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English

Current Courses

Fall 2017

Here are the English courses being offered in Fall 2017 and the different ways in which they can be used to fulfill the English major and the Creative Writing minor. For a full description of each course, including the Special Topics courses, click on the course numbers below. 

  • ENG 101 (10-24): Literature and Composition

    ENG 101 10: Lit & Comp            MWF 9:30-10:12            Andrews        

    ENG 101 11: Lit & Comp            MWF 10:30-11:20            Meehan          

    ENG 101 12: Lit & Comp            MWF 12:30-1:20            Soderberg

    ENG 101 13: Lit & Comp            MWF 1:30-2:20            Charles           

                     

    This course is intended to develop the student’s capacity for intelligent reading, critical analysis, and writing through the study of literature. There are frequent writing assignments, as well as individual conferences on the student’s writing.

     

    Counts for: English major 200-level requirement, Humanities distribution, W2 (writing requirement)

  • ENG 103 10: Intro to Creative Writing

    ENG 103 10: Intro to Creative Writing            MWF 11:30-12:20            Andrews        

    ENG 103 11: Intro to Creative Writing            MW 2:30-3:45            Hall                

    ENG 103 12: Intro to Creative Writing            TTH 10-11:15            Sovich

         

    A workshop on the forms of creative writing—primarily poetry and fiction—as practiced by the students themselves. Readings in contemporary literature and craft.

     

    Counts for: Creative Writing minor, W2 (writing requirement)

  • ENG 205 10/THE 205 10: Shakespeare I

    ENG 205 10/ THE 205 10: Shakespeare I            TTH 2:30-3:45            Moncrief     

                   

    This course will examine some of Shakespeare’s best known earlier plays (those written before the death of Queen Elizabeth in 1603) both in the context of early modern English culture and as play scripts/performances. Class discussions, with significant contributions from student papers, will explore Shakespeare’s writings as products/producers of early modern culture through the consideration of issues including identity, politics, monarchy, religious conflicts, crime and justice, play and festivity, enclosure and urbanization, world exploration and colonization, nation and national identity, theatricality and theatre-going, religion, family, sexuality, and gender. Using films and live productions (if available) we will also consider the plays as they have been interpreted for performance.

     

    Counts for: Pre-1800, Humanities distribution

    Also counts for: Theatre major, Communication major

  • ENG 207 10: History of English Lit I

    ENG 207 10: History of English Lit I         MWF 9:30-10:20                    Charles

     

    A survey of the development of English literature from Anglo-Saxon times to the present with attention to the historical background, the continuity of essential traditions, and the characteristic temper of successive periods. The second semester begins approximately with the Restoration in 1660.

     

    Counts for: 200-level, Humanities distribution

  • ENG 208 10: History of English Literature II

    ENG 208 10: History of English Literature II            TTH 10-11:15            Gillin              

     

    A survey of the development of English literature from Anglo-Saxon times to the present with attention to the historical background, the continuity of essential traditions, and the characteristic temper of successive periods. The second semester begins approximately with the Restoration in 1660.

     

    Counts for: 200-level, Humanities distribution

  • ENG 209 /AMS 209: Intro to American Lit I

    TTH 11:30-12:45            De Prospo      

    TTH 1:00-2:15            De Prospo      


    Taught in the fall semester, the course is concerned with the establishment of American Literature as a school subject. Texts that have achieved the status of classics of American Literature, such as Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, Thoreau’s Walden, and Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, will be read in the context of the history and politics of their achieving this status. Texts traditionally excluded from the canon of American literature, in particular early Hispano- and Franco-American texts, will be considered in the context of their relative marginality to the project of establishing American Literature as worthy of being taught and studied in the American academy. Other-than-written materials, such as modern cinematic representations of the period of exploration and colonization of North America, as well as British colonial portraits and history paintings, will be studied for how they reflect on claims for the cultural independence of early America. Other-than-American materials, such as late medieval and early Renaissance Flemish and Hispanic still lifes, as well as the works of nineteenth-century European romantic poets and prose writers, will be sampled for how they reflect on claims for the exceptional character of American culture.

     

    Counts for: 200-level, Humanities distribution

    Also counts for: American Studies major

  • ENG 215 10: Bible as Literature

    ENG 215 10: Bible as Literature            MWF 12:30-1:20            Rydel  

     

    We will read and analyze the Bible as literature, covering as much of the Hebrew and Christian scriptures as a semester allows. Our focus will be in gaining familiarity with the major stories, characters, images, and diverse genres of biblical literature, with some attention to the historical and cultural context in which these texts were composed. This course will provide you with the background to appreciate later literary and artistic works that assume biblical knowledge, as well as understanding the Bible itself as a unique and influential literary work.

     

    Counts for: 200-level, Humanities distribution

  • ENG 220 10: Intro to Fiction

    MFW 10:30-11:20            Soderberg

    TTH 2:30-3:45            Mooney

     

    This course will survey the rich tradition of prose fiction largely, but not exclusively, in English. Emphasis will be placed on the enduring features of this genre as it evolved throughout the centuries as well as to the innovations introduced by individual writers. The literary works selected for this course will draw upon a variety of fictional forms and styles. Class discussions will include, along with close readings of the works themselves, an appreciation of the historical and cultural contexts out of which they arose and to which they gave a fictional rewriting.

     

    Counts for: 200-level, Humanities distribution, W2 (writing requirement)

  • ENG 221 10: Intro to Nonfiction

    W2 ENG 221 10: Intro to Nonfiction            MWF 11:30-12:20            Meehan          

     

    We study the essay, the oldest and arguably most significant form of nonfiction. As you will see, this is not necessarily the “essay” you were asked (or forced) to write in earlier schooling. Essayists, from Montaigne and Emerson to contemporary writers of what’s called creative nonfiction have viewed this literary form not as punishment or even pedagogy so much as performance and experiment. “Essay is a verb, not just a noun,” the contemporary essayist John D’Gata notes, “essaying is a process.” We will explore that process as both readers and writers of essays across three parts of the course, moving us from classic to contemporary examples, and from critical perspectives on the essay to creative performance of our own essaying. Part One: The Philosophy of the Essay—origins and principles of the form. Part Two: The Rhetoric of the Essay—the essay in series or book collection, used to argue, expose, explore. Part Three: The Poetics of the Essay—innovations of the essay in recent forms of “creative nonfiction,” including multimedia. The course will culminate with a substantial essay that students develop and prepare for actual publication.

     

    Counts for: 200-level, Humanities distribution, W2 (Writing Requirement)

  • ENG 294 10: Special Topic: Intro to Journalism

    ENG 294 10: Special Topic: Intro to Journalism            MWF 1:30-2:20            O’Connor    

                                           

    This course will cover the foundations of reporting, writing, fact checking, and editing. Students will write a range of news and feature stories, including an obituary, an event, and a profile. We will also discuss journalistic ethics and the way the field has been transformed by the Internet.

     

    Counts for: 200-level, Humanities distribution, Communication Major, W2 (Writing Requirement)

  • ENG/GEN 302 10: Arthurian Lit

    ENG/GEN 302 10: Arthurian Lit            MWF 10:30-11:20            Rydel                          

     

    This class will examine the development of the Arthurian romance in the medieval literary tradition and its many genres, as well as gain as well as some insight into the longer trajectory of Arthuriana that continues in present day popular adaptations. The class is primarily structured around Sir Thomas Malory’s “Le Morte D’Arthur,” for this fifteenth-century text unifies the stories about King Arthur, Guinevere, the knights of the Round Table, and their associates into an overarching narrative that has dominated retellings ever since. Alongside the Morte D’Arthur, we will read Malory’s sources and analogues to see their contrasting perspectives on these characters. As we study how these authors and texts reinterpret each other, we will read literary criticism and engage in scholarly research to produce presentations and essays.

     

    Counts for: Pre-1800, Elective

    Also counts for: Gender Studies minor

  • ENG 312/THE 310/GEN 311: Renaissance Drama

    ENG 312/THE 310/GEN 311: Renaissance Drama            TTH 1-2:15            Moncrief        

     

    This course examines early modern English drama, exclusive of Shakespeare, from the 1580s through the 1630s in its unique cultural, historical, and theatrical context. It explores plays by prominent dramatists including Thomas Kyd, Christopher Marlowe, John Lyly, Thomas Dekker, Thomas Heywood, Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton, William Rowley, John Webster and John Ford. Key issues will include the following: playing conditions (theatres and theatre companies), the relationship of the stage to the monarchy, the importance of the city (London), the relationship of the stage to dominant religious beliefs and practices, the impact of Puritanism and anti-theatricality, the effect of censorship and licensing, the role of gender and cross-dressing in theatrical representation and the staging of desire. 

     

    Counts for: Pre-1800, Elective

    Also counts for: Theatre major, Gender Studies minor

  • ENG 321/GEN 305: Romanticism

    ENG 321/GEN 305: Romanticism            TTH 11:30-12:45            Gillin  

     

    The movement from the late eighteenth century to 1832 considered as a revolution in the aims and methods of poetry. Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats.

     

    Counts for: Post-1800, Elective

    Also counts for: Gender Studies minor

  • ENG/GEN 331: Late Modernism & Its Discontents

    ENG/GEN 331: Late Modernism & Its Discontents            MWF 12:30-1:20            O’Connor

     

    A study of the fiction, nonfiction, poetry and drama from the 1920s to the late 1930s paying close attention to the after effects of the experimentation of high modernism and how it, coupled with the rise of fascism and World War II, led to the fracturing of the movement and a return to more traditional prose and poetic structures. Writers will include Djuna Barnes, Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce, Marianne Moore, Flann O’Brien, Jean Rhys, Virginia Woolf, and William Butler Yeats.

     

    Counts for: Post-1800, Elective

    Also counts for: Gender Studies minor

  • ENG/THE 351: Introduction to Playwriting

    ENG/THE 351: Introduction to Playwriting             M 2:30-5            Spotswood

     

    Introduction to writing for the stage with concentration on developing dialogue and dramatic action.

     

    Counts for: Elective, Creative Writing minor

    Also counts for: Theatre major

  • ENG 361 10: Literary Romanticism in the US

    ENG 361 10: Literary Romanticism in the US             W 7-9:30            DeProspo

     

    Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Stowe.

     

    Counts for: Post-1800, Elective

    Also counts for: American Studies major

  • ENG 393/493 10: Journalism Practicum

    ENG 393/493 10: Journalism Practicum            Th 6-7 pm            McIntire                                                                            

     

    This practicum for The Elm teaches basic news reporting and writing – the who, what, when, where, why & how of story organization; getting quickly to the point; conciseness; straightforward exposition; accuracy, fairness and balance, and ethical issues.

     

    This is a two-credit course. Students may count no more than 4 journalism practicum credits toward the English major. (Students must take both ENG 393 and ENG 493 to earn credit for a course in the major.)

     

    Counts for: Elective

    Prerequisite: Students must take both ENG 393 and 493 to count for the ENG major

  • ENG 394 10/GEN 394: Irish Film and Culture

    ENG 394 10/GEN 394: Irish Film and Culture            M 2:30-5            Gillin

     

    By looking at the way Ireland and Irishness are portrayed in film in the United States, England, and Ireland we will explore the way certain images of Irish identity are manipulated, reinforced, or challenged. The tensions among commercial, historical, political, and national aims will be examined in connection to the aesthetic value of the films in the course. Print texts will also be used to amplify elements of Irish culture. The films included in the course are the following: The Quiet Man, The Field, My Left Foot, Michael Collins, Waking Ned Devine, The Snapper, Once, The Wind that Shakes the Barley, In the Name of the Father, The Snapper, The Commitments, The Crying Game, Bloody Sunday, The Magdalene Sisters, and In America.

     

    Counts for: Elective

    Also counts for: Gender Studies minor

  • ENG 394 11: Immigrant Fiction in the US

    ENG 394 11: Immigrant Fiction in the US            MWF 9:30-10:20            Soderberg

     

    Writings about immigration to the U.S. are a fundamentally contradictory and variable body of literature. Yet it is also one of the largest and most central to our national imagination. What might a first-generation Irish American immigrant in New York have to do with a third-generation Asian American immigrant in California? Can stories about trying to become American in the nineteenth-century tell us something about becoming an American today? This class will look at some of the larger patterns and resonances that arise from this body of narratives, tracking how ideas of home, exile, and citizenship have changed over the course of U.S. history. We’ll also look at some of the laws that governed who could become an American and how, as well as larger debates about assimilation and difference. We will focus particularly in the context of Asian American and Latino/a literature, but we’ll also ask how the experiences and writings of African Americans, European immigrants, and Native Americans have shaped ideas of joining the nation.

     

    Counts for: Post-1800, Elective

    Also counts for: American Studies major

  • ENG 394 12: Design for Editing and Publishing

    ENG 394 12: Design for Editing and Publishing            W 1:30-4            Sovich            

     

    This course will explore the relationship between the visual aesthetic and the editorial aesthetic of literary publications, and how design, typography, layout, and materials can reflect a publication’s content and editorial approach. Students will research and analyze literary journals and small press catalogs, and consider the differences in audience and purpose between print and online publications. Students will propose and design the first issue of a print or online publication, as well as design and write promotional materials for the publication, such as postcards, broadsides, social media content, and banner ads. Through hands-on experience, students will gain proficiency in Adobe InDesign and other standard software used in page layout and image creation.

     

    Counts for: Elective, Creative Writing minor

    Also counts for: Art major, Business major, Communication and Media Studies major

  • ENG 394 13: Jane Austen Inc.

    ENG 394 13: Jane Austen Inc.            MWF 11:30-12:20            Charles

     

    Upon the two-hundredth anniversary of the author’s death, the Jane Austen brand has never been stronger: her novels and the literary tourism, fan fiction, film adaptations, and associated merch they inspire, together generate some hundreds of millions of dollars annually. How did Austen help create the modern novel? And what factors contribute to her novels’ enduring popularity and adaptability? This course will combine an intensive study of Austen’s novels and select juvenilia with a critical approach to the popular adaptations that hook many of her new fans.

     

    Counts for: Post-1800, Elective

    Also counts for: Gender Studies minor

  • ENG 452: Creative Writing Workshop: Fiction

    ENG 452: Creative Writing Workshop: Fiction            W 4-6:30            Mooney

     

    This workshop offers guided practice in the writing of short fiction. Using the work of established writers as models, considerable effort is put toward the objective of learning to read as writers and, in the process, becoming better critics of the student’s own work and the work of others in the group. By offering a more intimate familiarity with the elements of fiction, students write and revise prodigiously and, in the process, learn and practice a repertoire of literary strategies in preparation and in support of short stories of their own composition. 

     

    Prerequisite: ENG 103: Introduction to Creative Writing

    Counts for: Elective, Creative Writing minor

  • ENG 453: Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry

    ENG 453: Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry             M 1:30-4            Andrews

     

    Poetry Writing Workshop helps students create 6-8 original poems while thinking critically about form, genre, and the canonical tradition of poetry. Students will respond to and write in an array of aesthetic traditions while also writing analytically about the poet’s tools of craft. Students will read widely and broadly in contemporary poetry, including four single-volume books of poetry. We will read and respond also to prose by poets, all in order to help us discover what makes a thing a poem, and what makes a poem successful. We will immerse ourselves in the world of poetry, in making what Lewis Turco calls “the art of language.”

     

    Prerequisite: ENG 103: Introduction to Creative Writing

    Counts for: Elective, Creative Writing minor