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Courses and Descriptions

Past Courses & Distribution 

Qualtrics form for Spring 2022 literary events for CRW and JEP minors

 

Courses that Count for the W2 Requirement in Fall 2023

ENG 101: Literature and Composition.  This course develops the student’s capacity for intelligent reading, critical analysis, and writing through the study of literature. There are frequent writing assignments, as well as individual conferences on the student’s writing.  Counts for Humanities distribution, JEP gateway course, and W2 requirement.
  • Meehan, MWF  8:30-9:20am
  • Rydel, MWF 11:30-12:30pm
ENG 103: Introduction to Creative Writing.  A workshop introducing new writers to several forms of creative writing, including poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Students will use classic and contemporary literature as models for their own efforts.  Counts for Creative Writing minor, Journalism, Editing & Publishing minor, W2 requirement, and Humanities requirement for students matriculating Fall 2023.
  • Taliancich, MW 2:30-3:45pm
  • Kesey, TTH 2:30-3:45pm

CMS/ENG 224-10: Intro to Journalism.  This course will cover the foundations of reporting, writing, fact checking, and editing. Other topics such as the history and ethics of journalism will be discussed. Counts for Humanities, intro for English major, JEP gateway, and W2 requirement.

  • O'Connor, TTh 10:00am-11:15am

Distribution Credit In English

Students can fullfill the Humanities Distribution requirement with ANY 100-level or 200-level course in English except ENG 103: Intro to Creative Writing.

Courses that Count for the Humanities Requirement in Fall 2023

Counts for Humanities distribution and W2 requirement.

ENG 101: Literature and Composition.  This course develops the student’s capacity for intelligent reading, critical analysis, and writing through the study of literature. There are frequent writing assignments, as well as individual conferences on the student’s writing.

  • Meehan, MWF  8:30-9:20am
  • Rydel, MWF 11:30-12:30pm

ENG 103: Introduction to Creative Writing.  A workshop introducing new writers to several forms of creative writing, including poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Students will use classic and contemporary literature as models for their own efforts.  Counts for Creative Writing minor, Journalism, Editing & Publishing minor, W2 requirement, and Humanities requirement for students matriculating Fall 2023.

  • Taliancich, MW 2:30-3:45pm
  • Kesey, TTH 2:30-3:45pm

ENG 207: British Literature and Culture.  This course offers a survey of literature written in English between 700 and 1688, a timeframe that spans the evolution of Old, Middle, and Early Modern Englishes.  Our reading focuses on major texts and authors, ranging from Caedmon and Chaucer to Margery Kempe and Shakespeare, and analyzes them in the context of their historical moment and aesthetic movements.  Counts for Humanities distribution and the Medieval and Early Modern Studies Minor.  

  • Charles, MWF 1:30-2:20pm

AMS/ENG 209.  Intro to American Literature and Culture I. Taught in the fall semester, the course is concerned with the establishment of American Literature as a school subject.  Texts that have achieved the status of "classics" of American Literature, such as Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, Thoreau's Walden, and Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, will be read in the context of the history and politics of their achieving this status.  Texts traditionally excluded from the canon of American literature, in particular early Hispano- and Franco-American texts, will be considered in the context of their relative marginality to the project of establishing American Literature in the American academy.  Other-than-written materials, such as modern cinematic representations of the period of exploration and colonization of North America, as well as British colonial portraits and history paintings, will be studied for how they reflect on claims for the cultural independence of early North America.  Other-than-North-American materials, such as late medieval and early Renaissance Flemish and French still lifes, as well as the works of nineteenth-century European romantic poets and prose writers, will be sampled for how they reflect on claims for the exceptional character of North American culture. Counts for American Studies major and Humanities distribution.

  • DeProspo, TuTh 11:30am-12:45pm

AMS/ ENG 213-10: African American Literature and Culture I. This course is a survey of African American literature produced from the late 1700s to the Harlem Renaissance. It is designed to introduce students to the writers, texts, themes, conventions and tropes that have shaped the African American literary tradition. Authors studied in this course include Phillis Wheatley, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, William Wells Brown, Frances E. W. Harper, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Nella Larsen and Langston Hughes. There are no prerequisites for this course; however, students are encouraged to take HIS 319 "African American History to 1865" as a co-requisite.This course is a survey of African American literature produced from the late 1700s to the Harlem Renaissance. It is designed to introduce students to the writers, texts, themes, conventions and tropes that have shaped the African American literary tradition. Authors studied in this course include Phillis Wheatley, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, William Wells Brown, Frances E. W. Harper, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Nella Larsen and Langston Hughes. There are no prerequisites for this course; however, students are encouraged to take HIS 319 "African American History to 1865" as a co-requisite.  This class counts for Humanities distribution, and the English major intro course, as well as the American Studies major.

  • Staff, MWF 11:30-12:20pm

ENG 220-11: Intro to Fiction.  This course introduces you to the study of literary fiction. This is not a creative writing workshop nor an introduction to fiction writing methods. This course will survey the rich tradition of prose fiction largely, but not exclusively, in English. Emphasis will be placed on the enduring features of this genre as it evolved throughout the centuries as well as to the innovations introduced by individual writers. The literary works selected for this course will draw upon a variety of fictional forms and styles. Class discussions will include, along with close readings of the works themselves, an appreciation of the historical and cultural contexts out of which they arose and to which they gave a fictional rewriting. Counts for Creative Writing minor, Humanities distribution, and W2 requirement.

  • Staff, MWF 9:30-10:20am

CMS/ENG 224-10. This course will cover the foundations of reporting, writing, fact checking, and editing. Other topics such as the history and ethics of journalism will be discussed. Counts for Humanities, intro for English major, JEP gateway, and W2 requirement.

  • O'Connor, TTh 10:00am-11:15am

 

Fall 2023 Upper Level Courses in English, Creative Writing, Journalism, Editing & Publishing

GEN/ENG 302-10: Arthurian Literature. This class will examine the development of stories about King Arthur and his court in the medieval literary tradition, as well as consider the tradition of Arthuriana that continues in present day popular adaptations. We will ask why these stories resonate so strongly with audiences from the Middle Ages up to today and consider the ideas and social problems they explore. Literary criticism and scholarly research will inform student presentations and essays. Counts for Pre-1800 English major, European Studies minor, Gender Studies minor, and Medieval and Early Modern Studies minor.

  • Rydel, MWF 12:30-1:20pm

GEN/ENG 323-10: The Nineteenth Century Novel: Horror, at Home and Abroad. Major writers such as Jane Austen, Emily Bronte, Charlotte Bronte, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, and Thomas Hardy will be studied. Attention will be given to the cultural and literary context of the novels. Counts for Post 1800 English najors. 

  • Charles, MWF 11:30am-12:20pm

ENG 345-10: The African American Novel. This course examines the origin and development of the African American novel. We will begin with the earliest novels and conclude with an analysis of contemporary novels by African American writers. We will examine novels from multiple genres and give careful attention to the intersection of race, gender, class and environment in representative novels of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. Counts for Post 1800 for English majors.

  • Staff, MWF 1:20-2:45pm

ENG/ENV347-10: American Environmental Writing. The study of writing from an enviromental perspective is both an emerging field in literary criticism and a rich tradition in American literary history. What does it mean to be green from a literary point of view? This course explores that question in looking at classic and contemporary authors of American environmental writing, from Henry David Thoreau to Annie Dillard to recent examples of eco-criticism. Though the primary focus will be on nonfiction prose, the traditional home of nature writing, the course will also explore enviromental perspectives in poetry, fiction, and film as well as cross-disciplinary connections with the natural sciences and social sciences. Counts for Post 1800 for English majors, and Education majors.

  • Meehan, MWF 9:30-10:20am

AMS 400/ENG 371-10: Faulkner and Literary Modernism. The course will concentrate on the novels of Faulkner as exemplifying modernism. Counts for American Studies and Post 1800 for English majors.

  • DeProspo, W 4:00-6:30pm

ENG 400-10: Junior Seminar. 

 
Junior Seminar fulfills the English department's W3 (Writing in the Discipline) writing program requirement. In this course you will focus your attention on the "methods and modes of writing and critical thinking" specific to literary studies. While our main question will be, in effect, "what does literary study look like today?" we will break that question down into its potentially infinite subsets, including questions surrounding what literary study should look like, what literary critics can do with texts, what texts do to literary critics, and how we can conceive of criticism as both a vocation and as a transferable skill. This course builds on the knowledge and skills you learned in your W1 and W2 courses, and it will help you transition to the work you will need to complete for the W4 requirement (i.e., the Senior Capstone Experience). You will practice developing research questions and assessing the applicability and relevance of different research methods, thus providing a foundation for developing compelling SCE projects, which you will be undertaking in the final year of your studies as an English major. In addition, we have aligned the Junior Seminar with Sophie Kerr programming in the fall, inviting scholars and writers to visit campus and join the class. Mandatory for English majors in the Fall of their junior year.
 
  • O'Connor, TTH 1:00-2:15pm

ENG 453-10: Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry. Primarily intended for juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: Introduction to Creative Writing. Counts for Creative Writing minor, and English major/minor.

  • Hall, TH 2:30-5:00pm

AMS/CMS/ENG 460-10: Book History. This course surveys the interdisciplinary field of book history, with an emphasis on American print culture from the nineteenth century to the present. Students will explore topics related to the creation, publication, dissemination and reception of American print communication (e.g., books, periodicals, and newspapers). Students will also learn and practice advanced research methods used by literary historians and print culture scholars. Counts for Post 1800 for English majors, and JEP upper level.

  • Knight, TuTh 10:00-11:15am.

 

Want to see more about exciting classes we regularly teach?

Take a look at the Washington College course catalog for full course descriptions.

Course Catalog