Pegasus

Voltage is Signal: Analog Video Works

  • Student admires some of the video projected onto the TV.
    Student admires some of the video projected onto the TV.
    Kathryn Bedard
  • Students standing in front of the exhibit ‘Twelve Electron Drawings.’
    Students standing in front of the exhibit ‘Twelve Electron Drawings.’
    Kathryn Bedard
  • ‘At or Near the Melting Point.’ This exhibit included remote controls dipped in chocolate.
    ‘At or Near the Melting Point.’ This exhibit included remote controls dipped in chocolate.
    Kathryn Bedard
  • Lots of students, residents, and staff came out to the event and admired the electronic art.
    Lots of students, residents, and staff came out to the event and admired the electronic art.
    Kathryn Bedard
  • Guests mingle and observe the art.
    Guests mingle and observe the art.
    Kathryn Bedard
  • This exhibit was interactive. A microphone and two drum sensors were set up so that movement and sound would cause the red...
    This exhibit was interactive. A microphone and two drum sensors were set up so that movement and sound would cause the red circle to change.
    Kathryn Bedard
  • Above is a short introduction to the artist and the artwork that’s being displayed at the gallery.
    Above is a short introduction to the artist and the artwork that’s being displayed at the gallery.
    Kathryn Bedard
  • ‘Momento Mori for H.B.’ Two Cameras were set up with a deer skull in the middle. In the video, attendees see thems...
    ‘Momento Mori for H.B.’ Two Cameras were set up with a deer skull in the middle. In the video, attendees see themselves becoming more faded as they approach the TV.
    Kathryn Bedard
November 09, 2017
Timothy Nohe is an artist and educator who uses electronic and traditional media as part of his artwork.

Nohe holds a master’s degree of fine arts in visual arts from the University of California, San Diego and a bachelors in Photography from the Maryland Institute College of Art. Currently, Nohe is a professor of visual arts at UMBC and the founding director of the Center for Innovation, Creativity, and Research in the Arts (CIRCA).

Some of the awards he has received include the Fulbright Senior Scholar Award from the Australian-American Fulbright Commission as well as American Fulbright Commission Fulbright alumni initiative grant in 2011.

The art being displayed at the Kohl gallery is a bit different than his previous, image-based art. What’s being introduced is a series of pieces that are meant to convey how voltages produce abstract art, which includes analog videos that are explored in various, innovative ways. A lot of the pieces call for audience interaction.

”One piece dealt with sounds and its very interactive which is nice since not much art is interactive”-Heber Guerra, Class of 2020

”It’s very cool and it’s got a nice, different use of colors. I’m an artist myself, so it’s nice to see people use different mediums”-Casey Wolhar, Class of 2020

“I do enjoy the two cameras set up near the deer head since I can’t decide which one of them is moving”-Jackson Filiacchia, Class of 2020 

“It’s awesome, I’m kind of wondering what the artist did for the pictures. I also really like the food” -Xidan Zhang, Class of 2018


Last modified on Feb. 7th at 4:05pm by Katie Bedard.