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Brandon Smith

Class of 2010

With a business-like attitude and taste for variety, Brandon Smith ‘10 found the perfect balance of liberal arts at Washington College.

Brandon would like to own his own business someday. It’s a lofty goal, but the young entrepreneur has already taken the first step. For more than six years, he has run a lawn-care and odd jobs business, called Bee’s Jobs. With clients located from West Chester to Philadelphia, Brandon has been able to live off this job alone in the summertime.

This year, however, Brandon is moving up the corporate ladder. He has an internship at Enterprise Rent-A-Car, where he learns about the business itself and gains some management training. “The idea with Enterprise is ‘we’ll pick you up.’ So I meet a lot of people who have something to say, or who ask about me. I’ve made a lot of contacts that way.”

At WC, Brandon is a member of SIFE (Students In Free Enterprise). This student-run business organization teaches students and community members the aspects of good business and regularly hosts information sessions on topics such as investment or credit-building. They also run the annual Career Fair, a major campus event.

In 2008, Brandon was a part of the SIFE team that won the Philadelphia Regional Competition, thus sending WC to the National Finals. The team was graded on the extent of their impact at Washington College, as well as their presentation for the judges.

Despite his dedication to the business field, Brandon wants to avoid getting caught in an all-business rut. “I didn’t want to just take business classes. After awhile, that gets old. I wanted a broader education.”

The goal of a liberal arts education is to be able to examine any issue from multiple perspectives, be they literary, scientific or economic. So Brandon applied to Washington College, a place that appealed to him because of the “the wide variety of classes, plus the proximity to the river and Chesapeake Bay.” He appreciates the size of the school as well. “You can actually talk to your professors when you have a problem. They will have graded your quizzes, tests and papers, so they know exactly where you’re coming from.”

He adds, “For such a small school, WC is really offering a lot to its students, especially with all the new buildings.” The College opened two new residence halls in 2008; the Gibson Center for the Arts and the Hodson Hall dining facility and student center opened in fall 2009.

Brandon’s traveling experience truly reflects his liberal arts mindset. Last year, he participated in the College’s summer program in Tanzania, where a dozen students learned about African culture: “Their way of life is totally different from ours. We saw what they do to survive on much less than we have.

“Plus it’s something most people never see for themselves. When else are you able to go to Africa like that? It was fun and an educational experience all wrapped into one.”

As a member of the equestrian team, Brandon faces the unknown on a regular basis. The schools that host the competition must supply every rider with a horse, so everyone is on equally unfamiliar ground—and saddle. “You just get on and ride,” Brandon says. “You don’t know much about the horse, yet you’re judged on how well you make it perform. It’s a challenge.”

But with his experiences in business, competition and travel, Brandon is living up to the challenge again and again

Broad-Thinking & Business-Minded

With a business-like attitude and taste for variety, Brandon Smith ‘10 found the perfect balance of liberal arts at Washington College.

Brandon would like to own his own business someday. It’s a lofty goal, but the young entrepreneur has already taken the first step. For more than six years, he has run a lawn-care and odd jobs business, called Bee’s Jobs. With clients located from West Chester to Philadelphia, Brandon has been able to live off this job alone in the summertime.

This year, however, Brandon is moving up the corporate ladder. He has an internship at Enterprise Rent-A-Car, where he learns about the business itself and gains some management training. “The idea with Enterprise is ‘we’ll pick you up.’ So I meet a lot of people who have something to say, or who ask about me. I’ve made a lot of contacts that way.”

At WC, Brandon is a member of SIFE (Students In Free Enterprise). This student-run business organization teaches students and community members the aspects of good business and regularly hosts information sessions on topics such as investment or credit-building. They also run the annual Career Fair, a major campus event.

In 2008, Brandon was a part of the SIFE team that won the Philadelphia Regional Competition, thus sending WC to the National Finals. The team was graded on the extent of their impact at Washington College, as well as their presentation for the judges.

Despite his dedication to the business field, Brandon wants to avoid getting caught in an all-business rut. “I didn’t want to just take business classes. After awhile, that gets old. I wanted a broader education.”

The goal of a liberal arts education is to be able to examine any issue from multiple perspectives, be they literary, scientific or economic. So Brandon applied to Washington College, a place that appealed to him because of the “the wide variety of classes, plus the proximity to the river and Chesapeake Bay.” He appreciates the size of the school as well. “You can actually talk to your professors when you have a problem. They will have graded your quizzes, tests and papers, so they know exactly where you’re coming from.”

He adds, “For such a small school, WC is really offering a lot to its students, especially with all the new buildings.” The College opened two new residence halls in 2008; the Gibson Center for the Arts and the Hodson Hall dining facility and student center opened in fall 2009.

Brandon’s traveling experience truly reflects his liberal arts mindset. Last year, he participated in the College’s summer program in Tanzania, where a dozen students learned about African culture: “Their way of life is totally different from ours. We saw what they do to survive on much less than we have.

“Plus it’s something most people never see for themselves. When else are you able to go to Africa like that? It was fun and an educational experience all wrapped into one.”

As a member of the equestrian team, Brandon faces the unknown on a regular basis. The schools that host the competition must supply every rider with a horse, so everyone is on equally unfamiliar ground—and saddle. “You just get on and ride,” Brandon says. “You don’t know much about the horse, yet you’re judged on how well you make it perform. It’s a challenge.”

But with his experiences in business, competition and travel, Brandon is living up to the challenge again and again.