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One Teen Story #4

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January 16, 2014
Phenomenon by: Julie Buntin

This story left a lot unsaid; it worked and I liked it that way.

For me a short story should not answer every question. Often the subject is better left for the reader to decide the fate of the authors’ characters and that is what I found at the end of Buntin’s story about two newly teenage girls living in Michigan. If done well it is a neat way to make a short story feel like a full life that keeps you guessing, wondering and wanting more but never getting it.

To the story itself: it’s not so much about what happens when people grow up but what happens as people grow up and how it sometimes sucks. What happens to your family, your friends, your body, your interests, your school, who you are and who you love and how sometimes you feel like you haven’t changed but others have, which in turn changes you or at the very least your world.

Now about the cover: I think it’s great. When I first opened the envelope I had no idea what the art represented. Only that it reminded me on an old video game that I use to play on the Atari system back when I was I-don’t-want-to-talk-about-it. Once I finished the story I closed the booklet and immediately recognized the cover for what it depicted and saw how it worked. Thank you Stefan Lawrence. 

Anyone interested in reading this can find it in the Lit House Library along with the rest of Volume II and the complete Volume I of One Teen Story (OTS). If you’d like to read about them click here, here, here and for last year here.

For more about Julie Buntin visit here, read the OTS interview here, and better yet, read her work.


ORB


Last modified on Jan. 20th at 4:26pm by Owen Bailey.