Pegasus

An Evening with Phil Sicker

  • Professor O'Connor introduces Phil Sicker
    Professor O'Connor introduces Phil Sicker
    Julie Armstrong
  • Phil Sicker begins his talk
    Phil Sicker begins his talk
    Julie Armstrong
  • Sicker talks about surveillance in Joyce's Portrait of the Artist and Ulysses
    Sicker talks about surveillance in Joyce's Portrait of the Artist and Ulysses
    Julie Armstrong
  • Sicker answers a few questions from the crowd
    Sicker answers a few questions from the crowd
    Julie Armstrong
  • Students and faculty listen intently to Sicker's talk
    Students and faculty listen intently to Sicker's talk
    Julie Armstrong
  • Professor O'Connor takes a photo with her former professor Phil Sicker
    Professor O'Connor takes a photo with her former professor Phil Sicker
    Julie Armstrong
  • Sicker talks with professors of the WC English department
    Sicker talks with professors of the WC English department
    Julie Armstrong

Location: Rose O’Neill Literary House

April 25, 2018
The Literary House hosted a talk with Fordham Professor Phil Sicker about Surveillance in James Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist and Ulysses

On Wednesday, April 25th, the Literary House hosted a Sophie Kerr Lecture Series talk by Phil Sicker, a professor of English at Fordham University. Sicker has written a number of articles on James Joyce’s novel, Ulysses, and is the author of Love and the Quest for Identity in the Fiction of Henry James. He also has a book soon to be published in 2018 titled Ulysses, Visual Technologies, and Culture. Sicker’s talk focused on both institutional and divine religious surveillance throughout James Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist and Ulysses.

Professor Elizabeth O’Connor, a previous student of Sicker’s, introduced Phil Sicker. She briefly talked about how committed Sicker is to scholarship and studying James Joyce. Sicker began his talk by explaining the concept of surveillance and how it affects the character of “Stephen” in Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist  and Ulysses. Sicker also talked in depth about the  concept of “being through divine vision” and how one can shape their identity and develop through having a divine surveillance over them. The talk ended with a quick Q&A session.


Last modified on May. 1st at 10:31am by Nick Blake.