Theatre & Dance

Current Courses

 FALL 2019
Theatre

THE 101-10 Drama, Stage and Society I
TTH 1:00pm-2:15 pm
Volansky
This theatre history course will examine the development of (primarily) Western drama against a backdrop of historical and social change. Students will read a variety of plays and discuss theatre history, dramatic theory, and criticism representing the major currents in (primarily) Western theatre from its origins to the 18th century CE. We will frequently employ one or more of the following “lenses” or viewpoints to focus our lectures and discussions: the physical theatre (how the material artifacts of theater-buildings, documents, etc.-tell the story of theatre history and influence dramaturgy); the social theatre (how the theatre relates to its social context, including consideration of the audience); and the performing theatre (the plays themselves and how they were/are performed). Students will be encouraged to draw connections between the material we cover in this course and the many intellectual and aesthetic parallels to be found in contemporaneous trends in history, philosophy, literature, and the arts. Theatre Majors and Minors may not take this class pass/fail or as an audit.

THE 101-11 Drama, Stage and Society I
TTH 1:00pm-2:15 pm
Fox
This theatre history course will examine the development of (primarily) Western drama against a backdrop of historical and social change. Students will read a variety of plays and discuss theatre history, dramatic theory, and criticism representing the major currents in (primarily) Western theatre from its origins to the 18th century CE. We will frequently employ one or more of the following “lenses” or viewpoints to focus our lectures and discussions: the physical theatre (how the material artifacts of theater-buildings, documents, etc.-tell the story of theatre history and influence dramaturgy); the social theatre (how the theatre relates to its social context, including consideration of the audience); and the performing theatre (the plays themselves and how they were/are performed). Students will be encouraged to draw connections between the material we cover in this course and the many intellectual and aesthetic parallels to be found in contemporaneous trends in history, philosophy, literature, and the arts. Theatre Majors and Minors may not take this class pass/fail or as an audit.

THE 211-10 Acting I
MWF 10:30-11:20am
Sommerfeld
Analysis and application of basic acting techniques with a concentration on scene study and character analysis.

THE 211-11 Acting I
MWF 1:30pm-2:20pm
Daigle
Analysis and application of basic acting techniques with a concentration on scene study and character analysis.

THE 231 Theatre Technology I
TTH 10:00-11:15am
D’Elia
Investigation of methods and materials used in the theatrical production process. Laboratory hours will be required.  This course is designed primarily for those who plan to participate in future theatrical productions.

THE 241 Introduction to Theatrical Design
TTH 11:30am-12:45pm, lab F 2:30-4:00 pm
Eckelman
This course offers a broad look at all aspects of theatrical design, including scenery, properties, costume, lighting, and sound, with an emphasis on inter-disciplinary skills such as close reading (of texts and images), research and clear communication (written, visual and aural). Students will learn to approach theatrical questions from a variety of angles, and will develop a basic understanding of all design elements and how they fit together. This course has a required lab section (for hands-on tutorials), but it will only be used a few times over the semester.

THE 394-10 Advanced Design: Lighting
MW 2:30-3:45 pm
Eckelman
Building on the skills and ideas of Intro Design, this course offers a deeper look at the art and craft of theatrical lighting—from play analysis and visual research to system design and cueing. Through class discussion, hands-on activities, and creative design projects, students will develop their abilities to conceive, communicate, and execute design ideas onstage. Prerequisite(s): THE241 or permission of the instructor

THE 394-11 Special Topics: Advanced Acting: Contemporary Acting Styles
TTH  10:00-11:15 am 
Fox
Building on the skills and ideas in Introduction to Acting, this course offers a deeper look at acting styles in the 20th and 21st century. Students will delve into the art and craft of a range of plays, including naturalistic, “kitchen sink dramas” (such as Arthur Miller and Clifford Odets), poetic lyricism (Tennessee Williams) and works that explore silence and overlapping dialogue (such as Annie Baker and Caryl Churchill). Though text analysis, period research, and on-their-feet monologues and scenes, students will hone their abilities to use language and movement to convey character and conflict in powerful and exciting ways onstage. This will be useful for public speaking, presentation skills, and general confidence presenting information to groups.  Prerequisite(s): THE211 or permission of the instructor 

THE  351 Introduction to Playwriting (ENG 351-10 Cross Listing)
T  2:30 – 5:00 pm
Volansky
Analysis and practical application of techniques and styles employed in writing for the stage.

THE  400  Elements of Production
Eckelman
This course provides hands­-on experiential learning for majors and minors through participation in ushering, work calls, and strikes for departmental productions. By enrolling in this course, students commit to completing all required activities during the indicated semester. Course requirements will be clearly outlined by the instructor at the beginning of the semester, but typically include: three ushering shifts, two work calls per faculty­-directed show, all faculty ­directed show strikes, one SCE work call, and two SCE strikes. This is a zero-­credit course and is graded pass/fail. Majors must enroll in and pass the course four times; minors must enroll and pass twice. Students are strongly encouraged to plan ahead, anticipating busy semesters and study abroad. Students must enroll themselves in this course, either during the open registration period or drop/add period.

 PRACTICUM COURSES

*Students will be enrolled in these courses by the professor, typically during the second week of classes. 

THE 181 Theatre Practicum: Crew
Eckelman
This course provides an opportunity for student technicians (lighting/sound/projection operators and backstage/wardrobe/run crew) of departmental theatre & dance productions to receive credit for their work. Technicians typically must participate in load-in, technical rehearsals, performances, and strike; specific duties are determined based on the needs of each production. Technicians should expect to devote a total of 20-50 hours, some of which may be during college breaks, adjacent semesters, weekends, holidays, and other unusual times. Student technicians will be automatically enrolled (either for credit or as auditors) after their production closes. Practicum courses may each be taken for credit only once, although students are encouraged to participate in as many departmental productions as they wish. 1 credit, pass/fail.

THE 182 Theatre Practicum: Performance
Eckelman
This course provides an opportunity for student performers in departmental theatre & dance productions to receive credit for their work. Performers typically must participate in auditions, callbacks, rehearsals, load-in, technical rehearsals, performances, and strike; specific duties are determined based on the needs of each production. Performers should expect to devote a total of 60-100 hours, some of which may be during college breaks, adjacent semesters, weekends, holidays, and other unusual times. At the beginning of each semester, all students involved in departmental productions will be automatically enrolled as auditors in the relevant practicum course(s), and will be given an opportunity to request credit by contacting the instructor. Practicum courses may each be taken for credit only once, although students are encouraged to participate in as many departmental productions as they wish. 2 credits, pass/fail.

THE 183 Theatre Practicum: Design
Eckelman
This course provides an opportunity for student designers of departmental theatre & dance productions to receive credit for their work. Designers typically must participate in a production orientation workshop (scenery, props, costumes, lighting, or sound), a design meeting with the departmental faculty, production meetings, load-in, technical rehearsals, and strike; specific duties are determined based on the needs of the production. Designers should expect to devote a total of 60-100 hours, some of which may be during college breaks, adjacent semesters, weekends, holidays, and other unusual times. At the beginning of each semester, all students involved in departmental productions will be automatically enrolled as auditors in the relevant practicum course(s), and will be given an opportunity to request credit by contacting the instructor. Practicum courses may each be taken for credit only once, although students are encouraged to participate in as many departmental productions as they wish. 2 credits, pass/fail. 

THE 184 Theatre Practicum: Dramaturgy & Direction
Eckelman
This course provides an opportunity for student dramaturgs, assistant directors, choreographers (movement/dance/fight), and devisers of departmental theatre & dance productions to receive credit for their work. Students in these positions typically must participate in production meetings, rehearsals, load-in, technical rehearsals, and strike; specific duties are determined based on the needs of the production. Students in these positions should expect to devote a total of 60-100 hours, some of which may be during college breaks, adjacent semesters, weekends, holidays, and other unusual times. At the beginning of each semester, all students involved in departmental productions will be automatically enrolled as auditors in the relevant practicum course(s), and will be given an opportunity to request credit by contacting the instructor. Practicum courses may each be taken for credit only once, although students are encouraged to participate in as many departmental productions as they wish. 2 credits, pass/fail.

THE 185 Theatre Practicum: Assistant Stage Management
Eckelman
This course provides an opportunity for student assistant stage managers of departmental theatre & dance productions to receive credit for their work. Assistant stage managers typically must participate in production meetings, rehearsals, load-in, technical rehearsals, performances, and strike; specific duties are determined based on the needs of the production. Assistant stage managers should expect to devote a total of 60-100 hours, some of which may be during college breaks, adjacent semesters, weekends, holidays, and other unusual times. At the beginning of each semester, all students involved in departmental productions will be automatically enrolled as auditors in the relevant practicum course(s), and will be given an opportunity to request credit by contacting the instructor. Practicum courses may each be taken for credit only once, although students are encouraged to participate in as many departmental productions as they wish. 2 credits, pass/fail.

THE 285 Advanced Theatre Practicum: Stage Management
Th 5:00-6:00pm
Eckelman
This course provides an opportunity for student stage managers of departmental theatre & dance productions to receive credit for their work. Stage managers typically must participate in weekly roundtable discussions with the faculty, auditions, callbacks, production meetings, rehearsals, load-in, technical rehearsals, performances, and strike; specific duties are determined based on the needs of the production. Stage managers should expect to devote a total of 120-200 hours, some of which may be during college breaks, adjacent semesters, weekends, holidays, and other unusual times. At the beginning of each semester, all students involved in departmental productions will be automatically enrolled as auditors in the relevant practicum course(s), and will be given an opportunity to request credit by contacting the instructor. Practicum courses may each be taken for credit only once, although students are encouraged to participate in as many departmental productions as they wish. 4 credits, pass/fail. Prerequisite: THE185, coursework in stage management, or permission of the instructor.

 

                                    DANCE

DAN 101 Dance in Culture and Society
MW 4:00-5:15pm
Moffett
Dance is an embodied form of expression that lives within the interconnected worlds of art, community, ritual, and culture.  DCS will provide a survey of dance in various forms, geographical locations, and will investigate the numerous ways dance functions in societies. Movement, video observation, group projects, and reflective and analytical writing will be our vehicles for engaging with dance practices, the people who dance, and the places where dance exists. Students are exposed to many facets of dance as an expression of cultural values.   

DAN 108 Special Topics: Beginning Tap Dance
MW 4:00-5:15 pm
Cannon
This technique course is an introduction to Tap Dance vocabulary and history, highlighting the contributions of African American innovators of the form, including pioneering artists Master Juba, Bill “Bojangles” Robinson, the Nicholas Brothers, Gregory Hines, and Savion Glover.  In Tap Dance, special emphasis is placed on musicality, rhythmic development, and expression in performance within its cultural and historical context. Readings, videos, and reflective writing will contextualize the experiential practice. 

DAN 212 Beginning Ballet
TTH 4:00-5:15 pm
Moffett
Beginning ballet will offer an introduction to the fundamentals of ballet technique as well as ballet terminology, traditions, and etiquette.  Special emphasis will be placed on working in optimal alignment, building both strength and flexibility, and finding one’s center.   Ballet class begins at the ballet barre and progresses to ballet centre adagio, and allegro combinations, all of which emphasize clarity of line, movement efficiency, range of motion, and artistry. Readings, videos, reflective and analytical writing, and live performance will contextualize the in-class work.  Students should anticipate active participation through movement, discussion, and reflection. 

DAN 227  Beginning Modern Dance
TTH 2:30-3:45 pm
Moffett
Beginning Modern Dance is an introduction to basic principles of modern dance as a creative art form. We will work on movement phrases that embody fluid qualities like suspension, controlled falling, sweeping, spiraling, and percussive qualities such as darting, jumping, and dropping. Special emphasis will be placed on body awareness, alignment, and artistic expression. The class structure includes a full body warm-up, center movement studies, traveling sequences and extended phrase work that integrates and develops the movement vocabulary. Readings, videos, reflective and analytical writing, and live performance will contextualize the movement practice.  Students should anticipate working in groups, improvising dance concepts: body, space, time, energy, and participating in class discussions.