Sustainability

Zingiber officinale (Ginger)

This tropical plant, likely found in your local grocery store, is one of the oldest and most widely used flavoring agents and medicinal herbs. Try breaking off a rhizome and planting it in a pot at home!

Common Name: Ginger

Scientific Name:  Zingiber officinale

Plant Family: Zingiberaceae (Ginger Family)

Primary Uses

Edible Parts: Rhizomes, or underground stems, commonly used as a flavoring agent. Can be eaten fresh, pickled, cooked into syrups, or dried and ground into a powder; Ginger beer is made from the rhizome; Young leaves and shoots can be eaten raw or pureed into sauces/dips; Young flowers are also edible; Essential oil can be made from the root

Medicinal Uses: A universal medicine in Ayurvedic and Chinese culture; considered a warming herb that stimulates perspiration and circulation, treats all forms of nausea, improves digestion and liver health, remedies abdominal chills, colds, influenza; Used externally to treat spasmodic pain, rheumatism, lumbago, menstrual cramps and sprains

Meaning of Scientific Name: ’Zingiber’ dervied from Sanskrit word, “shringaver,” which means “shaped like a horn”; ‘officinale’ means sold in shops, as medicinal herbs often were sold in an apothecary

 

Designing with this Plant

USDA Hardiness Zones: 8-12

Forest garden layer: Herbaceous perennial 

 

Sources:

https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Zingiber+officinale

http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?kempercode=a763

https://florafaunaweb.nparks.gov.sg/Special-Pages/plant-detail.aspx?id=2573