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The Rose O'Neill


Literary House

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  • July 10

    Going into our open reading period for Issue 5, we have a new Literary Shade Editor and a whole roster of new screeners ready to read your work.

     

    Kimberly Quiogue Andrews
    Beginning with Issue 5, Dr. Kimberly Quiogue Andrews is stepping into the role of Literary Shade Editor at Cherry Tree!

    She will be selecting submissions from poetry, fiction, and nonfiction to feature in the Literary Shade section of each new issue. All work submitted to our poetry, fiction, or nonfiction categories will be considered for inclusion in the Literary Shade feature section. Here’s a bit more about Dr. Andrews, who previously served as one of our contributing editors:

    Kimberly Quiogue Andrews is Assistant Professor of English and Creative Writing at Washington College. A poet and literary critic, she is the author of the chapbook BETWEEN (Finishing Line Press, 2018) and is currently working on a scholarly book that explores the interplay between literary-analytical modes of thinking and experimental poetic practice in and around the age of professionalized creative writing programs. Her critical work has appeared in Textual Practice and New Literary History, and her poems and essays have been published in the Los Angeles Review of Books, ASAP/J, Poetry Northwest, Grist, The Recluse, BOMB, West Branch, and elsewhere. 

     

    If you’re not yet familiar with our Literary Shade feature, which we debuted in Issue 3, here’s a brief description of what we’re keeping a lookout for:

    In the great tradition of Jennie Livingston’s documentary, Paris is Burning, we are looking for impeccably-crafted shade. But not just ordinary shade: we’re especially interested in poems, short stories, or nonfiction that throws shade at the institutions that have whitewashed our literature and history, be they laws or events or texts authored by dead old cisgendered white supremacist misogynistic homophobes. We believe that shade—subversive wit, withering critique—can empower. And we want to read the shadiest shade around.

     

    We have a few returning screeners from our previous reading period and some new faces from the spring 2018 Literary Editing & Publishing class at Washington College: 

    Allison Billmire

    Allison  Billmire

    MacKenzie Brady

    MacKenzie Brady

    Sam Clark

    Sam Clark

    Mary Golden

    Mary Golden

    Emily Holt

    Emily Holt

    Emily Kreider

    Emily Kreider

    Justin Nash

    Justin Nash

    Shannon Neal

    Shannon Neal

    Catalina Righter

    Catalina Righter

    Lonessa Rupertus

    Lonessa Rupertus

    Saoirse

    Saoirse

    Brooke Schultz

    Brooke Schultz

    Cate Shaw

    Cate Shaw

    Lauren Souder

    Lauren Souder

    Alexandra Weiss

    Alexandra Weiss

     

    Our Issue 5 open reading period runs from August 1-October 1, 2018!

    So please mark your calendars and send us your freshest (and shadiest) poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction starting August 1. To get a better idea of exactly what we’re looking for, check out our submission guidelines and read some sample work from our previous issues. We pay $20 per contributor, as well as two copies of the printed issue. And we are so excited to read your work!

  • June 27

    2018 Literary House Summer Intern Gabby Rente ’20 reports from the field.

    Nothing held my interest for long as a kid. Theater lasted a year, and softball only a season. But writing always remained my favorite activity. In high school, I wrote for my school newspaper and edited the literary magazine. Over the years, it developed into more than a hobby; it turned into a lifestyle.  I imagined going to a college or university that would spark my creativity and not just “mold” me into a writer but give me the tools and courage to persevere.

    On my first day of work at the Rose O’Neill Literary House, I walked around taut and nervous, wanting to make the best impression possible, but the staff quickly broke me from that trance and instead encouraged me to relax and drink tea during our first meeting. Here, interns become valuable team members working together to create a space for students’ ingenuity and writing to flourish.

    My first two weeks working at the Lit House have taught me several important lessons, such as hot air does indeed rise hence the library on the first floor provides a lovely, cool place to sit. Secondly, chalkboard paint refuses to yield to cleanliness. Persist, persist, persist. And use a sponge!

    Our first week consisted mostly of tutorials on InDesign. I can now confidently say I possess the ability to make something decent on InDesign; book cover, literary event poster, pamphlet, you name it!

    Of course, the entire week did not require us sitting in front of a screen. In the back of the Lit House lies the letterpress print shop. Here, we learned how to measure and cut high-quality paper, select and mix ink by hand, and print using antique methods. We printed a second run of Carolyn Forché’s award-winning poem, “The Boatman.”

    The second week, my fellow intern and I cataloged all the broadsides and posters on the Lit House walls.  These charming posters, covering nearly every inch of vertical space, go all the way back to the late 60s, documenting events and readings to which the house has borne witness. Some visiting writers include amazing people like Natasha Trethewey, Neil Gaiman, Allen Ginsberg, and even Toni Morrison. 

    We held the honor of helping select which broadsides and posters would appear in classrooms in one of the College’s academic halls. My favorite poster promoted a play called “La Vida es Sueño” from 1982, and now it will hang in the lecture halls for my fellow WC students to see. I hope they take the play’s title to heart and give their own dreams life.  

    The Lit House just hosted its Summer Literary Salon, and no, it’s not where writers go to get their hair done. I like to call it “a conglomeration of writing nerds under one roof to read literary works and talk weird experiences.” Our visitors were H.G. Carrillo, David MacLean, Lynn Melnick, and the Literary House’s 2018 Cave Canem Fellow, Lauren Russell, each of whom spoke about their individual inspirations. One visiting writer I tied myself into a nervous knot over, but eventually he signed the book I bought and gave me a hug afterwards. I then promptly rushed myself upstairs and out of sight to have an ecstatic fit before returning myself to the social scene in one calm piece.

    cake frosting gifThis internship, while quite rewarding, also requires focused work, using skills seen in other job fields. We have collected and condensed information into multiple spreadsheets on Excel and Google Sheets, conducted research on soon-to-be visiting writers, and created literary-themed trivia questions for the upcoming Cherry Tree Young Writer’s Conference. Where is the best place to have a summer internship? Answer: The Rose O’Neill Literary House.

    This is merely the frosting on the many layered, colorfully complex cake that represents the Rose O’Neill Literary House in this strange metaphor. My apologies if I made you crave cake.

  • June 27

    2018 Literary House Summer Intern Tamia Williams ’21 reports from the field.

    Welcome, Player One! You have successfully installed the hit new game Storm the Castle and the prize awaits you. To begin in story mode, begin here.

    You enter the Kingdom of Chestertown as an ordinary student at Washington College. As a new player, your first step is to gain knowledge and XP by attending classes and forming guilds – called ‘Friend Groups’ – who provide emotional support. Tales of the Rose O’Neill Literary Castle and infiltration methods circulate the campus – eventually, a definite opening presents itself as an internship. Begin the raid!

    Hobbit charge gif

    Level 1: The Gate and the Test of Sight. The wooden porch protects the main entrance of the castle with white chairs placed so the watchmen can survey the land. In the future, once you have won the game, you will be welcome to sit at those stations with fellow champions, a light waft fluttering through the trees. You’ll name local bunnies hopping out of the bushes Hamilton and Marsha. For now, though, you penetrate through the gate.

    Through the door lies the mural room, the Room of 1,000 Eyes – or, more likely, 48. Here begins the Test of Sight, where you look upon the faces of authors as they stare back. You search the walls, trying to discern the name for each face. As nothing comes, you begin to lose hope…until voila! You spot a hidden door with the names of each author. Satisfied, you endeavor forward. As you walk, you look forward to the day when you can eat pot stickers and various cheeses under the authors’ watchful eyes.

    Level 2: The Library, the dreaded Test of Distraction. Here, they prey upon your love of reading. You could stop now, sit on the couch, and read one of the many books. You falter, taking a -20 HP hit! You regain your wits and press on, so that one day you’ll be able to appreciate the aesthetic of the bookshelves in peace. One day, you’ll gain camera skills and learn how to capture photos of actual book signings. You’ll soon practice conversational skills and speak one-on-one with modern-day writers like David MacLean, H. G. Carrillo, Lauren Russell, and more. So you advance…

    …into the Reading Room, where the Test of Ascertainment awaits. Here, you will later participate in an official staff meeting, where you’ll listen, learn, and acquire the skills necessary to conducting a literary salon: creating a professional space, displaying kindness to all guests, and more. Here, you will attend poem and memoir readings. The Reading Room is where you will meet friendly townies like Joe and experiment with seemingly useless light switches. For now, nothing challenges you, so you march forward.

    Level 3: The Chambers. The first – the chamber of the Mighty Armstrong – remains shut. Luckily, the second holds a checkpoint, the Lusby Lovely Chamber. In the Lusby Lovely Chamber, you marvel at the cute kittens resting among calming lilac. You regain your HP with the toast sprung from the mythical Topaz Typewriter and the time for relaxation ends. As all gamers know, checkpoints come before the harder levels – in this case, the final level.

    Level 4: The Boss level. You faced and surmounted the previous tests in order to acquire the internship and obtain the final prize. In this level, you must vanquish the boss – in other words, impress him. You hit him with the traditional combo: charming smile and articulate speech. Press ‘Y’ a few times for classy jokes and swivel the joystick like a hammer throw to add in plenty of past experience and relevant personal information and…you’ve done it! You stand, shake his hand, and accept the internship.

    You are then ushered to the holy land: the Conference Room! In the Conference Room, you will learn to use InDesign to create posters, digital books, brochures, etc. Here, you will improve your research capabilities by reviewing information about writers and future guests. Here, you will learn the basics of writing simple, effective, and grammatically correct questions for literary trivia. As an intern, you will improve your printing dexterity by creating beautiful broadsides and posters. You’ll also learn the inner workings of the Washington College website by posting event listings for the Literary Castle. While one duty will be to catalog broadsides and other announcements, this will be a learning opportunity for improving organizational competence in Google and Microsoft programs. With dedication and more XP, you will even level up to Program Assistant during events and execute tours of the castle (which feel both terrifying and oddly satisfying).

    congrats gif

    So, congratulations Player One! You have successfully stormed and conquered the castle. The prize, knowing that you have made a positive mark – your mark – on the Rose O’Neill Literary Castle and have grown as an editing and publishing professional, is now yours. 

  • June 8

    Get caught up on your summer reading at the Literary House Press. We’ve got plenty of (literary) shade over here!

    From June 15 through July 6, the Literary House Press will be offering special summer deals to our online shoppers. For these few midsummer weeks, we are giving away free gifts with certain purchases:

    • Buy a 2-year subscription to Cherry Tree, get a free Cherry Tree tote bag!

    • Buy 2 of our standard edition chapbooks, get the third free!

    • Buy any 2 LHP broadsides, get a third free! After purchase, email with your third broadside choice.

     

    Midsummer Sale

  • April 26

    Join us this May for a special subscription drive in celebration of Literary Shade.

     

    May subscription drive

     

    Everyone who buys a 2-year subscription between May 1 & 31, will also receive a free letterpress broadside of our Literary Shade illustration hand-colored and signed by artist Stu Cawley.

     

    Here’s a close-up of this gorgeous new broadside:

    Literary Shade broadside

    Celebrate Literary Shade with us this May at Cherry Tree! Subscribe here.

  • April 26

    Brooke Schultz ’18 reflects on her semester working behind the scenes at the Literary House Press: editing, designing, marketing, and more.

    Catalog Notes, page 1

     

    Catalog Notes, page 2

     

    Catalog Notes, page 3

     

    Catalog Notes, page 4

     

    Catalog Notes, page 5

     

    Catalog Notes, page 6

     

    You can see the digital edition of the 2018 Literary House Press catalog here. The paper ones are at the printers and will be here the second week of May!

  • April 18

    At the 2018 Senior Reading, the Rose O’Neill Literary House announced this year’s winners of three annual student creative writing prizes: The Literary House Genre Fiction Prize, The William W. Warner Prize for Creative Writing on Nature and the Environment, and The Jude & Miriam Pfister Poetry Prize.

    Our 2018 Winners & Honorable Mentions for the Lit House Student Writing Prizes

     

    The Literary House Genre Fiction Prize is a prize awarded to a Washington College undergraduate for the best work of science fiction, fantasy, mystery, or horror. The winner receives a cash prize of $500.

    This year’s Genre Fiction Prize was awarded to senior Brooke Schultz for her short story, “The Women Who Seek.” Honorable Mention for the prize was awarded to senior Hope Watland for her short story, “Hounds.”

     

    The William W. Warner Prize is awarded to the Washington College undergraduate who shows the greatest aptitude for writing about nature and the environment. This prize is named for, and was endowed in the honor of, William W. Warner, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book Beautiful Swimmers: Watermen, Crabs and the Chesapeake Bay, based on his experiences living and working among crab fishermen on the Chesapeake. According to Mr. Warner’s wishes, the judges will give preference to—but will in no way limit their consideration to—students who write about the natural history of our Atlantic Littoral, from the Canadian Arctic to the Gulf of Florida. The winner receives a cash prize of $500.

    This year’s Warner Prize was awarded to senior Caroline Harvey for her essay, “We Search for Spiders.” Honorable Mention for the prize was awarded to sophomore Kai Clarke for her essay, “A Small Broken Wild.”

     

    The Jude & Miriam Pfister Poetry Prize was created through the Academy of American Poets, one of the nation’s most influential poetry organizations, and is administered through the Washington College Department of English and the Rose O’Neill Literary House. The prize is awarded to a Washington College undergraduate for a single poem and the winner receives a cash prize of $100 and a certificate from the Academy of American Poets.

    This year’s Pfister Poetry Prize was awarded to senior Mallory Smith for her poem “Proper Greetings.” Honorable Mention for the prize was awarded to junior Erin Caine for her poem “Song from an Adjacent Room.”

     

    We offer our most sincere congratulations to this year’s prize winners for their fine writing!

  • April 13

    On Saturday, April 28 the Literary House Press will be at the inaugural Chesapeake Printers Fair in Havre de Grace, Maryland!

     

    The Literary House Press will be bringing its current offerings of letterpress broadsides and chapbooks to exhibit and sell at this first festival for regional letterpress printers, bookmakers, and printmakers in downtown Havre de Grace. 

    Here’s a little more about the Chesapeake Printers Fair, from the festival website:

    The Chesapeake Printers Fair showcases the design and craft of all paper arts, from letterpress, print and book arts, paper making too. Held simultaneously—just a block away—from the very successful JoRetro’s PyrexFest, the Printers Fair promises to have strong traffic, sharing a devoted and sophisticated demographic.

    There will be food trucks, beverage tastings, demonstrations and, fingers crossed, a beautiful day. Event will be held rain or shine, 10am–3pm.

     

    And here’s the official vendor list, which is still growing! This event is being sponsored, organized, and hosted by Glyph

    So please mark your calendars for April 28 and come see us at the Chesapeake Printers Fair!

  • April 6

    This is a guest blog post by 2018 Literary House Press Intern, Brooke Schultz ’18.

    When I was a prospective student in the throes of touring campuses and doing interviews, I was instantly infatuated with the Rose O’Neill Literary House. As I was making my decision on a college, I remembered when I had walked up the steps to the sprawling porch and followed a small crowd into the foyer. The hub of all things literary was one of the first—and frankly, the most important thing—I had seen thus far.

    Fast forward a few years, when, as a senior, I saw the application for Press Intern come out again. I texted my friend.

    You were the Press Intern once, right?

    Yep!!!! she answered.

    I’m thinking of applying.

    Do it!!!!

    For the past few years, I had held positions that seemed to circle around the Literary House (and, by extension, the Literary House Press). I had worked as News Editor for The Elm, the college’s student newspaper, and then became Editor-in-Chief.  I became prose editor for The Collegian, the College’s undergraduate literary journal. Over the summer, I screened fiction for Cherry Tree, the national literary journal based at the College that ran out of the Literary House Press. All of these positions helped prepare me for the central goal of the Literary House Press: to disseminate the voices from a variety of backgrounds and experiences. I was excited for the opportunity to work with an organization that did that.

    Having been on the editorial side of a newspaper, I was familiar with what that concept looked like; but dipping into that aspect of an entire press—while considering things like marketing and promoting the Press—was new and exciting.

    That Same Friend who pushed me to apply was sitting on the floor next to me when I got the email offering me the position. I, in a haste to absorb it, read it wrong first and thought I had kindly been rejected. I started to say so, until my eyes finally found the “Congratulations!” I went through a range of emotions in a very short amount of time.

    Since then, I worked with the Social Media & Marketing intern, Mai Do, to come up with some ideas to drum up excitement for the release of Cherry Tree, Issue 4 and think of ways to keep that momentum going throughout the next few months. It’s not hard to come up with promotion ideas when you truly believe in the things the Literary House Press produces. Our brainstorming led to the idea to utilize an artistic representation of Literary Shade—a section unique to Cherry Tree—and make a letterpress print out of it.

    As this internship has continued, I’ve been able to take the foundation of the Press Intern before me and design a new catalog featuring Literary House Press items from this year. It has been educational and insightful learning how to lay out a book; getting to turn my hands purple mixing ink to get the perfect shot for the cover; and meeting with Literary House Director, James Allen Hall, and Assistant Director, Lindsay Lusby, to discuss the various drafts.

    Ultimately, when I walk up to my computer at the window each week and make myself a cup of tea in a Lit House mug, the initial excitement of being a part of a place like this resurfaces. Over the next month, I’m looking forward to the final draft of the Literary House Press catalog, and seeing the print come to life. 

  • April 4

    The Rose O’Neill Literary House has awarded this year’s Cave Canem Residency to Lauren Russell.

    In June 2018, the Rose O’Neill Literary House will welcome Lauren to Chestertown for a month-long writer’s retreat. She was selected from this year’s pool of applicants as the winner of the Literary House’s 2018 Cave Canem Summer Residency

    While most of her time will be spent working on her own writing projects and quietly exploring the town, Lauren will also be a part of the Summer Literary Salon on Tuesday, June 19 at 4:30PM, sharing the stage with writers H.G. Carrillo, David Stuart MacLean, and Lynn Melnick, along with local musicians The Pam Ortiz Band.

    Lauren Russell is the author of What’s Hanging on the Hush (Ahsahta, 2017). A Cave Canem graduate fellow, she was the 2014-2015 Jay C. and Ruth Halls Poetry Fellow at the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, the 2016 VIDA Fellow to the Home School, and a 2017 National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Fellow in poetry. She is a research assistant professor and is assistant director of the Center for African American Poetry and Poetics at the University of Pittsburgh.

    The Cave Canem Summer Residency at The Rose O’Neill Literary House is a partnership with Cave Canem, the nation’s preeminent organization for young African American poets. Cave Canem’s mission is to serve as “a home for the many voices of African American poetry and is committed to cultivating the artistic and professional growth of African American poets.” Our Cave Canem Summer Residency is a month-long Chestertown retreat offered annually to one outstanding former Cave Canem Fellow. Previous Summer Residents include poets Laura Swearingen-Steadwell (2017), Darrel Alejandro Holnes (2016), Kamilah Aisha Moon (2015), Jamaal May (2014), Yona Harvey (2013), Kevin Vaughn (2012), and Arisa White (2011). 

  • March 28

    Join us this April for a special subscription drive in celebration of poetry.

     

    April subscription drive

     

    For National Poetry Month, Cherry Tree is giving away free poetry! Everyone who buys a 2-year subscription between April 1 & 30, will also receive a free copy of the Literary House Press poetry anthology The Book of Scented Things: 100 Contemporary Poems About Perfume, edited by Jehanne Dubrow & Lindsay Lusby.

    Stop & smell the cherry blossoms with us this April at the Literary House Press & Cherry Tree! Subscribe here.

  • February 23

    Very soon, the Rose O’Neill Literary House will be traveling to Tampa, Florida for the 51st annual AWP Conference from March 7-10. We will be bringing along four Washington College students to represent us in the Bookfair and to attend as many panels and readings as they can. Here’s where you can find us at the Conference.

     

    AWP18 banner

     

    Our students will be staffing Booth 717 in the Bookfair, where we’ll have copies of our Literary House Press books and broadsides, including our newest chapbook Scream (or never minding), by Lia Purpura. We’ll also be debuting a few brand-new publications just in time for the Conference.

    Our fifth AWP Commemorative Broadside features a poem first published in the new anthology Reading Queer. “God and the G-Spot,” by Ellen Bass is now a piece of letterpress-printed art. The author has signed the entire limited edition and they will be available for purchase in the Bookfair at the special Conference-exclusive price of $15 each!

     

    Ellen Bass broadside

     

    The fourth issue of Cherry Tree will also debut there, featuring new poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and literary shade from Hussain Ahmed, Derrick Austin, Jan Beatty, Nicky Beer, Ron Currie, Jr., Christopher DeWeese, Chelsea Dingman, Piotr Florczyk, Berry Grass, Gillian Haines, Barbara Hamby, Leslie Harrison, Eleanor Hooker, Isabelle Hughes, Rosemary Jones, Julie Kane, Jenna Le, Jenn Leiker, James McCorkle, Michelle McGurk, Jessica Murray, Maria Nazos, Lucy Palmer, Alison Pelegrin, Ayesha Raees, Monica Isabel Restrepo, Alan Shapiro, SM Stubbs, Ellen Davis Sullivan, Anya Vostrova, Julie Marie Wade, Brian Phillip Whalen, Lesley Wheeler, Annie Julia Wyman, and Natalie Young. At a brimming 253 pages, this is our biggest issue yet. Grab your copy in the Bookfair for a special Conference price of $10 for a single issue or $20 for a 2-year subscription!

     

    Issue 4 full cover

     

    In addition to our exclusive lower prices at AWP, we’ll also be offering special Conference bundles at Booth 717! These offers will not be available after the Conference, so be sure to take advantage of them while they last:

    • Buy a 2-year Cherry Tree subscription, get a free tote bag!
    • Buy a copy of Still Life with Poem or The Book of Scented Things, get the commemorative broadside for just $10 more!
    • Buy any 2 Literary House Press books, get a free tote bag!
    • Buy any 2 Literary House Press broadsides, get a 3rd free!
    • For any purchase of $50 or more, get a free tote bag, hat, or water bottle!

    Come see us in Tampa! We can’t wait to be there!

  • February 21

    On February 15, 2018, we launched the newest issue of Cherry Tree! And there was cake.

     

    launch party

     

    We are so incredibly excited to be able to welcome the fourth issue of our beloved Cherry Tree into the world; and we are so grateful to all of you for sharing in our excitement!

    We kicked everything off with our Issue 4 Staff Launch Party on February 15. Our nearby editorial staff got together to eat pizza and cake, and to dig gluttonously into reading and admiring our new issue. 

    We also asked contributors, subscribers, and friends to fill Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram with their CT4 selfies & photos, using the hashtag #cherrybomb. And you did it!

     

     

    We got #cherrybomb photos from our fantastic contributors

    Julie Marie Wade CT4

     
    We got #cherrybomb photos from our lovely editorial staff

    Caroline Harvey CT4

     

    We got #cherrybomb photos from our wonderful subscribers

    Abby Wargo CT4

     

    We even got a #cherrybomb photo from our fabulous cover photographer: 

    CT4 Claudio Cricca

    Thanks to all of you (and your photogenic pets) for helping us to announce the arrival of CT4 to the social media world. You rock our cherry-loving world! And because we love them all so much, we have gathered all of your #cherrybomb photos in a happy little gallery you can flip through here: 

    P.S. If you haven’t subscribed yet, do it now

  • January 12

    On Thursday, January 11, we sent our newest, most beautiful issue yet to the printers. So it’s time for our annual cover art reveal!

     

    The art on the cover of issue 4 is a photograph called “Children Running in Backlight (Dozza, Italy),” by Italian artist Claudio Cricca. We just love the vibrant color, motion, and light captured in this photograph. We strongly believe the incredible writing in this issue has these same luminous qualities.

    Inside the issue is brand-new poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and literary shade from Hussain Ahmed, Derrick Austin, Jan Beatty, Nicky Beer, Ron Currie, Jr., Christopher DeWeese, Chelsea Dingman, Piotr Florczyk, Berry Grass, Gillian Haines, Barbara Hamby, Leslie Harrison, Eleanor Hooker, Isabelle Hughes, Rosemary Jones, Julie Kane, Jenna Le, Jenn Leiker, James McCorkle, Michelle McGurk, Jessica Murray, Maria Nazos, Lucy Palmer, Alison Pelegrin, Ayesha Raees, Monica Isabel Restrepo, Alan Shapiro, SM Stubbs, Ellen Davis Sullivan, Anya Vostrova, Julie Marie Wade, Brian Phillip Whalen, Lesley Wheeler, Annie Julia Wyman, and Natalie Young. At a spine-cracking 253 pages, this new issue breaks our Cherry Tree records for biggest issue on the books!

    Cherry Tree, Issue 4 cover

    The issue is officially released on February 15, 2018 and will be shipped out to contributors and subscribers at that time. We will also debut Issue 4 at the AWP Conference in Tampa from March 8-10. We’ll have copies available in the Bookfair at the Rose O’Neill Literary House booth #717, along with the rest of our Literary House Press publications and swag.

    And if you haven’t already, today is the perfect day to subscribe! Starting today, all new subscriptions will begin with Issue 4. 

  • November 16

    This holiday season at the Literary House Press: buy a gift for a friend, and get a free gift for you! Check out these Lit House Door Busters.

    From November 24 through December 20, the Literary House Press will be offering special holiday deals to our online shoppers. For the 2017 winter holiday season, we are giving away free gifts with certain purchases:

    • Buy a 2-year subscription to Cherry Tree, get a free Cherry Tree tote bag!

    • Buy 2 of our standard edition chapbooks, get the third free!

    • Buy any 2 LHP broadsides, get a third free! After purchase, e-mailllusby2@washcoll.edu with your third broadside choice.

     

     

    See our deluxe & standard edition chapbooks here.

    See our letterpress broadsides here.

    All purchases may be made through our online form here

    Please note: The Literary House Press web payment form will NOT work properly if used in Microsoft Edge or Explorer. Please use a different web browser to complete your purchase, such as Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, or Apple Safari.

    And don’t forget to check out our paperback books, available on Small Press Distribution and Amazon! 

     

    Happy Holidays from the staff at the Literary House Press!

     

     

  • November 8

    Issue 3 was our biggest issue so far. Our upcoming fourth issue is going to be even bigger!

     

    Here’s our final list of contributors for Issue 4 of Cherry Tree:

     

    POETRY

    • Hussain Ahmed
    • Jan Beatty
    • Nicky Beer
    • Chelsea Dingman
    • Piotr Florczyk
    • Barbara Hamby
    • Leslie Harrison
    • Eleanor Hooker
    • Julie Kane
    • Jenna Le
    • James McCorkle
    • Jessica Murray
    • Alison Pelegrin
    • Ayesha Raees
    • Alan Shapiro
    • SM Stubbs
    • Natalie Young

    FICTION

    • Ron Currie, Jr.
    • Isabelle Hughes
    • Michelle McGurk
    • Lucy Palmer
    • Ellen Davis Sullivan

    NONFICTION

    • Berry Grass
    • Gillian Haines
    • Rosemary Jones
    • Monica Isabel Restrepo
    • Anya Vostrova
    • Brian Phillip Whalen
    • Annie Julia Wyman

    LITERARY SHADE

    • Derrick Austin
    • Christopher DeWeese
    • Jenn Leiker
    • Maria Nazos
    • Julie Marie Wade
    • Lesley Wheeler

    Thank you to our fantastic student screeners: Allison Billmire, Caroline Harvey, Emily Holt, Jeannie “Saoirse,” Ryan Manning, Catalina Righter, Amy Rohn, Brooke Schultz, Cate Shaw, Hope Watland, Emma Way, and Casey Williams. Thank you as well to our fabulous senior readers in poetry: Julia Armstrong and Alex Vidiani; in fiction: Sarah Blackman and Elise Gallagher; and in nonfiction: Elise Gallagher (again!). And a huge round of applause for our Poetry & Literary Shade Editor James Allen Hall (who is also our Editor-in-Chief), our Fiction Editor Roy Kesey, and our Creative Nonfiction Editor Emma Sovich. Issue 4 is only possible because all of the volunteer work that you all do for Cherry Tree.

    The issue is now being laid out by our two-time Production Intern Caroline Harvey. Proofs will be sent out to all contributors in late December or early January. Issue 4 is scheduled for release on February 15, 2018, and then it will debut at the 2018 AWP Conference in Tampa in March. So if you do not have a current subscription, now is the perfect time to remedy that! Buy a subscription for yourself or as a holiday gift for a dear friend. Just subscribe! And you can do that here

     

  • October 26

    The Cave Canem Summer Residency at the Rose O’Neill Literary House is awarded annually to a current Fellow with Cave Canem, a national organization dedicated to growth of African American poets. For the 2018 residency, applications will be accepted through Thursday, March 15, 2018.

     

    In June 2017, poet Laura Swearingen-Steadwell came to Chestertown for a month-long writer’s retreat. Her main responsibility while here: to focus on her own writing, whether that be working on her next poetry collection or another personal writing project that she had been waiting to find the right time to get started on. At the Cave Canem Summer Residency at the Rose O’Neill Literary House, we make now the right time.

    After a month of writing and reading and exploring the quiet, rural town and campus, Laura also gave a reading from her work at the June Summer Literary Salon at the Literary House, alongside fiction-writer Jen Michalski and local musical group Harp & Soul.

     

    Now we’re looking for our 2018 Summer Resident and applications are open! Here are more details about how to apply:

     

    The Cave Canem Residency at The Rose O’Neill Literary House includes a public reading as part of the annual Summer Poetry Salon Series. The Fellow is awarded the use of a private, single-family residence for the entire month of June, along with a $1000 honorarium for living expenses. The Fellow also has the option of a private manuscript consultation with the Interim Director of the Literary House, poet James Allen Hall. 

    Applicants should send a brief statement of purpose, a CV, and a 10-page poetry sample to Director James Allen Hall:

    The Rose O’Neill Literary House

    Washington College

    300 Washington Avenue

    Chestertown, Maryland 21620

     

    For the 2018 Cave Canem Residency at The Rose O’Neill Literary House, applications will be accepted if postmarked by March 15, 2018. The winning candidate will be notified no later than March 31, 2018.

     

  • October 5

    Scream (or never minding), by Lia Purpura will soon be available for purchase from the Literary House Press.

    This fall, the Literary House Press will launch a new letterpress chapbook called Scream (or never minding), a Pushcart Prize-winning lyric essay by Baltimore-writer Lia Purpura. A celebratory event will be held on Thursday, October 19 at 4:30 p.m. at Washington College’s Rose O’Neill Literary House, featuring a reading by the author. This event is free and open to the public. The Rose O’Neill Literary House is located at 407 Washington Avenue in Chestertown, Maryland.

     

    In the LHP publication of Scream, Purpura’s essay is illustrated by Stuart Cawley, whose artistic renderings return both dimension and power to objects—exactly what Purpura enacts with her prose. Her essay explores the unsavory origins of our comfort and convenience—animals driven mad in industrial farms, art that had once been an intimate glimpse into a creator’s vision, objects mass-produced only to be thrown away. All of these are now a “gesture performed over and over, on coffee mugs, tote bags, key chains, and cards, it’s much reduced, quieted so as to be understood. Seeing the scream again and again, we agree not to.” Purpura forces the reader to breach the distance between the dignity of identity and the objectification inherent in a capitalist system, a cause that this publication embodies: every copy of Scream is handmade in the letterpress studio at the Rose O’Neill Literary House, where tools do indeed become “a hand’s extension.”

    Lia Purpura is the author of eight collections of essays, poems, and translations. She has been awarded fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the NEA, and the Fulbright Foundation, in addition to four Pushcart Prizes, a grant from the Maryland State Arts Council, and multiple residencies at several artists’ colonies including MacDowell. Her work has been published and anthologized widely. She lives in Baltimore, where she is currently the Writer in Residence at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. She also teaches at the Rainier Writing Workshop in Tacoma, WA. 

    Scream (or never minding) will be released in two unique editions. The deluxe letterpress edition ($185), which is letterpress-printed and hand-bound in hardcover, will be available at select independent bookstores and direct from the publisher. The standard paperback edition ($15), which is digitally-printed and perfect bound, will be available for purchase through Small Press Distribution, select independent bookstores, and direct from the publisher.

    Please contact the Literary House Press (llusby2@washcoll.edu) if you are interested in a review copy.

     

  • October 3

    We’ve just closed for submissions for Issue 4, and while we continue to read our way through it all, here are the pieces from our last issue that we have nominated for the 2018 Pushcart Prizes.

     

    • Out-of-Office, by R.M. Fradkin 
    • Sex with Jesus, by Michael Walsh 
    • To the Ten White Ten-Year-Olds in Indiana who Called a Friend “Nigger,” by Phillip B. Williams 
    • Gun Show Loophole, by Erika Meitner 
    • Mixed Tag, by Michael Chin 
    • Body, by Tyler Mills 

    Congratulations to our Issue 3 nominees! We wish you the best of luck!

     

  • July 24

    Although most of the faces are the same, we’ve had some shuffling of positions on the Cherry Tree masthead. Here is our current editorial staff, going into our fourth issue:

     

    Founding Editor: Jehanne Dubrow

    Editor-in Chief: James Allen Hall

    Managing Editor: Lindsay Lusby

    Poetry Editor: James Allen Hall

    Fiction Editor: Roy Kesey

    Creative Nonfiction: Emma Sovich

    Literary Shade Editor: James Allen Hall

    Senior Poetry Readers: Julia Armstrong & Alex Vidiani

    Senior Fiction Readers: Sarah Blackman & Elise Gallagher

    Senior Nonfiction Reader: Elise Gallagher

    Production Intern: Caroline Harvey ’18

    Contributing Editors: Kimberly Q. Andrews, Eric Lorberer, Robert Mooney, Erin Murphy, Peter Turchi, Katherine Wagner, and Laura Maylene Walter

    And here are our fresh-faced Issue 4 screeners, who are all current Washington College students or recent grads:

    Allison Billmire

    Caroline Harvey

    Emily Holt

    Jeannie

    Ryan Manning

    Catalina Righter

    Amy Rohn

    Brooke Schultz

    Cate Shaw

    Hope Watland

    Emma Way

    Casey Williams

     

    We are all incredibly excited to read your poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and literary shade when we open for Issue 4 submissions on August 1!

     

    In further news, beginning with our next issue, Cherry Tree is now a paying market for writers! Each contributor to Issue 4 will receive $20 for their work, in addition to the usual 2 contributors’ copies of the issue. Although this truly isn’t enough to compensate writers for what their work is worth, we’re hoping that this is just the beginning and we’ll be able to offer more in the future.

    Submit your best poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and literary shade on August 1 and GET PAID!

     

  • May 16

    “There’s so much originality in this volume. Each piece reveals a look at some aspect of life, perhaps not yours, but perhaps about the person across the way. And each voice is alluring, accomplished, and engaging.” Issue three receives a positive review at NewPages.

     

    Cherry Tree’s third issue received further praise in a new review by Valerie Wieland published at NewPages.

    The following contributors got shoutouts for their work: R.M. FradkinMichael ChinJulie L. MooreMichael WalshNan ByrneErika MeitnerTyler MillsKate Anger, and Rajiv Mohabir. Well done, y’all!

    Read the full review here: Cherry Tree 2017 at NewPages.

    And then subscribe, subscribe, subscribe!

     

  • May 3

    The Rose O’Neill Literary House has named the winner of the 2018 Mary Wood Fellowship, novelist and short story-writer Amber Dermont.

    In April 2018, we will host fiction-writer Amber Dermont for a 3-day residency as our 2018 Mary Wood Fellow. The Mary Wood Fellowship is a nationwide competition and Amber was selected from a pool of more than 30 outstanding applicants. As part of her duties while in-residence, Amber will hold one-on-one meetings with a select group of female student fiction-writers. She will also participate in two public events, giving a craft talk and a reading from her work.

    Amber Dermont is the author of the novel, The Starboard Sea (St. Martin’s Press, 2012), and the short story collection, Damage Control (St. Martin’s, 2013).  A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, Dermont received her PhD in literature and creative writing from the University of Houston. Her short fiction has appeared in TriQuarterly, Tin House, Zoetrope: All-Story, and in the anthologies Best New American Voices, Best American Nonrequired Reading, The Worst Years of Your Life, and Home of the Brave. A recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment of the Arts, InPrint, the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, and the Sewanee Writers’ Conference, she is currently an associate professor of English and creative writing at Rice University in Houston, Texas.  She is at work on another novel called The Laughing Girl. 

    The Mary Wood Fellowship at The Rose O’Neill Literary House is awarded biennially to a female-identifying writer—in poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction—who has published at least one book. The Fellowship enables female creative writing students at Washington College to work with and learn from successful female writers like Nicky Beer, Shara Lessley, Laura van den Berg, Hannah Tinti, and Irina Reyn, who spend five days on campus. Eastern Shore author Mary Wood, whose support makes the fellowship possible, is a ’68 graduate of the College and a former member of its Board of Visitors and Governors.

     

  • April 27

    “I’d gladly sit in this cherry tree’s shade.” Our third issue receives high praise from literary magazine reviewers at The Review Review.

     

    Cherry Tree’s third issue has received a glowing 5-star review from Nicholas Olson at The Review Review. Here’s an excerpt: 

    “This lit mag offers a welcome variety of forms, all of them trending toward the conventional while still taking stylistic risks. The pieces it publishes get in when they need to and leave right on time. Characterizations are fresh, novel, and telling, and there’s an emphasis placed on the quality of prose on a sentence by sentence basis. Writers would do well to submit stories with strong characterizations or poems that exhibit a mastery of language. Given the quality of the material presented, I’d gladly sit in this cherry tree’s shade.”

    Quite a number of our contributors got shoutouts for their work: Stephanie DickinsonR.M. FradkinAshley RobertsonPhillip B. WilliamsShara LessleyRajiv Mohabir, and Kate Anger. We’re so proud of this issue and the amazing work our contributors have produced. 

    Read the full review here: “Sufferings That Touch the Heart in Powerful New Lit Mag”

    And, of course, subscribe here!

     

  • April 21

    At the 2017 Senior Reading, the Rose O’Neill Literary House announced this year’s winners of three annual student creative writing prizes: The Literary House Genre Fiction Prize, The William W. Warner Prize for Creative Writing on Nature and the Environment, and The Jude & Miriam Pfister Poetry Prize.

    Left to right: Erin Caine '19, Lily Starr '17, Roswell Wells '18, Director James Allen Hall, Heidi Butler '17, Kailani Clarke '20Left to right: Erin Caine '19, Lily Starr '17, Roswell Wells '18, Director James Allen Hall, Heidi Butler '17, Kailani Clarke '20
     

    The Literary House Genre Fiction Prize is a prize awarded to a Washington College undergraduate for the best work of science fiction, fantasy, mystery, or horror. The winner receives a cash prize of $500.

    This year’s prize was awarded to junior Roswell Wells for their short story, “Collateral Damage.”

     
    Sophomore Erin Caine received Honorable Mention for her short story, “Cassandra and Persephone in the Clock-House.”

     

    The William W. Warner Prize is awarded to the Washington College undergraduate who shows the greatest aptitude for writing about nature and the environment. This prize is named for, and was endowed in the honor of, William W. Warner, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book Beautiful Swimmers: Watermen, Crabs and the Chesapeake Bay, based on his experiences living and working among crab fishermen on the Chesapeake. According to Mr. Warner’s wishes, the judges will give preference to—but will in no way limit their consideration to—students who write about the natural history of our Atlantic Littoral, from the Canadian Arctic to the Gulf of Florida. The winner receives a cash prize of $500.

    This year’s Warner Prize was awarded to freshman Kailani Clarke for her piece, “The Rest of the World was Water.”

     

    Senior Heidi Butler received Honorable Mention for her piece, “On Earth as it is in Heaven.”

     

    The Jude & Miriam Pfister Poetry Prize was created through the Academy of American Poets, one of the nation’s most influential poetry organizations, and is administered through the Washington College Department of English and the Rose O’Neill Literary House. The prize is awarded to a Washington College undergraduate for a single poem and the winner receives a cash prize of $100 and a certificate from the Academy of American Poets.

    This year’s Pfister Poetry Prize was awarded to senior Lily Starr for her poem, “Portrait of Boy Dancing.”

     
    Junior Roswell Wells received Honorable Mention for their poem, “Detection and Care of Root-Rotted Thoughts.”

     

    We offer our most sincere congratulations to this year’s prize winners for their fine writing!

     

    The Rose O’Neill Literary House at Washington College serves as one of the cultural centers of campus, bringing together students, faculty, alumni, and local community members from across the disciplines. Our literary programming provides access to a wide variety of genres, including fiction, poetry,  creative nonfiction, scholarly prose, playwriting, and hybrid forms; our letterpress studio and Literary House Press introduce participants both to old and new technologies. We are dedicated to promoting the articulated word and to supporting students through professional, on-the-job training.

  • April 18

    The Rose O’Neill Literary House has awarded this year’s Cave Canem Residency to Laura Swearingen-Steadwell.

    In June 2017, the Rose O’Neill Literary House will welcome Laura to Chestertown for a month-long writer’s retreat. She was selected from this year’s pool of applicants as the winner of the Literary House’s 2017 Cave Canem Summer Residency

    While most of her time will be spent working on her own writing projects and quietly exploring the town, Laura will also be a part of our second Summer Poetry Salon on Tuesday, June 27 at 4:30PM, sharing the stage with fiction writer Jen Michalski.

    Laura Swearingen-Steadwell is a poet and editor living in Brooklyn. She won the 2016 Cave Canem Northwestern University Poetry Prize, and her second book, All Blue So Late, will be published by Northwestern University Press in November. She is a Cave Canem and Callaloo Fellow, and a graduate of the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College.

    The Cave Canem Summer Residency at The Rose O’Neill Literary House is a partnership with Cave Canem, the nation’s preeminent organization for young African American poets. Cave Canem’s mission is to serve as “a home for the many voices of African American poetry and is committed to cultivating the artistic and professional growth of African American poets.” Our Cave Canem Summer Residency is a month-long Chestertown retreat offered annually to one outstanding former Cave Canem Fellow. Previous Summer Residents include poets Darrel Alejandro Holnes in 2016, Kamilah Aisha Moon in 2015, and Jamaal May in 2014. 

     

    The Rose O’Neill Literary House at Washington College serves as one of the cultural centers of campus, bringing together students, faculty, alumni, and local community members from across the disciplines. Our literary programming provides access to a wide variety of genres, including fiction, poetry,  creative nonfiction, scholarly prose, playwriting, and hybrid forms; our letterpress studio and Literary House Press introduce participants both to old and new technologies. We are dedicated to promoting the articulated word and to supporting students through professional, on-the-job training.

  • March 31

    A guest blog post by Spring 2017 Literary House Press Intern Allison Billmire ’17.

    Back in December, I was nested in the common room of my suite. Ready to tackle the first of many final papers, my laptop was on, textbooks were open, and the Property Brothers were making a couple’s dream come true in the background.

    When I heard the “ping!” of the Outlook notification and saw that the email was from Lindsay Lusby, I minimized all of my Word documents and muted the TV, cutting off Jonathan’s explanation to the homeowners as to why they couldn’t just take out the loadbearing wall in order to achieve their open-concept dream. There is something about the need for complete silence in order to put in all of your focus on what’s in front of you, like turning down the volume on the car radio when you realize you’ve missed your turn. 

    When I read that I had been selected for the position of Press Intern for the 2016-2017 spring semester, I screamed. Then I called my mom.

    Not only was I excited to have gotten the job; I was thrilled to know that I would be working for the Rose O’Neill Literary House again.

    Two summers ago, I was the Student Editor for the Washington College Review, a literary journal composed of student works that range from poems to research papers. The Review has since gone digital, but the experience taught me what it takes for one to put together a book, skills that are crucial for an aspiring editor and publisher like myself. But while I had an understanding of how to produce a project, I knew nothing of what to do once it was completed—in other words, I had no idea how to market the very thing I had spent a summer creating.

    This is why the Press Internship caught my eye. In the past, the Press Intern has been tasked with the layout of the Literary House Press’ latest book, whether that is the annual literary journal, Cherry Tree, or the next poetry anthology. This semester, however, the Literary House wanted to focus on promoting the projects that were already on the shelves. When I read in the job description that the Press Intern would be asked to “help with the sale of publications through market research and the compilation of a catalog,” thereby contributing to the distribution process of a national literary magazine, etc., I knew I had to apply. Exploring the marketing and sales aspects of the publishing industry was exactly what I was looking for. Fast forward to December: as I lay sprawled on the common room floor talking excitedly on the phone, I was already imagining possible formats and fonts, and considering the best way to arrange the Literary House Press products across the page.

    I was left to dream throughout Finals Week and over the Winter Break. Whenever I gave myself a reprieve from my thesis, I investigated how other, longer-running publishers were organizing their catalogs. While this gave me some direction, such as what information to include for each book listed and how to create an order form, I knew I would be left to my own digression when it came to the layout for all of the Literary House broadsides.

    Because each broadside is unique, they vary in their dimensions. This made templates unusable for this section of the catalog, as the look of each spread depended on the number and orientation of the broadsides that would be featured on them. We decided, however, that this is in our best interest, as the lack of uniformity will keep consumers from becoming bored and simply flip through the pages. I would say that has been the most challenging aspect I have faced so far—rivaling even the moment I realized I would have to retake all of the photos I’d snapped because the sun had produced a glare on the framed broadsides.

    Now, four months later, the catalog is undergoing round after round of proofreading. With an adjustment of an image placement here and a center-justify there, it is almost ready to go to print! I would say that the majority of my time as Press Intern has overlapped significantly with my previous job as Student Editor, but I have picked up some sales and marketing tips along the way, including an understanding of bookseller discounts and return policies. In the coming weeks I will be compiling a list of all bookstores within a 200-mile radius of the Literary House in order to get an idea of who we will be sending our catalog to, as well as draft a letter of introduction. I’m looking forward to how the rest of the semester will go, and can’t wait to have the catalog in its tangible, page-turning form.

  • January 31

    Next week, the Rose O’Neill Literary House will be traveling to Washington, DC for the 50th annual AWP Conference from February 8-11. We will be bringing along six Washington College students to represent us in the Bookfair and to attend as many panels and readings as they can. Here’s where you can find us at the Conference.

     

    Bookfair

    Our students will be staffing Booth 626 in the Bookfair, where we’ll have copies of our Literary House Press books and broadsides, including our newest trade paperback Still Life with Poem. We’ll also be debuting a few brand-new publications just in time for the Conference.

    Our fourth AWP Commemorative Broadside features a poem first published by DC-based Split This Rock. “A Small Needful Fact,” by Ross Gay is now a piece of letterpress-printed art. The author will sign the entire limited edition and then they will be available for purchase for $20 each.

     

     

    The third issue of Cherry Tree will also be fresh from the printers, featuring new poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and literary shade from Eloisa Amezcua, Kate Anger, Sarah Blake, CL Bledsoe, Paul Bone, Kim Bridgford, Nan Byrne, Lauren Camp, Doritt Carroll, Michael Chin, Charlotte Covey, Heidi Czerwiec, Stephanie Dickinson, R.M. Fradkin, Avital Gad-Cykman, Melanie Graham, Dave Housley, Anna Kelley, Shara Lessley, Matthew Lippman, Raye Hendrix May, Damon McLaughlin, Erika Meitner, Lynn Melnick, Tyler Mills, Michael Mingo, Rajiv Mohabir, Julie L. Moore, John A. Nieves, Ashley Robertson, Martha Silano, Matthew Thorburn, Robert Vivian, Stacey Waite, Cody Walker, Michael Walsh, and Phillip B. Williams. At a whopping 218 pages, this is our biggest issue yet. Grab your copy in the Bookfair for a special Conference price!

     

     

    We’ll also be offering special Conference bundles at Booth 626. These offers will not be available after the Conference, so be sure to take advantage of them while they last:

    • Buy a 2-year Cherry Tree subscription, get a free tote bag!
    • Buy a copy of Still Life with Poem or The Book of Scented Things, get the commemorative broadside for just $10 more!
    • Buy any 2 Literary House Press books, get a free tote bag!
    • Buy any 2 Literary House Press broadsides, get a 3rd free!
    • For any purchase of $50 or more, get a free tote bag, hat, or water bottle!

     

    Offsite Reading

    To celebrate the launch of Issue 3, we are co-hosting an offsite reading with Baltimore-based Doctor T.J. Eckleburg Review on Thursday, February 9 from 9:00-11:00 p.m. at Busboys & Poets @ 5th & K.

    We’ll have readings from Cherry Tree contributors Michael Chin (fiction), Rajiv Mohabir (creative nonfiction), Lynn Melnick (poetry), and Julie Marie Wade (creative nonfiction), as well as readings by Eckleburg contributors and editors.

    So please mark your calendars and be sure to join us! The first 50 attendees will get free drink tickets.

     

    Candlelight Vigil

    On Saturday, February 11, we are joining our fellow co-sponsors for a Candlelight Vigil for Freedom of Expression from 6:15-7:30 p.m. at Lafayette Park, across from the White House. We invite writers assembled in DC for AWP to a Candlelight Vigil for Freedom of Expression. This basic freedom is threatened in new ways and with more intensity than in recent memory. As the nation’s poets and writers, editors and critics, we have a unique and vital obligation to stand watch over free speech and expression. May our candlelight vigil February 11 provide encouragement and focus to our watch in the coming years. Speakers include Kazim Ali, Gabrielle Bellot, Melissa Febos, Carolyn Forché, Ross Gay, Luis J. Rodriguez, Eric Sasson.

     

     

    See you at AWP!

  • January 12

    On Thursday, January 12, we sent our biggest and best issue yet off to the printers. Which means it’s time for our usual cover art reveal!

     

    The art on the cover of issue 3 is a painting called “Line Dance,” by Chestertown artist Marcy Dunn Ramsey. This painting showcases the beautiful reedy marsh-scape of our tiny Chester River wonderland here on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Previously exhibited in the Carla Massoni Gallery, “Line Dance” is now in the private collection of Drew and Betsy Vaden in Newport Beach, California.

    Inside the issue is brand-new poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and literary shade from Eloisa Amezcua, Kate Anger, Sarah Blake, CL Bledsoe, Paul Bone, Kim Bridgford, Nan Byrne, Lauren Camp, Doritt Carroll, Michael Chin, Charlotte Covey, Heidi Czerwiec, Stephanie Dickinson, R.M. Fradkin, Avital Gad-Cykman, Melanie Graham, Dave Housley, Anna Kelley, Shara Lessley, Matthew Lippman, Raye Hendrix May, Damon McLaughlin, Erika Meitner, Lynn Melnick, Tyler Mills, Michael Mingo, Rajiv Mohabir, Julie L. Moore, John A. Nieves, Ashley Robertson, Martha Silano, Matthew Thorburn, Robert Vivian, Stacey Waite, Cody Walker, Michael Walsh, and Phillip B. Williams. At a whopping 218 pages, this is our biggest issue yet!

    Although the issue is officially released on February 15, 2017, we will be debuting issue 3 at the AWP Conference in Washington, DC from February 9-11. We’ll have copies available in the Bookfair at the Rose O’Neill Literary House booth #626.

    And on Thursday, February 9, we will have our official launch eventCherry Tree is co-hosting a fabulous AWP offsite reading with Baltimore-based Doctor T.J. Eckleburg Review at Busboys & Poets @ 5th & K from 9:00-11:00 p.m. We’ll have readings from Cherry Tree contributors Michael Chin (fiction), Rajiv Mohabir (creative nonfiction), Lynn Melnick (poetry), and Julie Marie Wade (creative nonfiction), as well as readings by Eckleburg contributors and editors. So please mark your calendars and be sure to join us! The first 50 attendees will get free drink tickets (wink wink).

    And if you haven’t already, today is the perfect day to subscribe!

     

  • December 1

    This holiday season at the Literary House Press: buy a gift for a friend, and get a free gift for you!

     

    From December 5 through 19, the Literary House Press will be offering special holiday deals to our online shoppers. For the 2016 winter holiday season, we are giving away free gifts with certain purchases:

     

    Buy a 2-year subscription to Cherry Tree, get a free copy of issue 1 & a Cherry Tree tote bag!

     

    Buy any 2 LHP broadsides, get a third free! After purchase, email llusby2@washcoll.edu with your third broadside choice.

     

    For any purchase of $50 or more, get one free swag item: Rose O’Neill Literary House or Cherry Tree tote bag, a trucker hat (white/red or black/white), or a Nalgene water bottle. After purchase, email llusby2@washcoll.edu with your choice of swag item.

     

     

    See our deluxe & standard edition chapbooks here

    See our letterpress broadsides here.  

    All purchases may be made through our online form here. Please note: The Literary House Press web payment form will NOT work properly if used in Microsoft Edge or Explorer. Please use a different web browser to complete your purchase, such as Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, or Apple Safari. 

    And don’t forget to check out our paperback books, available on Small Press Distribution and Amazon!  

     

    Happy Holidays from the staff at the Literary House Press!

     

     

  • November 17

    Here’s our final list of contributors for issue 3 of Cherry Tree!

    Poetry: 

    • Eloisa Amezcua
    • Sarah Blake
    • CL Bledsoe
    • Paul Bone
    • Kim Bridgford
    • Nan Byrne
    • Lauren Camp
    • Doritt Carroll
    • Charlotte Covey
    • Melanie Graham
    • Anna Kelley
    • Shara Lessley
    • Matthew Lippman
    • Raye Hendrix May
    • Damon McLaughlin
    • Erika Meitner
    • Lynn Melnick
    • Michael Mingo
    • Julie L. Moore
    • John A. Nieves
    • Martha Silano
    • Matthew Thorburn
    • Stacey Waite
    • Cody Walker
    • Michael Walsh

     
    Fiction:

    • Michael Chin
    • Stephanie Dickinson
    • R.M. Fradkin
    • Avital Gad-Cykman
    • Dave Housley
    • Ashley Robertson

     

    Nonfiction:

    • Kate Anger
    • Heidi Czerwiec
    • Tyler Mills
    • Rajiv Mohabir
    • Robert Vivian

     

    Literary Shade:

    • Phillip B. Williams

     

    Thank you to our fantastic student screeners: Nicolas Anstett, Julie Armstrong, Reilly D. Cox, Dylan Hogan, Sarah Mann, Ryan Manning, Meaghan Menzel, Aliya Merhi, Catalina Righter, and Emma Way. Thank you as well to our fabulous senior readers in poetry: Emma Sovich and Alex Vidiani; in fiction: Sarah Blackman and Elise Gallagher; and in nonfiction: Elise Gallagher (again!). And a huge round of applause for our Creative Nonfiction & Literary Shade Editor James Allen Hall (who is also our Editor-in-Chief), our Poetry Editor Jehanne Dubrow, and our Fiction Editor Roy Kesey. Issue 3 is only possible because all of the volunteer work that you all do for Cherry Tree.

    The issue is now being laid out by our Production Intern Caroline Harvey. Proofs will be sent out to all contributors in late December. Issue 3 is scheduled for release on February 9, 2017 at the AWP Conference in DC. So if you do not have a current subscription, now is the perfect time to remedy that! Buy a subscription for yourself or as a holiday gift for a dear friend. Just subscribe! And you can do that here