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The Stories Of Their Lives

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    The latest collection from professor and poet Jehanne Dubrow, Red Army Red (TriQuarterly Books, 2012), is a cycle of autobiographical poems that chronicle the author’s coming of age as the daughter of U.S. diplomats in Communist-era Warsaw. “That we experience large-scale, structural traumas as small-scale, personal ones is among the profundities on which Jehanne Dubrow’s Red Army Red is built,” poet H.L. Hix wrote in praise of the collection. Dubrow teaches creative writing and literature and is Director of the Rose O’Neill Literary House.
April 12, 2013
Bestselling author, cultural historian, producer and television commentator, Neal Gabler has been described as “one of America’s most important public intellectuals.”

Bestselling author, cultural historian, producer and television commentator, Neal Gabler has been described as “one of America’s most important public intellectuals.” And he has clearly found his bliss.

This spring’s Patrick Henry Fellow at the C.V. Starr Center, Gabler is writing a book about Ted Kennedy and teaching “The Art of Biography.” Introducing his favorite writers—his favorite ideas—to a small class of WC undergraduates, he positively fizzes with delight: “I am really excited about…” is a favorite preface, and it is disarmingly genuine, whether it leads to a disquisition on the work of Gay Talese or the rigor of the writer’s craft.

This bubbling enthusiasm propelled him through the many years it took to write prizewinning biographies of Walt Disney, Walter Winchell and the moguls who created Hollywood. 

And it fuels his work-in-progress, tentatively titled Against the Wind: Edward Kennedy and the Tortuous Course of American Liberalism. “Biographies are novels with real people,” he says. “I couldn’t ask for a better protagonist.”  


Last modified on Apr. 16th at 1:47pm by Katherine Nau.