Pegasus

The Geometrical Sublime

  • Students rounding the corner to view some of the wall art
    Students rounding the corner to view some of the wall art
    Kathryn Bedard
  • People chat amongst each other in front of the art
    People chat amongst each other in front of the art
    Kathryn Bedard
  • Above is a short summary of the exhibit that was on display for gallery goers.
    Above is a short summary of the exhibit that was on display for gallery goers.
    Kathryn Bedard
  • A photo of one of the wall art exhibits
    A photo of one of the wall art exhibits
    Kathryn Bedard
  • A collection of information about the exhibit
    A collection of information about the exhibit
    Kathryn Bedard
  • Everyone viewing the art before the talk
    Everyone viewing the art before the talk
    Kathryn Bedard
  • Dr. Tilghman continuing his talk in another part of the exhibit
    Dr. Tilghman continuing his talk in another part of the exhibit
    Kathryn Bedard
  • Dr. Tilghman discussing the historical aspects of the art
    Dr. Tilghman discussing the historical aspects of the art
    Kathryn Bedard
  • People looking over the books regarding the creation and inspiration behind the exhibit
    People looking over the books regarding the creation and inspiration behind the exhibit
    Kathryn Bedard
  • Dr. Tilghman during his talk
    Dr. Tilghman during his talk
    Kathryn Bedard
  • The audience moving about
    The audience moving about
    Kathryn Bedard
  • Audience members viewing some of the 2d exhibits
    Audience members viewing some of the 2d exhibits
    Kathryn Bedard
February 01, 2018
Dr. Tilghman’s lecture on February 1st explored and explained the artwork in the most recent Kohl gallery exhibit, ‘Geometric Aljamia: A Cultural Transliteration’ which is a group exhibition by Middle Eastern and American artists.

The artwork itself is a mixture of influences from Europe, the Mediterranean Basin, and the Middle East. The patterns of the artwork follow geometric orienamention and inspirations from the Islamic world.

Audience members had the opportunity to view the artwork prior to the talk. Upon starting his discussion, Dr. Tilghman wanted to make it clear that he’s not trying to speak on behalf of the artists, but rather the historical aspects that go into the various pieces’ creations and the different aspects of the art itself.

About The Speaker: Dr. Tilghman currently teaches Islamic art and Medieval Renaissance at Washington College as an Assistant Professor, Art and Art History.


Last modified on Feb. 19th at 5:08pm by Katie Bedard.