Theatre & Dance

Current Courses

FALL 2018 COURSES
THEATRE

 

THE  101 Drama, Stage, and Society I  
MWF 11:30am-12:20 pm
Volansky

This theatre history course will examine the development of (primarily) Western drama against a
backdrop of historical and social change. Students will read a variety of plays and  discuss 
theatre history, dramatic theory, and criticism representing the major currents in  (primarily) 
Western theatre from its origins to the 18th century CE. We will frequently employ  one or more of the following “lenses” or viewpoints to focus our lectures and discussions: the  physical 
theatre(how the material artifacts of theaterbuildings, documents, etc.tell the  story of theatre
history and influence dramaturgy); the social theatre(how the theatre relates  to its social 
context, including consideration of the audience); and the performing theatre (the plays 
themselves and how they were/are performed). Students will be encouraged to draw connections
between the material we cover in this course and the many intellectual and aesthetic parallels to be found in contemporaneous trends in history, philosophy, literature and the arts.
Theatre Majors and Minors may not  take this class pass/fail or as an audit.

 

THE 211-10 Intro to Acting
MWF 10:30-11:20am
Sommerfeld
Analysis and application of basic acting techniques with a concentration on scene study and character analysis.

THE 211-11 Intro to Acting
MWF 11:30am-12:20pm
Sommerfeld
Analysis and application of basic acting techniques with a concentration on scene study and character analysis.

THE 211-12 Intro to Acting
MWF 12:30-1:20pm
Daigle
Analysis and application of basic acting techniques with a concentration on scene study and character analysis.

THE 211-13 Intro to Acting
MWF 1:30-2:20pm
Daigle
Analysis and application of basic acting techniques with a concentration on scene study and character analysis.

 

THE 221 Directing I

TH 2:30-5:00 pm
Daigle
Study of the basic principles and practices of directing, including interpretation, structural analysis, and investigation.   

THE 231 Theatre Technology I
TTH 10:00-11:15am
Stahl

Investigation of methods and materials used in the theatrical production process. Laboratory hours will be required.  This course is designed primarily for those who plan to participate in future theatrical productions.

THE 241 Introduction to Theatrical Design
TTH 11:30am-12:45pm
Eckelman

This course offers a broad look at all aspects of theatrical design, including scenery, properties, costume, lighting, and sound, with an emphasis on inter-disciplinary skills such as close reading (of texts and images), research and clear communication (written, visual and aural). Students will learn to approach theatrical questions from a variety of angles, and will develop a basic understanding of all design elements and how they fit together. This course has a required lab section (for hands-on tutorials), but it will only be used a few times over the semester.

THE 294-12  SpTp: Arts Administration (BUS 394-10; MUS 394-12 - Cross Listing)

MWF 1:30-2:20
Eckelman
This course will offer an introduction to various aspects of administration and management for the visual and performing arts. Topics will vary, but may include: institutional leadership & governance, program planning & budgeting, intellectual property & contracting, labor & company management, marketing & public relations, and/or fundraising.

THE  311  Advanced Acting:  Shakespeare
TTH 1:00–2:15pm
Fox
Development of acting technique using Shakespearean texts with a concentration on physicalization of the role, including movement and voice production. Must have taken THE211.
No previous experience with Shakespeare required.

THE 394-10 Chick Playwrights
MWF  12:30-1:20 pm
Volansky
A 2012 survey of regional theaters across the United States asserted that one out of every three roles go to women. In England, there is a “stubborn” 2:1 male-to-female ratio that runs from boards of directors through to actors. However, in both countries, women buy 70% of the theater tickets sold and on Broadway, shows written by women (who statistically write more female roles than men) actually pull in more at the box office than plays by men. So why don’t we know more plays written by women? Students in this course will read the plays of contemporary female playwrights from the United States, the United Kingdom and around the globe. In addition, we will explore the data behind the numbers as well as investigate the role women currently play in making theater.

THE 394-11  Restoration Comedy (ENG 394-11 cross listing)
TTH 10:00-11:15 am
Fox

Scandal. Sex. Money. Virtue versus Vice. These themes are not the news in 2018, they are the backbone of Restoration Comedy. This course explores one of the most exciting and innovative periods of English theatre. When the monarchy was restored in 1660 - following more than a decade of Puritan rule - the theaters were reopened. But after 18 long years during which public performance had been criminalized and the playhouses shut, new performance spaces, new kinds of drama, and new repertories had to be created. Crucially, women were, for the very first time, permitted to appear on the public stage: this is the age of the first actresses. We’ll consider both how far the conventions of this genre changed over the course of the period and the extent to which comedy offered writers a vehicle for reinforcing or contesting contemporary conceptions of romance, sexuality, wealth and power. We will apply literary and dramatic analysis as well as on-our-feet exploration, to a variety of works including Wycherley, Etherege, Behn, and Congreve. Finally, we will examine how modern playwrights have deconstructed and paid tribute to their literary forebears.

PRACTICUMS

*Students are enrolled by the professor in the second week of classes

THE 181 Theatre Practicum: Crew

Eckelman

This course provides an opportunity for student technicians (lighting/sound/projection operators and backstage crew) of departmental productions (both SCE and faculty-directed) to receive credit for their work. To be enrolled in this course, technicians must participate in technical rehearsals and performances. (Specific duties are determined based on the needs of the production; guidelines are available from the instructor.) Technicians will receive 1 credit (pass/fail) and should expect to devote a total of 20-50 hours over the course of the production. This course is open to majors and non-majors. It may be taken for credit only once, although students are encouraged to participate in as many departmental productions as they wish. (Non-credit-bearing participants will be noted as auditors.) To enroll for credit, contact the instructor.

THE 182 Theatre Practicum: Performance

Eckelman

This course provides an opportunity for student performers in departmental productions (both SCE and faculty-directed) to receive credit for their work. To be enrolled in this course, performers must participate in auditions, call backs, and rehearsals. (Specific duties are determined based on the needs of the production; guidelines are available from the instructor) Performers will receive 2 credits (pass/fail) and should expect to devote a total of 60-100 hours over the course of the production. This course is open to majors and non-majors. It may be taken for credit only once, although students are encouraged to participate in as many departmental productions as they wish. (Non-credit-bearing participants will be noted as auditors.) To enroll for credit, contact the instructor.

THE 183 Theatre Practicum: Design

Eckelman

This course provides an opportunity for student designers of departmental productions (both SCE and faculty-directed) to receive credit for their work. To be enrolled in this course, designers must participate in an orientation workshop (scenery, props, costumes, lighting,
or sound), production meetings, and a design meeting with the departmental faculty. (Specific duties are determined based on the needs of the production; guidelines are available from the instructor.) Designers will receive 2 credits (pass/fail) and should expect to devote a total of 60-100 hours over the course of the production. This course is open to majors and non-majors. It may be taken for credit only once, although students are encouraged to participate in as many departmental productions as they wish. (Non-credit-bearing participants will be noted as auditors.) To enroll for credit, contact the instructor.

THE 184 Theatre Practicum: Dramaturgy & Direction

Eckelman

This course provides an opportunity for student dramaturgs and assistant directors of departmental productions (both SCE and faculty-directed) to receive credit for their work. To be enrolled in this course, dramaturgs and assistant directors must participate in production meetings and rehearsals. (Specific duties are determined based on the needs of the production; guidelines are available from the instructor.) Dramaturgs and assistant directors will receive 2 credits (pass/fail) and should expect to devote a total of 60-100 hours over the course of the production. This course is open to majors and non-majors. It may be taken for credit only once, although students are encouraged to participate in as many departmental productions as they wish. (Non-credit-bearing participants will be noted as auditors.) To enroll for credit, contact the instructor.

THE 185 Theatre Practicum: Assistant Stage Management

Eckelman

This course provides an opportunity for student assistant stage managers of departmental productions (both SCE and faculty-directed) to receive credit for their work. To be enrolled in this course, assistant stage managers must participate in production meetings and rehearsals. (Specific duties are determined based on the needs of the production; guidelines are available from the instructor.) Assistant stage managers will receive 2 credits (pass/fail) and should expect to devote a total of 60-100 hours over the course of the production. This course is open to majors and non-majors. It may be taken for credit only once, although students are encouraged to participate in as many departmental productions as they wish. (Non-credit-bearing participants will be noted as auditors.) To enroll for credit, contact the instructor.

 

DANCE

 

DAN 212  Beginning Ballet
MW 4:00-5:15 pm
Cannon

Beginning Ballet is an introduction to the fundamentals of ballet technique as well as ballet terminology, traditions, and etiquette. Ballet class begins at the ballet barre and progresses to ballet centre adagio, and allegro combinations, all of which emphasize clarity of line, movement efficiency, range of motion, and artistry. Readings, videos, reflective and analytical writing, and live performance will contextualize the in-class work.

 

DAN 227  Modern Dance
TTH 4:00-5:15 pm
Moffett

An introduction to basic principles of modern dance as a creative art form: dance movement, body alignment, coordination, strength, and flexibility, movement vocabulary, dance sequences, and musicality. Improvisation exercises and short composition studies will be included. If taken for academic credit, concert attendance and two short papers are required. Focuses on a biomechanical approach to movement and basic principles and techniques derived from the American founders of modern dance—Graham, Cunningham, Limon, and Weidman. Some choreography, research, and writing required.

 

DAN 233  Dance Composition
TTH 2:30-3:45pm
Moffett

Dance Composition is an introduction to the craft of making dances. It is designed to allow students to experience the process of discovering, creating, and performing original movement.  Students utilize choreographic theories and compositional devices to develop solo and small group works. Students are encouraged to create in a range of vocabularies. The course emphasizes the development of self­ expression, creative inquiry, and critical awareness. Research, writing, and discussion required.

 

DAN 394-10 Special Topics:  Movement for Actors
MW 2:30-3:45pm
Moffett

This is an experiential course that focuses on cultivating body awareness and movement skills for actors. Students will explore movement frameworks taken from modern dance and dance improvisation in order to discover the possibilities of the body as it relates to embodying characters, transitioning between environments, and physically preparing for performance. Readings, videos, and reflective writing will contextualize the movement practice.

 

DAN 394-11  Special Topics:  Tap (A-1)
MW 2:30-3:45 pm
Cannon

This course is an introduction to Tap Dance technique and vocabulary. Special emphasis is placed on musicality, rhythmic development, and expression in performance within its cultural and historical context. Readings, videos, and reflective writing will contextualize the movement practice.

DAN 394-12  Special Topics: Dance Repertory (A-2)
MW 2:30-3:45 pm
Cannon

Dance Repertory is a studio course where students learn excerpts and/or complete choreographic works from established choreographers in the dance field. The repertoire includes significant choreographic works from multiple dance genres that are reconstructed by dance faculty. Dance Repertory offers students the opportunity to synthesize their technical skills with their knowledge of dance history.