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Modern Languages

NOTE: This page contains information from the 2012-2013 Catalog. It remains available for archival purposes only. For the most current WC Catalog content, please visit http://catalog.washcoll.edu and download this year’s edition.
Division of Humanities, Interdisciplinary Major

 

The Department of Modern Languages offers majors in French Studies, German Studies, Hispanic Studies, and International Literature and Culture. Our courses prepare students to live and work in the global community of the 21st century by giving them powerful tools for communicating and collaborating with people in the pluralist U.S. and abroad. Our courses have three main goals: 1. to foster critical thinking skills through an awareness of the power of language in its many contexts, 2. to provide linguistic training for students to develop proficiency in a foreign language, and 3. to promote intercultural competence for students to communicate effectively across diverse cultural lines. Our graduates pursue successful careers in most fields, including education, international education, journalism, social services, business, international business, economics, government, law, international law, and applied and theoretical sciences.

COURSES THAT FULFILL THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT

The Department offers courses appropriate to majors and minors in French Studies, German Studies, and Hispanic Studies, as well as courses given in English in the field of International Literature and Culture. It also offers language courses in Japanese and Latin, and occasionally in Arabic, Italian, and Portuguese. All language courses (101/102, 200/201/202 and 301/302) may be used to satisfy the foreign language requirement.

ALTERNATIVE LANGUAGE STUDY

After consultation with the chair a student may receive tutorial instruction in a language that is not part of the regular curriculum but for which expertise is available. Students who participate in this program are urged to follow up the year of study with a year abroad in a country where the language is spoken.

COURSES THAT FULFILL THE HUMANITIES DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENT

Courses in literature and film in the foreign language or International Literature and Culture, given in English, may be used to fulfill the distribution requirement in the Humanities. In some cases, where such action seems appropriate, the department chair may approve the use of foreign language literature courses to fulfill the foreign language requirement. In that case, those courses may not be used in fulfillment of the distribution requirement in Humanities as well.

LANGUAGE PLACEMENT

First-year and transfer students will be placed in the appropriate level language courses based upon the results of a language survey and placement test taken over the summer for all new students. The department strongly recommends that students planning further study of their high school foreign language enroll as early as possible in a course in that language to ensure their continued progress. It counsels students to plan their academic program so as to complete year-long distribution sequences without interruption.

MAJORS IN FRENCH STUDIES/GERMAN STUDIES/HISPANIC STUDIES

To major in either French, German or Hispanic Studies the student must take at least eight courses at the 300 and 400 levels and complete the Senior Capstone Experience. The courses chosen for the major must include:

  • Either 301 or 302 (or an equivalent taken abroad).
  • Either 303 or 304 in French, 303, 304, or 305 in Spanish or 304 or 305 in German, to be taken on the Washington College campus.
  • At least two courses at the 400 level, one of which must be taken during the senior year.

As a general rule, at least four of the courses presented for the major must be taken on the Washington College campus unless otherwise agreed upon by the faculty advisor. Students may count courses given in English under the International Literature and Culture heading toward their major if their written work is done in the foreign language.

The Department requires its majors in a foreign language to complete a semester of overseas study (or a summer program if previously approved by the Department) in the relevant language, and strongly recommends a year-long course of study. As part of their study abroad experience, students must complete a study abroad portfolio to be turned in to the faculty advisor. Through exchanges coordinated by the Office of International Programs, Washington College offers many options for study abroad to majors and minors in this department. Students are expected to consult the faculty when planning their study abroad experience to insure that the program they choose meets the needs of their major and that they have a well-balanced course of study while abroad, including classes that complement their course of study on campus.

Majors must successfully complete the Senior Capstone Experience, which may consist of a comprehensive examination, a thesis or other project approved by the faculty advisor(s). The Senior Capstone Experience will be graded Pass, Fail or Honors and should be taken during the semester in which the student plans to graduate.

To improve fluency, enrich course work, and further their interest in the customs and cultures they are studying, language students are encouraged to speak the foreign language on a daily basis with the native French, German, and Spanish assistants who reside in the Language Suites. The language assistants are also available to students on a regular basis at informal coffee hours and other meetings of the foreign language clubs throughout the year. All interested students are invited to participate in the cultural activities sponsored by the language clubs, International House, and the department itself. There are opportunities for language-related internships as well. Interested students are urged to consult the chair or other department faculty.

The Department encourages students to enrich their knowledge of the foreign culture they are studying by taking related courses from other departments, and in some cases, these courses may be counted toward the major. We also recommend that our majors study two years of a second foreign language.

MINORS IN FRENCH STUDIES/GERMAN STUDIES/HISPANIC STUDIES

The Department also offers minors in French Studies, German Studies, and Hispanic Studies. Students who begin a language with 101, 102, or 201 must take a total of six classes in order to obtain the minor. Students who begin with 202 or above must take a total of five classes, at least one of which must be at the 400 level.

TEACHER TRAINING

Students planning to earn certification for secondary school teaching in a foreign language should consult with the Chair of the Department of Modern Languages and with the Chair of the Education Program during their first year or no later than their sophomore year.

French Studies

  • Elizabeth Gilbert-Filler
  • Katherine Maynard
  • Pamela Pears

101, 102. Elementary French

Designed for beginning students and aimed at developing skill in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French. Emphasis on communication through intensive aural/oral practice and awareness of cultural context. Three class meetings and one or two laboratory sessions per week at the discretion of the instructor.

201, 202. Intermediate French

Continued emphasis on the four basic skills. Intensive aural/oral practice. Review of grammar, expansion of vocabulary, and their application in writing. Development of effective reading strategies in response to both expository and literary texts. Familiarization of the student with French life and the francophone world. Three class meetings and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisite: French 102 (for 201) or French 201 (for 202), appropriate placement score, or permission of the instructor.

301, 302. Advanced French

A sequence designed to deepen the student’s skills reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Journalistic, cultural, and literary readings about contemporary French life serve to develop the student’s ability to analyze texts and to write clearly and persuasively in varied forms, such as the résumé, analysis, commentary, description, and short narrative. Class discussion aims at stimulating fluent and spontaneous use of spoken French. The course includes instruction in phonetics as a guide to correct pronunciation as well as multimedia cultural activities intended to improve the student’s linguistic and cultural knowledge. The course prepares the student for upper-level literature and civilization courses and for study abroad in a Francophone country. Prerequisite: FRS 202, appropriate placement score, or permission of the instructor. FRS 302 may be taken before FRS 301.

303, 304. Introduction to French and Francophone Literature and Culture

A course designed to help students answer the questions, “How does one talk and write about literature?” and “What does it mean to read and give a reading to a text?” An exploration of selected works representing different genres both in relation to other literary movements and their historical contexts. Prerequisite: French 301 or 302 or permission of the instructor.

311. Contemporary France

Taught in English, this course provides an introductory historical and cultural study of contemporary France. Students will be provided tools for cultural interpretation via critical texts and the analysis of French films and their American remakes; they will then apply them to the cultural history of France. We will explore the impact of World War II, of the student protests of May ‘68, and of women’s emancipation movements. We will examine Frances position in the world—its past as a colonizing nation, its present post-colonial actions, and its multicultural identity enriched by different waves of immigration. We will study the political and economic roles of women, their place in the family, health concerns, and struggles for autonomy through works by women. This course counts toward the French major and minor if the journal entries, mid-term exam, and final paper are written in French.

312. The Contemporary Francophone World

Taught in English, this course provides an introductory historical and cultural study of the contemporary Francophone world. Designed as a survey of the non-European Francophone world, the course will offer for study both literary and cultural documents from the Caribbean, North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Canada. Initially they will be provided tools for cultural interpretation via critical texts, media analysis (including print and internet sources) and the analysis of Francophone films; they will then apply them to the cultural history of the Francophone world. We will explore French colonization, the process of decolonization, and subsequent independence movements. We will examine social, political, and economic roles of both women and men, changing gender roles, and contemporary divisions of labor. Finally, we will reflect on the political, historical, and sociocultural situations of post-colonial Francophone nations.

411. Love In the Middle Ages

An investigation of the various modes of representation used to define love during the Middle Ages in France. Readings will include Ovid, Andreas Capellanus, the troubadours, Chrétien de Troyes, Marie de France, and the letters of Heloise and Abelard. Prerequisite: French 303, 304 or permission of the instructor.

412. The Renaissance in France

Reading and discussion of works exemplifying the literary achievement of sixteenth-century France and its relation to the spread of printing, voyages of exploration, the rise of Humanism, the Reformation, and the Wars of Religion. Readings include works by Marot, Rabelais, Scève, Louise Labé, du Bellay, Ronsard, Marguerite de Navarre, and Montaigne. Prerequisite: French 303, 304 or permission of the instructor.

413. The “Grand Siècle”

A study of representative works of the “grand siècle,” in which France achieved cultural ascendancy in Europe. Exploration of the development of classicism and its relation to the emergence of a centralized, autocratic régime. Readings will include dramatic works by Corneille, Racine, and Molière and selected non-dramatic writings: the poetry of La Fontaine, Madame de Lafayette’s La Princesse de Clèves,and selected writings of Descartes, Pascal, and La Bruyère. Prerequisite: French 303, 304 or permission of the instructor.

414. Les Lumières

A study of letters and the history of ideas from the Regency to the Revolution, with emphasis on the philosopher’s use of literature as a weapon to further their rationalistic, humanitarian ideas. The Pre-Romantic reaction to the Age of Reason as manifested in writing and painting. Readings include works by Prévost, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Beaumarchais, Bernardin de Saint-Pierre, and de Staël. Prerequisite: French 303, 304 or permission of the instructor.

415. Nineteenth-Century France: Romantics, Realists, Symbolists

An exploration of the nature of the different grands récits that shape this century and of how they relate to problems of colonialism, aestheticism, industrialization, class structures, feminism, publishing, and criticism. Examines as well the effects of the crise du roman. Prerequisite: French 303, 304 or permission of the instructor.

416. French and Francophone Poetry

An examination of major trends in French poetry from Romanticism to the present, this course is designed to increase the student’s awareness of and appreciation for poetry by close reading and explication in class of representative poems. Special attention will be paid to poetic forms and devices. Prerequisite: French 303, 304 or permission of the instructor.

417. Twentieth Century Evolutions and Revolutions: 1900-1945

Evolutions and revolutions in French literature in their necessary relation to other artistic, social, philosophical, and psychoanalytical developments, criticism, the impact of the two World Wars and the interwar period. Emphasis on narrative and genre. Readings will include works by Apollinaire, Barthes, Colette, Proust, Sartre, and Surrealist writers. Prerequisite: French 303, 304 or permission of the instructor.

418. Post-World War II France

What are the voices of the post-war period, feminism, and anticolonialism? What is the nature of identity and nationalism? What was the impact of the Algerian War and Mai 68? What is the nouveau roman? Who are some of the critics that have helped shape the visions of this century? Readings will be drawn from works by Beauvoir, Beckett, Césaire, Cixous, Duras, Fanon, Foucault, Ionesco, and Robbe-Grillet. Prerequisite: French 303, 304 or permission of the instructor.

419. Studies in Francophone Literature and Culture

This course will present the student with a number of aesthetic, cultural, historical, and political issues relevant to francophone literature. The particular national or regional focus will vary. Prerequisite: French 303, 304 or permission of the instructor.

451, 452. Senior Reading

The intensive study of an author or literary genre. Open to seniors; others by permission.

194, 294, 394, 494. Special Topics in French Studies

The intensive study of a selected author, movement, genre, or theme. Prerequisite: French 303, 304 or permission of the instructor for 394 and 494.

190, 290, 390, 490. Internship

195, 295, 395, 495. On-campus Research

196, 296, 396, 496. Off-campus Research

197, 297, 397, 497. Independent Study

SCE. Senior Capstone Experience in French Studies

The senior capstone is required for graduation and is devoted to the completion of a thesis or other project or to preparation for a comprehensive examination in the field of French Studies. Senior French Studies majors register for this course in the last semester in which they have full-time status at the College. While much of the work is done by each student independently in consultation with a faculty advisor, there are occasional group meetings in which those students writing theses or developing other projects report on the progress of their work and in which students preparing for the comprehensive examination discuss the texts and other materials they are studying. All students will give a formal oral presentation in the target language before their peers and the faculty at the end of the semester. Thesis students will present their research. Students who are taking the comprehensive examination will choose a topic for their presentation in consultation with the faculty advisor. The Senior Capstone Experience will be graded Pass, Fail or Honors.

German Studies

  • Nicole Grewling
  • James Martin

101, 102. Elementary German

Designed to develop basic proficiency in aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Authentic cultural materials (videos, slides, and cassettes) and computer-aided instruction enrich the student’s knowledge and understanding of German-speaking countries. A native German-speaking assistant serves as tutor for the course. Three class meetings and one or two laboratory sessions per week at the discretion of the instructor.

201, 202. Intermediate German

Review and intensified practice of language skills. German literary texts, newspapers, magazines, and television shows provide the basis for discussion of a wide range of contemporary social, political, and cultural topics. Class projects allow students to explore issues of their particular interest. A native German-speaking assistant serves as tutor for the course. Three class meetings and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisite: German 102 (for 201), German 201 (for 202), appropriate placement score, or permission of the instructor.

301, 302. Advanced German Proficiency

Students enhance their language skills and build their vocabulary through instructional units involving contemporary texts and literature. Topics include: “The Modernization of the Märchen, ” “German Perception of America through American Film, ” “Contemporary Short Stories by Women, ” ” Der kleine Vampir, a Children’s Book. ” Texts and assignments are chosen to fit the particular needs, interests and proficiency level of students. Multi-media classroom instruction includes use of video, cds and the Internet. Prerequisite: German 202 or permission of the instructor. German 302 may be taken before German 301.

304. German Civilization

A survey of German history, politics, and art from their beginnings to the present with special emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In addition, this course will focus on a close study of the geography and social structures of German-speaking countries. Use will be made of authentic sources. Students will continue to develop language skills, especially reading strategies and vocabulary building. Prerequisite: German 202 or permission of the instructor.

305. Introduction to German Literature

This course provides students with the analytic tools that will facilitate the reading and interpretation of German literature. Specific artistic accomplishments are discussed against the background of historical and social contexts. Brief selections reach from the writings of Martin Luther to works by contemporary women. Particular emphasis will be placed on authors of the twentieth century. Students will continue to develop language skills, especially reading strategies and vocabulary building. Prerequisite: German 202 or permission of the instructor.

411. The Classical Age

Largely prevented from taking an active political role in the society of their day, late eighteenth-century German authors and intellectuals began what amounted to an artistic revolution—a revolution in thought and expression whose effects are still felt today. Focusing on key works by Kant, Goethe, Schiller, Mozart, Beethoven, and others, this course explores and critiques central concerns of the German Classical Age (e.g., enlightenment, tolerance, harmony, human perfectibility, progress, etc.)

412. Romantic Germany

Set against the backdrop of French/European revolution, German Romantic thought manifested two distinct but related modes. On the one hand, many romantics broke with traditional commonplaces about art, nature, and humanity, embracing forms of philosophical idealism, pantheism, and “Romantic Irony. ” On the other hand, however, a number of artists and intellectuals also longed for a return to the past—to an “organic” society in which divisive religious and political conflicts were as yet unknown. The course examines these and related trends as manifested in the literature, philosophy, painting, and music of the era.

413. The Birth of Modern Germany

In many respects, modern German history may be said to have begun with the failed bourgeois revolution of 1848. With the shattering of its democratic hopes, the German middle class largely turned away from political concerns, focusing instead on the pleasures of family life, the private accumulation of wealth, and the advancement of science and industry. At the same time, the German bourgeoisie also came to accept the autocratic state authority with which it would ever afterwards be associated. This course traces the often ambivalent artistic responses to German “modernity, ” focusing on figures such as Fontane, Hauptmann, Nietzsche, Wagner, and Rilke, and the movements with which they are associated (Realism, Naturalism, Symbolism, and Expressionism.)

417. Democratic and Totalitarian Germany

Few eras continue to fascinate as do those of Germany’s Weimar Republic (1918-1933) and Third Reich (1933-1945). In the former, we find a fragile new democracy characterized at once by anxiety, inflation, and the destruction of values, as well as an explosion of creative energies in literature, film, music, the visual arts, and architecture. In the latter, by contrast, Germany’s “Golden Twenties” come crashing to a halt; post-war anxieties, uncertainties, and freedoms are exchanged for the reactionary nationalism of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party. Drawing on key cultural artifacts from the periods in question, this course considers the troubled relationship between democracy and totalitarianism in German history. The course then concludes with an analysis of the divided Germany as it developed after 1945.

418. The Culture of the Open Society

With the construction of the Berlin Wall in 1961, Germany’s permanent separation seemed assured. In the east, the German Democratic Republic sought to realize a socialist state founded upon the principles of Marxism-Leninism. In the west, the Federal Republic of Germany embraced the model of a capitalist and politically “open” (pluralistic) society. This seminar focuses on the trials and triumphs of the latter, tracing social, cultural, and political developments from 1961 to the present. Topics of discussion will include Germany’s “economic miracle” and “affluent society, ” the social market economy, student, peace, and women’s movements, terrorism, and German Reunification.

194, 294, 394, 494. Special Topics in German Studies

The intensive study of a selected author, movement, genre, or theme in German culture studies.

190, 290, 390, 490. Internship

195, 295, 395, 495. On-campus Research

196, 296, 396, 496. Off-campus Research

197, 297, 397, 497. Independent Study

SCE. Senior Capstone Experience in German Studies

The senior capstone is required for graduation and is devoted to the completion of a thesis or other project or to preparation for a comprehensive examination in the field of German Studies. Senior German Studies majors register for this course in the last semester in which they have full-time status at the College. While much of the work is done by each student independently in consultation with a faculty advisor, there are occasional group meetings in which those students writing theses or developing other projects report on the progress of their work and in which students preparing for the comprehensive examination discuss the texts and other materials they are studying. All students will give a formal oral presentation in the target language before their peers and the faculty at the end of the semester. Thesis students will present their research. Students who are taking the comprehensive examination will choose a topic for their presentation in consultation with the faculty advisor. The Senior Capstone Experience will be graded Pass, Fail or Honors.

After consultation with the faculty in the German Program, students can take up to two 300- or 400-level courses from outside the German Program for credit toward a major, one such course toward a minor, in German studies if these courses contain substantial work done in German under the supervision of the German faculty. The following courses are recommended. This list is not exclusive.

  • ART 315. Northern Renaissance and Baroque Art
  • ECN 410. International Economics
  • HIS 354. Renaissance and Reformation
  • HIS 360. Twentieth Century Germany
  • HIS 362. Europe Since 1945
  • MUS 308. Classic Music
  • MUS 312. Romantic Music
  • PHL 414. The Philosophy of Marxism
  • POL 315. Comparative Government Western Europe

Hispanic Studies

  • Collin Ashmore
  • Cristina Casado Presa (on leave, Fall)
  • Elena Deanda Camacho (on leave, Fall)
  • Shawn Stein
  • Kaitlin Thomas

101, 102. Elementary Spanish

Designed to develop basic proficiency in aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. A native Spanish-speaking assistant serves as tutor for the course. Three class meetings and one or two laboratory sessions per week at the discretion of the instructor.

200. Review of Introductory Spanish

A review of the material covered in HPS 101 and HPS 102 for those who need a refresher in the basics but have enough experience to progress to more advanced language production. The objective of this course is to expand basic proficiency in the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing, as well as to help students interact with various elements of the culture from different Spanish speaking countries. HPS 200 is only appropriate for those with no prior Spanish experience at the university level who have had a minimum of 2 years and a maximum of 3 years at the high school level. Students who have completed HPS 101, HPS 102, or HPS 201 may not take this course. Three class meetings and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score, or permission of the instructor.

201, 202. Intermediate Spanish

Review and intensified practice of language skills. Readings cover a wide range of topics in Spanish and Spanish American culture and literature. A native Spanish-speaking assistant serves as tutor for the course. Three class meetings and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisite: HPS 102, 200, appropriate placement score, or permission of the instructor for HPS 201; HPS 201, appropriate placement score, or permission of the instructor for HPS 202.

301. Advanced Spanish Proficiency I

A course designed to improve reading and writing skills and to augment vocabulary through the use of literary and cultural texts, including film. Spanish grammar is thoroughly reviewed with emphasis on those elements of the structure of Spanish that are often the most troubling to non-native learners. Prerequisite: HPS 202, appropriate placement score, or permission of the instructor.

302. Advanced Spanish Proficiency II

This course is designed especially to improve speaking and listening comprehension skills, again through the use of cultural and literary materials, including film. Emphasis will continue to be placed on vocabulary building and the review of Spanish grammar. Prerequisite: HPS 202, appropriate placement score, or the permission of the Instructor. HPS 302 may be taken before HPS 301.

303. Introduction to the Literature and Culture of Latin America

An introduction to the literature of Latin America. This course provides students with the analytic tools that will facilitate the reading and interpretation of the literature of various Latin American countries and their representative authors. The course includes works of poetry, drama, short story, novel and film. Prerequisite: HPS 301 or 302 or permission of the instructor.

304. Introduction to the Literature and Culture of Spain

An introduction to Spanish literature. This course provides students with the analytic tools that will facilitate the reading and interpretation of the literature of Spain and its representative authors. The course includes works of poetry, drama, short story, novel, and film. Prerequisite: HPS 301 or 302 or permission of the instructor.

305. Introduction to the Literature of Spain and Latin America

An introduction to Spanish and Latin American literature. This course provides students with the analytic tools that will facilitate the reading and interpretation of the literature of Spain and Latin America and their representative authors. The course includes poetry, drama, short story, novel, and essay. This class combines key texts from HPS 303 and 304 and prepares HPS majors for the Senior Capstone Experience. Prerequisite: HPS 301or 302 or permission of the instructor.

307. Spanish for International Business

Designed to give students a foundation in the vocabulary of business and international trade and in the expression of basic business concepts in Spanish. Practice in presenting oral reports on business and cultural topics, in reading business reports and other texts of a cultural nature, and in writing various kinds of business correspondence, including résumés, memos, and letters. All materials are presented within a cultural context intended to expand the students’ knowledge and understanding of the manners and mores of Spain and the Spanish-speaking republics of Latin America, as well as of demographic, geographic, and other data related to those nations. Prerequisite: HPS 301 or 302 or permission of the instructor.

194, 294, 394, 494. Special Topics in Hispanic Studies

The intensive study of a selected author, movement, genre, or theme in literature or film or a study of the culture of a particular period, region, or nation. Prerequisite: HPS 303, 304 or 305, or permission of the instructor.

401. The Civilization of Spain

The course begins with a look at the geography of Spain, followed by a study of the early cultures that contributed to the formation of Spanish character and civilization. It continues with the study of the evolution of Spain’s civilization from the Middle Ages up to the present time. A major emphasis is on contemporary Spanish society, its institutions and forms of cultural expression. Prerequisite: HPS 303, 304 or 305, or permission of the instructor.

402. The Civilization of Spanish America

The course begins with consideration of the geography of the Spanish-speaking republics from Mexico through Central and South America and the Caribbean. It moves then to the study of the major pre-contact indigenous cultures (the Mayas, the Aztecs, and the Incas), continuing with the Spanish conquest and a study of colonial society and culture. It then moves to the struggle for independence from Spain and cultural developments in the 19th and 20th centuries. A major emphasis of the course is on general characteristics of Spanish American society, its institutions and forms of cultural expression in the contemporary period. Prerequisite: HPS 303, 304 or 305, or permission of the instructor.

410. History of Spanish

A study of the evolution (phonological, morphological, semantic and syntactic of spoken Latin into Castilian through the reading and analysis of medieval texts. The class will also consider the major historical events (social and political that contributed to the formation of modern Spanish. Prerequisite: HPS 301 or 302, or permission of the instructor.

415. Studies in Early Modern Spanish Literature

Spanning the medieval era to the XVIII century, this course focuses on selective works of history, essay, poetry, prose, and theatre that are representative of literary periods such as Medieval, Golden Age, Baroque, and/or the Enlightenment. This class emphasizes close reading as well as contextual analysis, considering the major historical, social and political events that contributed to each period formation.

Prerequisite: HPS 303, 304 or 305, or permission of the instructor.

416. Studies in Colonial Latin American Literature

Spanning the pre-hispanic era to the XVIII century, this course focuses on selective works of history, essay, poetry, prose, and theatre that are representative of periods like Pre-Hispanic literature, Colonial Baroque, and/or the Enlightenment. This class emphasizes close reading as well as contextual analysis, considering the major historical, social and political events that contributed to each period formation.

Prerequisite: HPS 303, 304 or 305, or permission of the instructor.

418. Narratives of Mexico

An examination of modern Mexican society through representative works of cultural production, this course aims to enhance students’ understanding of Mexican literature, film, art, history and politics, by focusing on critical analysis of narrative forms that derive from a wide range of aesthetic and ideological approaches, including the idea of Mexico, imagined communities, national consciousness, representations of stereotypes, border culture and migration, democracy, human rights, justice (environmental and social), the Mexican Revolution, free trade, the Zapatista Rebellion, and violence (gender-based and narco). Successful completion of this course will enhance proficiency in technical vocabulary for writing and speaking about cultural analysis. Prerequisite: HPS 303, 304 or 305, or permission of the instructor.

419. Weapons, Words, Images: Perspectives on the Spanish Civil War

Few events on the 20th century have ignited the imagination, caused ideological discussions, inspired historical studies and shaken more passions inside and outside Spain than the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939). This course analyzes this conflict in depth and shows how the Civil War has been and continues to be the center of an extraordinary cultural energy and a center of reflection in popular culture, art, literature, politics and the society of Spain today. Prerequisite: HPS 303, 304 or 305, or permission of the instructor.

420. I Am No Angel: Post-Franco Literature Written by Women

Literary representations throughout the centuries reflect the belief that the aspirations of the Spanish woman must be subordinated to the roles of mother, saint, virgin…the prudente. This course explores representative literary works written by women after General Franco’s death. In this moment of political change, a significant tendency is the emergent depiction of female characters that show a clear self-consciousness and express fully their thoughts, emotions and desires. Throughout the course we will examine poems, short stories and plays that allow us to consider the possibility of the production of new ideologies at a moment in which new models of “la mujer española” coexist and come into conflict with the old ones. Prerequisite: HPS 303, 304 or 305, or permission of the instructor.

190, 290, 390, 490. Internship

195, 295, 395, 495. On-campus Research

196, 296, 396, 496. Off-campus Research

197, 297, 397, 497. Independent Study

SCE. Senior Capstone Experience in Hispanic Studies

The senior capstone is required for graduation and is devoted to the completion of a thesis or other project or to preparation for a comprehensive examination in the field of Hispanic Studies. Senior Hispanic Studies majors register for this course in the last semester in which they have full-time status at the College. While much of the work is done by each student independently in consultation with a faculty advisor, there are occasional group meetings in which those students writing theses or developing other projects report on the progress of their work and in which students preparing for the comprehensive examination discuss the texts and other materials they are studying. All students will give a formal oral presentation in the target language before their peers and the faculty at the end of the semester. Thesis students will present their research. Students who are taking the comprehensive examination will choose a topic for their presentation in consultation with the faculty advisor. The Senior Capstone Experience will be graded Pass, Fail or Honors.

Other Courses

FLS 101, 102. Elementary Language Study (Tutorial)

Students may enroll in this course to study a language that is not part of the regular curriculum of the Department of Modern Languages. Permission to study the language under this independent study/tutorial arrangement depends upon the availability of an appropriate tutor for the language requested. Students who study a language in this program are strongly urged to follow up such study by participating in at least one semester of study abroad in a country where the language is spoken. Permission of department chair required with the exception of the Elementary Latin class (FLS 101, 102)

FLS 200. Introduction to Language

This course will introduce the student to the study of linguistics. Concepts of both historical and descriptive linguistics are included. Some of the areas of study are: linguistic history and methodology, language origin, language and society, language structure, dialects and language families. The course is open to all students. Not currently offered.

FLS 194, 294, 394, 494. Special Topics in Foreign Language Studies

FLS 400. Romance Linguistics

A comparative overview of the Romance language family. Topics include the evolution, variation, and structural characteristics of these languages. Also considered are the sociopolitical factors favoring the linguistic autonomy accorded to some languages but not to others. Taught in English. Prerequisites: 300-level HPS or FRS, Italian 201 or permission of the instructor. Not currently offered.

FLS 490. Foreign Language Internship

Designed to provide students with pre-professional experience in fields in which their language proficiency is an essential asset. The specific internship experiences will vary. They include placement of Hispanic Studies students with public health and social service agencies, as well as in the local school systems as instructional aids with ESOL students. Interested students should consult the department chair.

ARA 101,102. Elementary Arabic I and II

An introduction to Arabic, this course offers an integrated approach to basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The class meets three days per week, and class work is supplemented by one or two weekly laboratory sessions, at the discretion of the instructor. The course is accompanied by a continuous video narrative which is presented as the basic text and the context for each new grammatical concept as it is introduced. Not currently offered.

CHN 101, 102. Elementary Chinese

An introduction to Mandarin Chinese, this course offers an integrated approach to basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Class work is supplemented by laboratory periods which include practice with language tapes and video tapes. Discussion of a graded series of cultural topics promotes students understanding of Chinese life and society and aids language learning. Three class meetings and one or two laboratory sessions per week at the discretion of the instructor. Not currently offered.

CHN 201, 202. Intermediate Chinese

This course will review and build upon language skills acquired in the introductory course to Mandarin Chinese. It offers an integrated approach to basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The class will meet three days per week, plus a laboratory period. The laboratory includes practice with audio- and videotapes. Graded readings on topics related to Chinese life and society serve as an aid to language learning and provide an introduction to Chinese culture. Prerequisite: Chinese 102 or the equivalent. Not currently offered.

ITA 101, 102. Elementary Italian

Designed for beginning students and aimed at developing skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing Italian. Emphasis on communication through intensive aural/oral practice, basic composition, and awareness of cultural context. Three class meetings and one or two laboratory sessions per week at the discretion of the instructor. Not currently offered.

ITA 201, 202. Intermediate Italian

Continued emphasis on the four basic skills. Intensive aural/oral practice. Review and continued study of grammar, expansion of vocabulary, and their application to writing. Readings devoted to a wide range of topics in Italian culture. Class discussion of contemporary issues and cultural topics. Class meets three days per week with one additional laboratory session. Not currently offered.

JPN 101, 102. Elementary Japanese

The course aims at the acquisition of communicative competence in the four basic language skills—listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing in contemporary Japanese. The emphasis is on thorough mastery of the basic structures of Japanese through student-centered, aural-oral exercises and practice, and on an introduction to Japanese culture. Three class meetings per week, plus one or two drill sessions at the discretion of the instructor.

JPN 201, 202. Intermediate Japanese

The course aims at further development in communicative competence in the four basic language skills—listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing in contemporary Japanese. The emphasis is again on thorough mastery of basic structures of Japanese through student-centered aural-oral exercises. Continued practice in reading and writing Japanese in a cultural context. Three class meetings per week, plus one or two drill sessions at the discretion of the instructor.

POR 101, 102. Elementary Portuguese

Designed for beginning students and aimed at developing skill in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing Brazilian Portuguese. Emphasis on communication through intensive aural/oral practice, basic composition, and awareness of cultural context. Three class meetings and one or two laboratory sessions per week at the discretion of the instructor. Not currently offered.