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Kiplin Hall

Haworth Village - Yorkshire

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    Haworth Village, Yorkshire. http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2010/07/04/article-1291910-0A2EA2B8000005DC-900_634x432.jpg
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    Haworth!
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Location: Haworth Village, Yorkshire

June 17, 2014

Haworth is a quaint, historical village located in the heart of West Yorshire’s Bronte Country. The village, which rests above the Worth Valley within the Pennine Moors, is globally recognized for its connections to the Bronte Sisters. 

Background Information on Haworth:

 

  • The earliest documentation of Haworth dates back to 1209, when it was first recorded as a settlement. Haworth was, at first, often misspelt on maps and other forms of documentation. The spelling varied from Howorth to Howarth even as late at 1771. The village itself is located on the eastern slope of the Pennines, close to the River Worth. The Pennines are a series of mountain ranges and hills that separate North West England from Yorkshire and North East England. 

 

  • Situated roughly 800 feet above sea level, Haworth is 200 miles north of London and just about 40 miles west of York. Tourism accounts for much of the local economy, with major landmarks including the Bronte Parsonage Museum and the Heritage Railway. In her book, “The Life of Charlotte Bronte,” author Elizabeth Gaskell describes the appearance of the small village in saying, “the old stone houses are high compared with the width of the street, which makes an abrupt turn before reaching the more level ground at the head of the village, so that the steep aspect of the place in one part is almost like that of a wall.” In the picture to your right, you can see the accuracy behind Gaskell’s words. The streets, shops and homes are all made of stone. 

 

Literary History:

 

  • The village of Haworth is most noted for its associations to the Bronte Sisters. Though the sisters were born in Thornton, they wrote the most famous of their works while residing in the Haworth Parsonage. Their father, a parson at the Church of St. Michael and All Angels, moved his three daughters to Haworth on April 20, 1820. Emily, Charlotte and Anne, though outlived by their father, wrote such works as Wuthering Heights, Jane Eyre and Agnes Grey during their time in Haworth. The village and its surrounding moors are believed to be the inspiration behind the sister’s fictional settings. Specifically, the ruined farmhouse on Top Withens is considered by most to be the vision behind Heathcliff’s dwelling in Wuthering Heights.

 

  • In addition to their literary endeavors, the Bronte sisters are also noted for attempting to improve the education system within Haworth. Charlotte, for example, worked to fund and create a school for the local children. Though the school itself never came to be, Charlotte’s effort was the catalyst behind later educational reforms within the town.  


Other Notable Landmarks: 

 

  • In addition to the moorlands and Bronte Parsonage Museum, Haworth is also noted for the Keighley and Worth Valley Railway, which connects Haworth to Keighley (a town roughly five miles south of Haworth). This railway is an authentically preserved steam railway system. 


Interesting Facts: 

  • While the Kiplin Hall group is visiting Haworth, the town will be hosting its annual Arts Festival! The art festival includes comedic shows, live concerts and vocal performances by local artists.

 

  • On July 6th, the Tour de France will pass through Haworth!  

 

Impressions of Haworth! (Pronounced: Haaaaaaaworth): 

- I found Haworth to be an absolutely stunning and picturesque town. My favorite part of touring this city was the he church of St. Michaels and All Angels, which sat atop the summit of the craggily, stone street that wove through the center of town. The Bronte Parsonage Museum was also an incredible sight to see, I found this exhibit to be the most interactive and thought-provoking of all the ones we visited. The best room in the parsonage was the front sitting room, located to the right as soon as you walked in. I loved that the sister’s writing utensils and desks had been saved. It might have just been me, but I felt the presence of Emily, Charlotte and Anne as I meandered from room to room. 

 


Last modified on Jul. 15th at 4:33pm by Cara Koontz.

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