the Mentor Application

Students - Click here to fill out Student Application

Mentor Waiver and Liability Form

 

In what ways does the mentor relationship improve the international students’ lives at Washington College?

The mentor/mentee friendship is built over time and through ongoing visits during the student’s studies at Washington College.  Although the international students are very likely to be familiar with different aspects of U.S. culture, their perceptions of U.S.-American life have been greatly formed by television, movies and the internet.  The reality, especially in a small town in a rural county, may not be what they expected.  There are many reasons why international students might want to participate in the program, but many say that they would like to be part of the mentor program as they want to:

  • Experience “real life” in the United States
  • Meet U.S.-Americans in the community
  • Improve their spoken English
  • Experience life outside of the college campus
  • Learn about career experiences and opportunities (please note that international students cannot legally work off-campus due to their visa status outside of academic training, curricular practical training, and occupational practical training)

After an initial meeting, the mentee and mentor will decide how often they would like to meet (weekly or biweekly meetings is the norm; although the meeting times vary based on the availability of both the mentor and mentees). 

How does the mentor relationship impact the mentor and his/her family?

Through these mentoring relationships, the international students are able to experience “real” life on Maryland’s historic Eastern Shore.  Mentors and their families, in turn, are able to meet and form friendships with students from diverse cultural backgrounds and life experiences.  The friendships formed between mentors and students often extend beyond the students’ stay in Chestertown, and have connected families across the globe.  Mentors report gaining a number of tangible and intangible rewards from hosting students. 

Some of these rewards include:

  • Learn more about a particular region/country
  • Practice language skills or learn a new language
  • Enrich their own lives by giving to others
  • Expand their appreciation of other cultures
  • Introduce their children to international students so they can broaden their understanding of the world and other cultures.

What can mentors do and where can they go with mentees?

Mentors and students are asked to meet locally within a 100 mile radius of Washington College. Overnight stays and travel outside the 100 mile local area are not sanctioned by the program.  Ideas for local outings include things such as Chestertown’s First Friday, partaking in a holiday tradition (i.e. carving pumpkins around Halloween), attending a local event such as Downrigging Weekend, taking in a show at Gibson or the Garfield, attending a high school sporting event, or meeting for tea, coffee or a meal. 

What if the mentee is not responsive to outreach or requesting things that the mentor is not comfortable assisting with?

This experience should be rewarding to both the mentor and mentee.  If the mentee is not responsive to the mentor’s request to get together, the mentor should contact the primary contact at the GEO to talk with the student to assess their interest and the reason why they are unresponsive.  If a mentee is asking things of the mentor outside the scope of the program such as a ride to the airport/mall or storage of their things over summer break the mentor can share with their mentee that they are unable to assist with these issues and encourage them to talk to the Global Education Office for assistance.  A student asking to stay at the home of a mentor over breaks is also outside the scope of the program and not sanctioned by the College or the mentor program.  

Who pays for events that have an entrance fee or for a meal?

Mentors are all volunteers and the best occasions are usually free – for example, a visit to the mentor’s home to share a dinner with the family, or to join in a family celebration or to participate in a holiday tradition.  If the student and the mentor do go out to dinner or visit a local attraction with an entrance fee, it is best for each person to pay their own way.  The important thing is to discuss who will pay ahead of time so that the mentee is aware of his/her financial commitment in partaking in the activity.

Are there any major changes now that the program is housed under GEO instead of WC-ALL as it was in the past?

In response to the growth in the international student population at Washington College, GEO has developed some prerequisites for participating in the program.  These requirements are aimed at fostering strong relationships between mentors and students, while adhering to best practices for mentoring and student safety.  The two main changes are that (1) Mentor volunteers need to undergo a routine background check and sign a liability waiver and (2) mentors and mentees are asked to keep their outings and activities local (within 100 miles of campus). 

Contact information for the program:

  • Email: geo@washcoll.edu
  • Sarah Lyle, Administrative Assistant, GEO and primary contact for mentors: 410-810-5038
  • Sibel Ahi, Assistant Director, GEO and primary contact for intl. students: 410-778-7762