Human Resources

Flu Precautions!

  • Flu
    Flu
February 02, 2018

It is more important than ever that we continue to take steps to prevent the spread of flu because we have some confirmed cases on campus.  There is heightened concern about the flu this year because there are newer unanticipated strains becoming more prevalent that were not accounted for in the vaccine.  This means you should take protective measures even if you got a flu shot.

 

What can you do?

  1. Pay attention to the people around you and be mindful of your exposure to others who have the flu.  This is such an important step in flu prevention that the hospital has restricted visitors to end-of-life patients only.

  2. Don’t share drinks, phones, computers or utensils with co-workers or family members, and wipe surfaces clean frequently.

  3. If you are ill, stay home.  We all do important work and have people counting on us, but we are not doing them any favors if we expose them to illness also. 
    a.      Go to the doctor if illness persists or flu symptoms (see below) develop.

    b.      Employees with the flu should plan on staying home until they are fever-free without the assistance of medication for 48 hours.  This may mean a week-long absence.  Supervisors and Department chairs should plan for this contingency.  Alternative work arrangements should be considered when possible.

  4. If you know you’ve been exposed to someone who has the flu, you may want to consider a preventive course of Tamiflu.  The preventive course is 1 pill for 10 days, which is half of the treatment dose spread over a longer period.

  5. Practice good hygiene and etiquette.  Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly (hint: sing “Happy Birthday” to yourself twice while washing to insure you wash for about 20 seconds). You may also want to refrain from shaking hands if you feel like you’re coming down with something.
    a.     Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue or cough and sneeze into your upper sleeve(s). Dispose of tissues.

    b.     Clean your hands after coughing, sneezing, or blowing your nose.

    c.     Avoid touching your nose, mouth, and eyes

  6. Encourage appointments to avoid having sick people in waiting areas.

  7. If you are sick and you must be around people, consider wearing a mask.  People with compromised immunity or with higher risks of respiratory illness may also want to consider this step to insure they don’t contract the flu.

  8. Look out for each other and be encouraging about the steps people are taking to preserve their wellness and yours.

 

How do you know if it’s the flu?

 

Symptom

Cold

Flu

Norovirus (“Stomach Flu”)

Fever

Rare

Usual, typically high (102+), sudden, lasts 3-4 days

Occasional

Headache

Rare

Usual, sudden

Commonly reported

Aches & Pains

Mild

Usual, often severe

Occasional

Fatigue

Mild

Usual, lasts 2-3 weeks

Common, shorter duration

Runny Nose

Common

Common

None

Sneezing

Common

Sometimes

None

Sore Throat

Common

Common

Rare

Chest Discomfort

Mild

Usual, can be severe. Cough can last for weeks.

None

Nausea, Vomiting or Diarrhea

None

Rare

Common, frequent

Nausea & Vomiting

None

Rare

Common, frequent

Complications

Can lead to sinus or ear infections or possible bronchitis

Can lead to pneumonia & respiratory failure; can be life-threatening

Can lead to severe dehydration


Last modified on Feb. 2nd at 2:09pm by Krista Batchelor.