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Theatre & Dance

Current Courses

 

 

Courses with Descriptions

  

FALL 2017

THEATRE

 

THE  101 Drama, Stage, and Society I  

(Volansky;  MWF 11:30 am - 12:20 pm)

This theatre history course will examine the development of (primarily) Western drama  against a backdrop of historical and social change. Students will read a variety of plays and  discuss theatre history, dramatic theory, and criticism representing the major currents in  (primarily) Western theatre from its origins to the 18th century CE. We will frequently employ  one or more of the following “lenses” or viewpoints to focus our lectures and discussions: the  physical theatre ​(how the material artifacts of theater—buildings, documents, etc.—tell the  story of theatre history and influence dramaturgy); the social theatre​ (how the theatre relates  to its social context, including consideration of the audience); and the ​ performing theatre ​(the  plays themselves and how they were/are performed). Students will be encouraged to draw  connections between the material we cover in this course and the many intellectual and  aesthetic parallels to be found in contemporaneous trends in history, philosophy, literature,  and the arts.  Theatre Majors and Minors may not take this class pass/fail or as an audit.

THE 181 Theatre Practicum: Crew

Eckelman

This course provides an opportunity for student technicians (lighting/sound/projection operators and backstage crew) of departmental productions (both SCE and faculty-directed) to receive credit for their work. To be enrolled in this course, technicians must participate in technical rehearsals and performances. (Specific duties are determined based on the needs of the production; guidelines are available from the instructor.) Technicians will receive 1 credit (pass/fail) and should expect to devote a total of 20-50 hours over thecourse of the production. This course is open to majors and non-majors. It may be taken for credit only once, although students are encouraged to participate in as many departmental productions as they wish. (Non-credit-bearing participants will be noted as auditors.) To enroll for credit, contact the instructor.

THE 182 Theatre Practicum: Performance

Eckelman

This course provides an opportunity for student performers indepartmental productions (both SCE and faculty-directed) to receive credit for their work. To be enrolled in this course, performers must participate in auditions, call backs, and rehearsals. (Specific duties are determined based on the needs of the production;guidelines are available from the instructor.) Performers will receive 2 credits (pass/fail) and should expect to devote a total of 60-100 hoursover the course of the production. This course is open to majors and non-majors. It may be taken for credit only once, although students are encouraged to participate in as many departmental productions as they wish. (Non-credit-bearing participants will be noted as auditors.) To enroll for credit, contact the instructor.

THE 183 Theatre Practicum: Design

Eckelman

This course provides an opportunity for student designers of departmental productions (both SCE and faculty-directed) to receive credit for their work. To be enrolled in this course, designers must participate in an orientation workshop (scenery, props, costumes,lighting, or sound), production meetings, and a design meeting with the departmental faculty. (Specific duties are determined based on the needs of the production; guidelines are available from the instructor.) Designers will receive 2 credits (pass/fail) and should expect to devote a total of 60-100 hours over the course of the production. This course is open to majors and non-majors. It may be taken for credit only once, although students are encouraged to participate in as many departmental productions as they wish. (Non-credit-bearing participants will be noted as auditors.) To enroll for credit, contact the instructor.

THE 184 Theatre Practicum: Dramaturgy & Direction

Eckelman

This course provides an opportunity for student dramaturgs and assistant directors of departmental productions (both SCE and faculty-directed) to receive credit for their work. To be enrolled in this course, dramaturgs and assistant directors must participate in production meetings and rehearsals. (Specific duties are determined based on the needs of the production; guidelines are available from the instructor.) Dramaturgs and assistant directors will receive 2 credits (pass/fail) and should expect to devote a total of 60-100 hours over the course of the production. This course is open to majors and non-majors. It may be taken for credit only once, although students are encouraged to participate in as many departmental productions as they wish. (Non-credit-bearing participants will be noted as auditors.) To enroll for credit, contact the instructor.

THE 185 Theatre Practicum: Assistant Stage Management

Eckelman

This course provides an opportunity for student assistant stage managers of departmental productions (both SCE and faculty-directed) to receive credit for their work. To be enrolled in this course, assistant stage managers must participate in production meetings and rehearsals. (Specific duties are determined based on the needs of the production; guidelines are available from the instructor.) Assistant stage managers will receive 2 credits (pass/fail) and should expect to devote a total of 60-100 hours over the course of the production. This course is open to majors and non-majors. It may be taken for credit only once, although students are encouraged to participate in as many departmental productions as they wish. (Non-credit-bearing participants will be noted as auditors.) To enroll for credit, contact the instructor.

THE  205 Shakespeare I (ENG 205-10 cross listing)

(Moncrief TTH 2:30 - 3:45 pm)

Reading and analysis of Shakespeare’s best known plays (comedy, tragedy, history, and  romance) both in the context of early modern English culture and as play  scripts/performances.

THE  211 Acting I

(Sommerfeld  MWF 10:30-11:20 am,  MWF 11:30 am-12:20 pm; Daigle MWF 12:30-1:20 pm,  MWF 1:30-2:20pm)

Analysis and application of basic acting techniques with a concentration on scene study and  character analysis. 

THE 221 Directing I

 (Daigle TH 2:30 - 5:00 pm)

Study of the basic principles and practices of directing, including interpretation, structural analysis, and investigation.   

THE  231  Theatre Technology I 

(Stahl  TTH 10:00 - 11:15 am)  

Investigation of methods and materials used in the theatrical production process. Laboratory  hours will be required. This course is designed primarily for those who plan to participate in  future theatrical productions.    

THE 241 Introduction to Theatrical Design

(Eckelman TTH 11:30-12:45)

This course offers a broad look at all aspects of theatrical design, including scenery, properties, costume, lighting, and sound, with an emphasis on inter-disciplinary skills such as close reading (of texts and images), research and clear communication (written, visual and aural). Students will learn to approach theatrical questions from a variety of angles, and will develop a basic understanding of all design elements and how they fit together.

THE  285 Advanced Theatre Practicum:  Stage Management

(Eckelman TH 5:00 - 6:00 pm)

This course provides an opportunity for student stage managers of departmental productions (both SCE and faculty-directed) to receive credit for their work. To be enrolled in this course, stage managers must participate in production meetings, rehearsals, and weekly roundtable discussions with the faculty.  (Specific duties are determined based on the needs of the production; guidelines are available from the instructor). Stage managers will receive 4 credits (pass/fail) and should expect to devote a total of 120 – 200 hours over the course of the production.  This course is open to majors and non-majors.  It may be taken for credit only once, although students are encouraged to participate in as many departmental productions as they wish.  (Non-credit bearing participants will be noted as auditors.)  To enroll for credit, contact the instructor.

THE  308  After ANGELS

(Volansky  MWF 12:30 – 1:20 pm)

This course will study the plays and significant theatrical movements which have occurred since 1992 and the production of Tony Kushner’s landmark play Angels in America. Students will read new works (both published and non-published) by established and emerging American playwrights, with a special focus being placed on the theatrical and social context out of which these works emerged.

THE  310  Renaissance Drama (ENG 312-10, GEN 311-10 Cross Listing)

(Moncrief  TTH 1:00 – 2:15 pm)

The study of the development of the English drama before the closing of the theaters. A cultural approach with emphasis on Kyd, Marlowe, Dekker, Heywood, Jonson, Middleton, Webster, Beaumont, Fletcher, and Ford.

THE  311  Advanced Acting:  Shakespeare

(Fox, B.  TTH 10:00 – 11:15 am)

Development of acting technique using Shakespearean texts with a concentration on physicalization of the role, including movement and voice production. Must have taken THE 211. No previous experience with Shakespeare required.

THE  351 Introduction to Playwriting (ENG 351-10 Cross Listing)

(Spotswood  M  2:30 – 5:00 pm)

Analysis and practical application of techniques and styles employed in writing for the stage.

THE  394  Special Topics:  Stage Management

(Eckelman  MW 2:30 – 3:45 pm)

THE  400  Elements of Production

(Eckelman)

This course provides hands­-on experiential learning for majors and minors through participation in ushering, work calls, and strikes for departmental productions. By enrolling in this course, students commit to completing all required activities during the indicated semester. Course requirements will be clearly outlined by the instructor at the beginning of the semester, but typically include: three ushering shifts, two work calls per faculty­-directed show, all faculty ­directed show strikes, one SCE work call, and two SCE strikes. This is a zero-­credit course and is graded pass/fail. Majors must enroll in and pass the course four times; minors must enroll and pass twice. Students are strongly encouraged to plan ahead, anticipating busy semesters and study abroad. Students must enroll themselves in this course, either during the open registration period or drop/add period.

 

FALL 2017

DANCE

 

DAN 106  Jazz & Musical Theater Dance

(Klopcic  TTH 1:00 – 2:15 pm)

Survey of musical theatre dance from late 19th century African-based dance forms­ through  21st century Broadway show styles. Focuses on the study of ballroom, ballet, jazz, and tap  dance techniques, choreography, their integration in musicals, and selected repertory. “Jazz” is a compendium of movement styles that reflect African and European rhythms blended with cultural, historical, and social themes that produces a uniquely American style of dance. Includes jazz warm-ups and combinations emphasizing rhythm and movement isolations.  

DAN 108 Tap Dance

(Klopcic  TTH 1:00 – 2:15 pm)

Tap is a distinctly American dance form that uses precise rhythmical patterns of foot  movement and audible foot tapping to produce syncopation of sounds. Course will include  instruction in basic steps such as Flaps, Shuffle Steps, Breaks, Time Steps, Waltz Clog,  Cramp Roll, Riffs, Chugs, as well as complex patterns of the feet. Forms such as soft­shoe,  waltz­clog, stage tap, “hoofing,” and Appalachian clogging will be explored. This course is  open to all tappers, from beginning to advanced.

DAN 203  Dance History II:  Concert and Theatrical Dancing

(Moffett  TTH 11:30 am – 12:45 pm)

An in-depth historical exploration of the development of theatrical dance in the Western world  (ballet, modern dance, and theatrical  dancing in Europe  and America)  with a special emphasis on the relationship between dance and other performing arts. The course examines the cultural forces affecting the development of these forms, their origins in  Greek theater and Roman spectacle to the Renaissance, the Golden Age of Ballet, and through the 20th century, and the contributions of the major figures (choreographers, dancers, teachers,  etc.) in the field.

DAN 212  Beginning Ballet

(Cannon  MW 4:00 – 5:15 pm)

Beginning Ballet is an introduction to the fundamentals of ballet technique as well as ballet terminology, traditions, and etiquette. Ballet class begins at the ballet barre and progresses to ballet centre adagio, and allegro combinations, all of which em phasize clarity of line, movement efficiency, range of motion, and artistry. Readings, videos, reflective and analytical writing, and live performance will contextualize the in-class work.

DAN 228  Intermediate Modern Dance

(Moffett  TTH 10:00 – 11:15 am)

Intermediate Modern Dance is a progression of Beginning  Modern Dance.  Students work to develop a keen awareness of their bodies in order to build clarity, movement efficiency, ground ed-ness, and dynamism.   Special emphasis is placed  on  working in optimal alignment, building both strength and flexibility, and negotiating control and abandon. The focus is on technical development as it relates to inviting forward artistry and physical mastery of the body. Readings, videos, reflective and analytical writing, and live performance will contextualize the movement practice.

DAN 233  Dance Composition

(Moffett MW 2:30 – 3:45 pm)

Dance Composition is an introduction to the craft of making dances. It is designed to allow students to experience the process of discovering, creating, and performing original  movement.  Students utilize choreographic theories and compositional devices to develop solo and small group works. Students are encouraged to create in a range of vocabularies. The course emphasizes the development of self­ expression, creative inquiry, and critical awareness. Research, writing, and discussion required.