News

Sweet Relief for Refugees

  • Club president Felicia Attor ’20 gets some help packing boxes of macarons.
    Club president Felicia Attor ’20 gets some help packing boxes of macarons.
  • Chloé Carré, an exchange student from France, and Aniya Jefferson, a first-year student from Kent County, cook up some c...
    Chloé Carré, an exchange student from France, and Aniya Jefferson, a first-year student from Kent County, cook up some crêpes.
  • Members of the French Culture Club.
    Members of the French Culture Club.
April 29, 2019

The French Culture Club organized a crêpes and macaron sale, raising hundreds of dollars for displaced refugees.

Throughout the day of March 26, members of the newly-formed French Culture Club baked, decorated, and packaged boxes of crêpes and macarons, in the process raising more than $700 for the International Rescue Committee (IRC). According to the club’s co-president, Felicia Attor ’20, the event was years in the making.

“We’ve been talking about the idea of a crêpes and macaron sale since my freshman year,” says Attor, a double major in French and chemistry. “Finally this semester, we were able to see it realized.”

This fundraiser comes on the heels of the club’s rebranding, as the former French Club has been dormant. 

“There was a need to re-brand the club to attract a wider range of people,” says Attor. “When people hear French Club, they assume you need to speak French to be in this club. Changing the name to French Culture Club was a way to ensure a realization that we do not only speak French but are also interested in francophone cultures around the world. As we introduced this global component to the club, we realized that displacement is a global issue. And for many displaced people around the world, they have lost so much that we decided to be an ally and advocate for these individuals who have had their lives shattered.”

In addition to raising funds, the club asked students and faculty to sign cards with words of love and support for newly resettled families and individuals. According to Attor, “the messages were touching, and for this we are extremely grateful to the campus community.”

Throughout the fundraiser, members of the French Culture Club showed their dedication to the cause. Co-president Maria Betancur ’20 said that people arrived in Hodson Hall Commons before noon to set up and stayed until 8 p.m. to clean up.

“It was really amazing to see everyone come out,” Betancur says. “It was a hectic day, but it was a team effort.”

Professor of French Pamela Pears noted that “these students took this project on and did all the legwork. I am very proud of their ambitious project and thrilled to see the French Culture Club supporting the IRC.”

Attor rallied members of the French Culture Club to continue to advocate for displaced families.

“Raising this money does not and should not signify the end of our cause,” she wrote. “We all need to in our very small ways remember to be advocates for all the millions of people who have been displaced and are being displaced even as you read this email. No matter what, let us remember to put our humanity first. I hope that our love and humanity spreads and affects those around us to do the same. And as a club, we will keep working together to raise refugee awareness in any way we all can.” 

 

— Andrew Darlington ’19


Last modified on Apr. 29th at 1:22pm by Marcia Landskroener.