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Starr Center for the


Study of the American Experience

The Explore American Summer Internship Program (formerly known as Comegys Bight) provides Washington College students with unique opportunities to integrate their academic work with real-world practice, resulting in experiences that often change the course of their intellectual and professional lives. To read their stories, click the photos below.

  • Patrick Jackson ’19 is cataloging hundreds of images from the Cox collection.
    Through the Starr Center’s Explore America summer internship program, Patrick Jackson ’19 is working at the National American History Museum in the Photographic History Collection in Washington, D.C.
  • Through the Starr Center’s Explore America summer internship program, junior Madi Shenk is working at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C.

  • Ian Culcasi ’16, a history major, is spending his summer working at George Washington's Mount Vernon.

    His summer fellowship at George Washington’s Mount Vernon has given Ian Culcasi an in-depth and intimate view of the world of the nation’s first president.

  • Helping out with her supervisor’s project, Anna Zastrow ’17 takes colorimetry readings on an area of roof treated with...

    Through the Starr Center’s Explore America summer internship program, art and art history major Anna Zastrow ’17 is working at the Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute in Suitland, Maryland.

     

  • Aldo Ponterosso finished his year abroad at Washington College with a paid internship at the U.S. House of Representatives...
    After spending a year abroad at Washington College, Aldo Ponterosso ’16 is finishing up his time in America with an internship in Washington D.C. that is helping him better define his future.
  • Alex Foxwell ’16, with his grandmother, "Bubby," Belle Lewkowicz Ostroff, who inspired his passion for history...
    Working for UNESCO in Paris this summer on a Starr Center fellowship, Alex Foxwell ’16 discovered the terrible answer to a Second World War family mystery.