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Theatre & Dance

Archived Courses

SPRING 2016

THEATRE

 

THE 181 Theatre Practicum: Crew

Eckelman

This course provides an opportunity for student technicians (lighting/sound/projection operators and backstage crew) of departmental productions (both SCE and faculty­-directed) to receive credit for their work. To be enrolled in this course, technicians must participate in technical rehearsals and performances. (Specific duties are determined based on the needs of the production; guidelines are available from the instructor.) Technicians will receive 1 credit (pass/fail) and should expect to devote a total of 20­50 hours over the course of the production. This course is open to majors and non-­majors. It may be taken for credit only once, although students are encouraged to participate in as many departmental productions as they wish. (Non­credit­-bearing participants will be noted as auditors.) To enroll for credit, contact the instructor.

 

THE 182 Theatre Practicum: Performance

Eckelman

This course provides an opportunity for student performers in departmental productions (both SCE and faculty­-directed) to receive credit for their work. To be enrolled in this course, performers must participate in auditions, call­backs, and rehearsals. (Specific duties are determined based on the needs of the production; guidelines are available from the instructor.) Performers will receive 2 credits (pass/fail) and should expect to devote a total of 60-100 hours over the course of the production. This course is open to majors and non­-majors. It may be taken for credit only once, although students are encouraged to participate in as many departmental productions as they wish. (Non­-credit-­bearing participants will be noted as auditors.) To enroll for credit, contact the instructor.

 

THE 183. Theatre Practicum: Design

Eckelman

This course provides an opportunity for student designers of departmental productions (both SCE and faculty-­directed) to receive credit for their work. To be enrolled in this course, designers must participate in an orientation workshop (scenery, props, costumes, lighting, or sound), production meetings, and a design meeting with the departmental faculty. (Specific duties are determined based on the needs of the production; guidelines are available from the instructor.) Designers will receive 2 credits (pass/fail) and should expect to devote a total of 60-100 hours over the course of the production. This course is open to majors and non-­majors. It may be taken for credit only once, although students are encouraged to participate in as many departmental productions as they wish. (Non-­credit-­bearing participants will be noted as auditors.) To enroll for credit, contact the instructor.

 

THE 184 Theatre Practicum: Dramaturgy & Direction

Eckelman

This course provides an opportunity for student dramaturgs and assistant directors of departmental productions (both SCE and faculty-­directed) to receive credit for their work. To be enrolled in this course, dramaturgs and assistant directors must participate in production meetings and rehearsals. (Specific duties are determined based on the needs of the production; guidelines are available from the instructor.) Dramaturgs and assistant directors will receive 2 credits (pass/fail) and should expect to devote a total of 60-100 hours over the course of the production. This course is open to majors and non-­majors. It may be taken for credit only once, although students are encouraged to participate in as many departmental productions as they wish. (Non­-credit-­bearing participants will be noted as auditors.) To enroll for credit, contact the instructor.

 

THE 185. Theatre Practicum: Assistant Stage Management

Eckelman

This course provides an opportunity for student assistant stage managers of departmental productions (both SCE and faculty-­directed) to receive credit for their work. To be enrolled in this course, assistant stage managers must participate in production meetings and rehearsals. (Specific duties are determined based on the needs of the production; guidelines are available from the instructor.) Assistant stage managers will receive 2 credits (pass/fail) and should expect to devote a total of 60-100 hours over the course of the production. This course is open to majors and non-­majors. It may be taken for credit only once, although students are encouraged to participate in as many departmental productions as they wish. (Non­credit­ bearing participants will be noted as auditors.) To enroll for credit, contact the instructor.

 

THE 211-11  Introduction to Acting

MWF    10:30AM-11:20AM  Sommerfeld 

Analysis and application of basic acting techniques with a concentration on scene study and character analysis.

 

THE 211-12  Introduction to Acting

MWF    11:30AM-12:20PM  Sommerfeld 

Analysis and application of basic acting techniques with a concentration on scene study and character analysis.

 

THE 211-13  Introduction to Acting

TTH 11:30AM-12:45PM  Daigle

Analysis and application of basic acting techniques with a concentration on scene study and character analysis.

 

THE 211-14 Introduction to Acting

TTH 1:00-2:15PM  Daigle

Analysis and application of basic acting techniques with a concentration on scene study and character analysis.

 

THE 231-10 Theater Technology

TTH    10:00AM-11:15AM  Stahl      

Investigation of methods and materials used in the theatrical production process. Laboratory hours will be required. This course is designed primarily for those who plan to participate in future theatrical productions.

 

THE 233-10 Creative Process

MW    12:30-2:20       Castro and Castro

*Cross-list with ART, MUS

In this course students learn how to develop an idea over time. Students are expected to focus on one concept and develop it more fully each week as the semester progresses. All media and art forms are acceptable, including the written word, video, performance, painting, photography, sound, construction, etc. Though centered upon the student and their ability to be objective about their work, it also demands they help others to see the values, problems, and potentials in their work. Thoughtful class participation in the form of discussion during weekly presentations and critiques is expected from each student. 3 contact hours per week. Prerequisite: One course of Studio Art, Music, Theatre, or Creative Writing or permission of the instructor. One course of Studio Art, Mus, Theatre, CRWriting or permission

 

THE 241  Introduction to Theatrical Design

TTH    11:30AM-12:45PM  Eckelman

This course offers a broad look at all aspects of theatrical design, including scenery, properties, costume, lighting, and sound, with an emphasis on cross-disciplinary skills such as close reading (of texts and images), research, and clear communication (written, visual, and aural). Students will learn to approach theatrical questions from a variety of angles, and will develop a basic understanding of all design elements and how they fit together. 

 

THE 311-10 Advanced Acting:  Shakespeare

TTH    10:00-11:15AM  Fox

Development of acting technique using Shakespearean texts with a concentration on physicalization of the role, including movement and voice production. Must have taken THE 211. No previous experience with Shakespeare required.

 

THE 311-10 Advanced Acting:  Shakespeare

TTH    2:30-3:45PM  Fox

Development of acting technique using Shakespearean texts with a concentration on physicalization of the role, including movement and voice production. Must have taken THE 211. No previous experience with Shakespeare required.

 

THE 381-10 Junior Seminar

10:30-11:20AM  Fox

This course prepares Theatre majors for their senior capstone experience through a rigorous study of text and context.  Enrollment by permission of the Chair, Department of Theatre and Dance only.

 

THE 317-10 Improvisation 

W 2:30-5  Daigle

This course will examine the history, theory and practice of theatrical improvisation.

Pre-requisite THE 211

 

THE 394-10 SpTp:  Arts Administration

MWF 11:30-12:20PM  Eckelman

*Cross list with BUS and MUS

This course will offer an introduction to various aspects of arts management and administration. Topics may include: production & financial management, institutional leadership, intellectual property, contracting & company management, marketing & public relations, fundraising, governance, and/or planning.

 

THE 394-11  Sound Design

M 1:30-5PM  Perelstein

*Cross list with MUS

This course investigates the use of sound as an element of theatrical design, understanding how technical knowledge and artistic vision combine in this medium. Technically, we will familiarize ourselves with topics including sound system design, recording, mixing, custom creation of sound effects, and we will learn techniques for problem solving in unexpected situations. Artistically, we will explore connections between aural and visual design, discuss sound as space and architecture, and engage with sound as an exploration of aesthetics and style.

 

THE 394-12  “Atomic Family:  History + Performance”

T 2:30-5 Goodheart, Jarboe

*Cross list with HIS, GEN

The study of history has inspired and informed some of the world’s greatest theatre, music, and dance. This course, co-taught by a historian and an actor/director/writer, will engage students from both realms in a collaborative project to create a work of imaginative performance that draws on intensive investigation of history. “Atomic Family: History + Performance” will involve students in researching, writing, designing, and performing a new work with members of the Bearded Ladies Cabaret, an acclaimed professional company whose work often draws on — and plays with — history, from the French Revolution to the American Civil War to the era of Andy Warhol. The company uses a technique known as devised theatre, in which a new production arises from collaborative research, discussion, and improvisational performance by a group of people. Central to the creation of the piece will be a careful examination of recent historical scholarship, as well as period books, films, and music to explore the highly contested institution of the American family in the 1950s and 1960s, the early decades of the “Atomic Age.”

 

*For history students wishing to use this class toward the major/minor, the pre-requisite of HIS 101 and 102 or HIS 201 and 202 is required.

 

THE 400. Elements of Production

Eckelman

This course provides hands­-on experiential learning for majors and minors through participation in ushering, work calls, and strikes for departmental productions. By enrolling in this course, students commit to completing all required activities during the indicated semester. Course requirements will be clearly outlined by the instructor at the beginning of the semester, but typically include: three ushering shifts, two work calls per faculty­-directed show, all faculty­directed show strikes, one SCE work call, and two SCE strikes. This is a zero-­credit course and is graded pass/fail. Majors must enroll in and pass the course four times; minors must enroll and pass twice. Students are strongly encouraged to plan ahead, anticipating busy semesters and study abroad. Students must enroll themselves in this course, either during the open registration period or drop/add period.

SPRING 2016

DANCE

DAN 113-10 Ballet I

TTH    4:00-5:15 Trinh-Smith

Ballet is the spectacular, classical dance form that grew out of 16th century court dances. It has a tradition, a technique, and an aesthetic basis all its own. Codification of steps has been intellectual and based on geometrical-aesthetic principles. The ballet’s movement is motion dictated by taste and selectivity. Ballet I is an introduction to the fundamentals of classical ballet vocabulary; correct body placement; alignment; positions of the feet, head, and arms; flexibility; and basic locomotion in the form. The class is primarily a technique class with emphasis on proper technique at the barre, execution of movement in center and en diagonale with short variations of adagio and allegro. The course differentiates between classical and modern forms and investigates Cecchetti, Vaganova, and Bournonville styles.

 

DAN 203-10 Dance History I:  Cultural Perspectives

MWF 1:30-2:20 Crenshaw

An exploration of specific primitive and ancient cultures as well as contemporary world dance forms and their historical and cultural contexts, including pre-Christian civilizations, the African diaspora, America (Native American and Hawaiian dance and Meso-America), Polynesia, Asia, the Far East, India, Egypt, and Europe prior to the Golden Age of Ballet, and early social dancing and the relationship of dance forms to society and patterns of culture. This course will trace the role of dance as religious ritual, form of education, popular entertainment, and means of passing on a culture’s history—viewing dance in relation to the social, geographical, and political context of each period and culture.

 

DAN 213-10 Ballet II

TTH    11:30-12:45 Klopcic

This course continues the mastery of technique and skill of classical ballet. While emphasis is still on placement of the body, alignment, and proper technique at the barre, center, and en diagonale, variations of adagio, petite allegro, and grande allegro will be more complicated and more lengthy; and students should demonstrate improved physical control and coordination.. Prerequisite: Ballet I or permission of the instructor.

 

DAN 227-10 Modern Dance I

TTH    2:30-3:45 Trinh-Smith

An introduction to basic principles of modern dance as a creative art form: dance movement, body alignment, coordination, strength, and flexibility, movement vocabulary, dance sequences, and musicality. Improvisation exercises and short composition studies will be included. If taken for academic credit, concert attendance and two short papers are required. Focuses on a biomechanical approach to movement and basic principles and techniques derived from the American founders of modern dance—Graham, Cunningham, Limon, and Weidman.

 

DAN 294-10 SpTp:  Movement for Actors

TTH    1:00-2:15 Klopcic

Students will understand and demonstrate movement skills pertaining to theatrical productions, comprehend and utilize choreography within different time periods and styles and have an understanding of basic dance steps to build upon their acting performances. 

 

DAN 310-10 Dance Production/Performance

MWF 12:30-1:20 Trinh-Smith

A practicum of theatre crafts and techniques involved in dance production, including lighting, sound, set and costume design and construction, makeup, stage-management, and filming dance. Includes choreography, production, and performance of student and faculty works, both on and off campus.

 

 

FALL 2015


*indicates a writing intensive course

DRA 194 10  SpTp:Drama, Stage,& Society I

MWF    01:30PM-02:20PM  Volansky   

This theater history course will examine the development of (primarily) Western drama against a backdrop of historical and social change. Students will read a variety of plays and discuss theater history, dramatic theory, and criticism representing the major currents in (primarily) Western theater from its origins to the 18th century CE. 

DRA 205 10/ Shakespeare I

TTH    02:30PM-03:45PM  Moncrief (Cross listed with English)

Reading and analysis of Shakespeare’s best known plays (comedy, tragedy, history, and romance) both in the context of early modern English culture and as play scripts/performances.                                                                                     

DRA 211 10  Acting I

MWF    12:30PM-01:20PM  Daigle (Freshman only)      

Analysis and application of basic acting techniques with a concentration on scene study and character analysis.

DRA 211 11  Acting I

MWF    10:30AM-11:20AM  Sommerfeld 

Analysis and application of basic acting techniques with a concentration on scene study and character analysis.

DRA 211 12  Acting I

MWF    11:30AM-12:20PM  Sommerfeld 

Analysis and application of basic acting techniques with a concentration on scene study and character analysis.

DRA 211 13  Acting I

TTH    11:30AM-12:45PM  Sommerfeld 

Analysis and application of basic acting techniques with a concentration on scene study and character analysis.

DRA 221 10  Directing I

TH     02:30PM-05:00PM  Daigle     

Study of the basic principles and practices of directing, including interpretation, structural analysis, and investigation of basic staging techniques.

DRA 231 10  Theatre Technology I

TTH    10:00AM-11:15AM  Stahl      

Investigation of methods and materials used in the theatrical production process. Laboratory hours will be required. This course is designed primarily for those who plan to participate in future theatrical productions.

DRA 294 10  SpTp: Intro to Theatre Design

TTH    11:30AM-12:45PM  Eckelman

This course offers a broad look at all aspects of theatrical design, including scenery, properties, costume, lighting, and sound, with an emphasis on cross-disciplinary skills such as close reading (of texts and images), research, and clear communication (written, visual, and aural). Students will learn to approach theatrical questions from a variety of angles, and will develop a basic understanding of all design elements and how they fit together. Prerequisites: none

DRA 311 10  Acting II

TTH    10:00AM-11:15AM  Fox 

Development of acting technique with a concentration on physicalization of the role, including movement and voice production. Prerequisite: Drama 211.      

DRA 394 10/ SpTp: Perf Stud: Adaptation

MW     02:30PM-03:45PM  Fox

(Cross listed with English)         

This course explores the theory and practice of adaptation of literature. It will examine the form through the lens of writing and staging an adaptation of short stories, which are useful in size and scope when beginning to learn the various approaches to this kind of theatrical storytelling. The course provides students with a strong introduction to the theoretical and critical body of knowledge in the area of adaptation of literature in the field of Performance Studies. In addition, students will be developing skills in acting, directing, writing, and dramaturgy.

DRA 394 11/ SpTp: Plays 2001-2015

MWF    11:30AM-12:20PM  Volansky

(Cross listed with American Studies)

Arguably, the events of September 11, 2001 changed the world.  Musicians such as Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young and Paul McCartney wrote songs and albums that addressed their loss, while novelists Don DeLillo and Jonathan Safron Foer explored the aftermath in their books.  How did theater artists around the globe respond?  Were there plays that dealt with the issue specifically?  Has 9/11 seeped back into the background?  What are theater artists exploring today, over a decade after the event?  Over the course of the semester, we will investigate plays from around the world (with particular emphasis on plays from the US and UK) written between 2001 and the present.   Special focus will be placed on the theatrical and social context out of which these works emerged. 

DRA 394 12  SpTp:Advanced Design:Costumes

TTH    01:00PM-02:15PM  Eckelman    

This course will provide an in-depth study of theatrical costume design. Topics may include: historical dress, script analysis, visual and historical research, design methods and conventions, rendering, and other costume-related arts and crafts. Students will engage in reading, discussion, research, and critique, and will create costume designs for 2-3 projects. Prerequisites: Intro Design (DRA 294_10) or permission of the instructor

SPRING 2015

DRA 201-10 Theatre of Ancient Greece and Rome

(cross-listed with ENG 394-14)

TTH 8:30-9:45 Walsh

The genre of the dramatic play stands as an enduring legacy of ancient Greece and Rome, and today live performances of classical plays thrive on stages all around the world. In this course we will read representative plays of the Greek and Roman tragedians (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca) and comedians (Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus, Terence). Topics to be discussed include the socio-political context of ancient drama; its adaptation of myth, ritual, and history; its treatment of gender, sexuality, obscenity, and violence; its stagecraft and performance; and the reception of Greek and Roman drama in the modern world.

DRA 211 Acting I

Analysis and application of basic acting techniques with a concentration on scene study and character analysis.

DRA 211-10 MWF 10:30-11:20 Sommerfeld
DRA 211-11 MWF 11:30-12:20 Sommerfeld
DRA 211-10 TTH 11:30-12:45 Daigle (Freshman only)

DRA 221 Directing I    

W 2:30-5:00 Daigle

Study of the basic principles and practices of directing, including interpretation, structural analysis, and investigation of basic staging techniques.

DRA 231-10 Theatre Tech

TTH 10:00-11:15 Stahl

Investigation of methods and materials used in the theatrical production process. Laboratory hours will be required. This course is designed primarily for those who plan to participate in future theatrical productions.

DAN 294-10 SpTp:  Movement for Actors

TTH 1:00-2:15 Klopcic 

 

In ‘Movement for Actors,’ students will learn the physicality of theatre to benefit there overall performance on stage.  Students will be educated in different components of movement including style, technique, and improvisation.  Movement for Actors is designed to help the theatre actor present a dynamic performance on stage with the added opportunity of creative movement.

DRA 294-10 Intro to Theatrical Design

TTH 11:30-12:45 Eckelman 

This course offers a broad look at all aspects of theatrical design, including scenery, properties, costume, lighting, sound, and projections, with an emphasis on cross-disciplinary skills such as close reading, research, and clear communication (written, visual, and aural). Students will learn to approach theatrical questions from a variety of angles, and will develop a basic understanding of all design elements and how they fit together.

DRA 308-10 After Angels – American Theatre Since 1992

MWF 12:30-1:20 Volansky

This course will study the plays and significant theatrical movements which have occurred since 1992 and the production of Tony Kushner’s landmark play Angels in America. Students will read new works (both published and non-published) by established and emerging American playwrights, with a special focus being placed on the theatrical and social context out of which these works emerged.

DRA 311-10 Acting II 

TTH 10:00-11:15 Fox

TTH 2:30-3:45 Fox

Development of acting technique with a concentration on physicalization of the role, including movement and voice production. Prerequisite: Drama 211.

DRA 394-10 Screenplay (cross-listed with English) 

TTH 11:30-12:45 Price

This course will introduce participants to the basic architecture of the film play. Instruction will concentrate on the synopsis, the treatment and sequencing. Through this exploration participants will acquire a basic understanding of conventional and experimental designs of screenwriting.  Students will explore cinematic techniques that provide a vocabulary for creating tightly crafted film stories.

Although heavily weighed toward creative writing the nature of the medium requires a brief exploration of film history and an exploration of the evolution of film technology.

DRA 394-12 Sound Design

M 2:30-5:00 Perelstein

This course investigates the use of sound as an element of theatrical design, understanding how technical knowledge and artistic vision combine in this medium. Technically, we will familiarize ourselves with topics including sound system design, recording, mixing, custom creation of sound effects, and we will learn techniques for problem solving in unexpected situations. Artistically, we will explore connections between aural and visual design, discuss sound as space and architecture, and engage with sound as an exploration of aesthetics and style.

DRA 394-14 Hamlet and it Afterlife (cross-listed with ENG 394-10)

TTH 1:00-2:15

ENG 206 Shakespeare II 

TTH 2:30-3:45

Reading and analysis of Shakespeare’s best known plays (comedy, tragedy, history, and romance) both in the context of early modern English culture and as play scripts/performances.

DRA 401 Dramatic Theory 

MW 2:30-3:45 Volansky

Throughout history, thinkers have been variously excited, enraged, bothered or bored by theater. Through the rigorous study of the writings and historical context of the major thinkers in the evolution of theater (from Aristotle to Ehn), students will come to a greater understanding of the various changes, permutations and responses to theater in the Western World. This course is both Honors Level and Writing Intensive.

DRA 494-10 Junior Seminar

TTH 11:30-12:45 Fox

This course prepares Drama majors for their senior capstone experience through a rigorous study of text and context.  Enrollment by permission of the Chair, department of Drama only.

Fall 2014 

 

DRA 211 Acting I

Analysis and application of basic acting techniques with a concentration on scene study and character analysis.

DRA 211-10 MWF 12:30-1:20 Daigle (for first year students only)
DRA 211-11 MWF 10:30AM-11:20 Sommerfeld
DRA 211-12 MWF 11:30-12:20 Sommerfeld
DRA 211-13 TTH 1:00-2:15 Foster 

DRA 231-10 Theatre Technology

TTH 10:00-11:15 Stahl

Investigation of methods and materials used in the theatrical production process. Laboratory hours will be required. This course is designed primarily for those who plan to participate in future theatrical productions.

DRA 241 Scenic Design

TTH 11:30-12:45 Eckelman

This course investigates the art and craft of theatrical scenery, from play analysis and visual research to drafting and execution. We will explore a range of topics, including visual grammar, historical conventions, properties, drafting, and model building.

DRA 294 Special Topics: Introduction to Theatrical Design

MWF 10:30-11:20 Eckelman

This course offers a broad look at all aspects of theatrical design, including scenery, properties, costume, lighting, sound, and projections, with an emphasis on cross-disciplinary skills such as close reading, research, and clear communication (written, visual, and aural). Students will learn to approach theatrical questions from a variety of angles, and will develop a basic understanding of all design elements and how they fit together.

DRA 312  Renaissance Drama (cross-listed with English)

TTH 1:00-2:15 Moncrief

This course will examine early modern English drama, exclusive of Shakespeare, from the 1580s through the 1630s in its unique cultural and historical context.  It will consider drama as a central cultural performance—both reflecting and creating the dynamic culture of late 16th and early 17th century England.  It will explore  plays by prominent dramatists of the period including Thomas Kyd, Christopher Marlowe, John Lyly, Thomas Dekker, Thomas Heywood, Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton, William Rowley, John Webster and John Ford.  Key issues will include the following:  playing conditions (theatres and theatre companies), the relationship of the stage to the monarchy, the importance of the city (London), the relationship of the stage to dominant religious beliefs and practices, the impact of Puritanism and anti-theatricality, the effect of censorship and licensing, the role of gender and cross-dressing in theatrical representation and the staging of desire.  The course will examine how the dramas of the age comment on and react to, imagine and subvert, their culture.

DRA 394-10 Special Topics:  Devised Theatre: Performing Environment (cross-listed with ENV)

T 1:00-3:45 Daigle and Connaughton

Devised theatre is a genre of contemporary drama that emphasizes collaboration throughout the creative process. In devised theatre, that process does not begin with a finished script. Rather the ensemble—in this case, playwright, director, performers, designers, musicians, dramaturges, and scientists—will create a performance text over the course of the semester. The class will explore issues surrounding humanity and its environment and, through research, class discussion, improvisation, group dramaturgy and other techniques, it will craft a theatrical experience that speaks to one or more of those issues. While individuals within the ensemble will be responsible for specific tasks and assigned certain duties, the shape and content of the work will be determined through a group process.

The course will begin by looking for ways to break preconceptions and disarm received wisdom on the topic of the environment. We will ask the question: How can we shape/wrestle our ideas/thoughts/dreams about this seemingly infinite problem in a way that brings us to a deeper and yet, at the same time, more practical and useful understanding? How can we celebrate the daily gift of our environment when confronted by the specter of an environment that we have altered in irretrievable ways? And: how can we turn that conversation into a work of art that is not precious or obvious?  

DRA 394-11 Special Topics: Acting in High Comedy and Heightened Language

TTH 10:00-11:45 B. Fox

This course focuses on advanced techniques for acting, concentrating on such authors as G.B. Shaw, Oscar Wilde, and Tom Stoppard. Through these authors’ use of heightened language, students will explore what the characters are saying, and how they saying it to each other with wonderful humor, pyrotechnic wit, and the passionate exchange of ideas. Prerequisite: Acting II or Permission of Instructor.

DRA 394-12 Special Topics: Directing Contemporary Drama

TH 1:00-3:45 B. Fox

Builds on the basic principles and practices explored in Directing I, this course explores particular challenges peculiar to the staging of contemporary drama. These include naturalism, magic realism, group scenes, and other topics. Prerequisite:  Directing I

DRA 351 Playwriting  (cross-listed with English)

MWF 12:30-1:20 Volansky

LAB:  TH 1:00-3:45

Analysis and practical application of techniques and styles employed in writing for the stage. Students must enroll in both the lecture (MWF) and the Lab (TH 1-3:45) and will be assigned a workshop group after the first session.

DRA 458-10 Dramaturgy

MWF 11:30-12:20  Volansky

Analysis and discussion of the theoretical and practical aspects of dramaturgy, with particular emphasis placed on script analysis and historical research. This course is not recommended for first-year students.

 

Spring 2013

*All DRA courses except for DRA 105, Principles of Effective Speaking and DRA 200 Theatre Practicum fulfill the Humanities distribution requirement

DRA 105 Principles of Effective Speaking

TTH 2:30-3:45 Rubin

The course is intended to enhance student abilities in the development and delivery of various kinds of public presentations, and to foster skill in the analysis of speeches from the standpoint of the critical listener. This course does not count toward distribution or toward the Drama major.

DRA 211 10-13 (Acting I)

DRA 211-11 Acting I MWF 10:30-11:20 Sommerfeld

DRA 211-10 Acting I MWF 11:30-12:20 Sommerfeld

DRA 211-12 Acting I TTH 11:30-12:45 Daigle

DRA 211-13 Acting I MWF 12:30-12:20 Foster

Analysis and application of basic acting techniques with a concentration on scene study and character analysis.

DRA 221-10 Directing I

TH 1:30-4PM Daigle

Study of the basic principles and practices of directing, including interpretation, structural analysis, and investigation of basic staging techniques.

DRA 241-10 Scenic Design

TTH 10:00-11:15 Rubin

The translation of the play script into visual expression. Concentration on the interpretations, the means of expression, and the techniques of the scenic designer. Laboratory hours will be required.

DRA 311-10/11 Acting II

DRA 311-10 TTH 10:00-11:15 Daigle

DRA 311-11 TTH 1:00-2:15 Daigle

Development of acting technique with a concentration on physicalization of the role, including movement and voice production. Prerequisite: Drama 211.

DRA 331-10 Lighting Design

M 1:30-5:00 Schulman

This class is designed to teach the student the how, what and why of theater from a Lighting Designer’s perspective., from how a theater works from the script analysis process through to production. Other questions involve what the various components of a theater are and how those pieces interact with each other to make a whole, why we do theater and how our craft helps an audience understand a message of a given production.

DRA 394-10 SpTp: The Screenplay

TTH 11:30-12:45 Price

This course will introduce participants to the basic architecture of the film play. Instruction will concentrate on the synopsis, the treatment and sequencing. Through this exploration participants will acquire a basic understanding of conventional and experimental designs of screenwriting. Students will explore cinematic techniques that provide a vocabulary for creating tightly crafted film stories. Cross-listed with English.

DRA 394-11 SpTp:  King Lear Text and Performance

TTH 1:00-2:15 Rubin, Moncrief, Maloney

This course will focus exclusively on the study of Shakespeare’s masterpiece tragedy King Lear, as both a text for reading and a script for performance in preparation for a production of the play (April 4, 5, 6, 7).  It will explore the interpretation of the text, including historical and cultural contexts, formal elements (structure, imagery, characterization, themes, etc.), editing issues, and critical responses to the play.  It will also explore interpretation of the play for performance, including performance history and practical production issues (dramaturgical research, directing and acting choices, scene and costume design).  The course will end with consideration of King Lear in a modern context—why does it matter now? Cross listed with English.

*DRA 394-12 SpTp:  Plays 2001-2012

MWF 12:30-1:20 Volansky

Arguably, the events of September 11, 2001 changed the world.  Musicians such as Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young and Paul McCartney wrote songs and albums that addressed their loss, while novelists Don DeLillo and Jonathan Safron Foer explored the aftermath in their books.  How did theater artists around the globe respond?  Were there plays that dealt with the issue specifically?  Has 9/11 seeped back into the background?  Over the course of the semester, we will investigate plays from around the world (with particular emphasis on plays from the US and UK) written between 2001 and 2012.   Special focus will be placed on the theatrical and social context out of which these works emerged.

*DRA 451-10 Playwriting II

W 1:30-4 Maloney

Advanced workshop in writing for the stage. Prerequisite: Drama 351.Cross-listed with English

*DRA 494-10 Junior Seminar

TTH 10:00-11:15 Maloney

This course prepares Drama majors for their senior capstone experience through a rigorous study of text and context.  Enrollment by permission of the Chair, department of Drama only.

Fall 2012

*All DRA courses except for DRA 105, Principles of Effective Speaking and DRA 200 Theatre Practicum fulfill the Humanities distribution requirement

DRA 105 Principles of Effective Speaking

MWF 10:30-11:20 Rubin

The course is intended to enhance student abilities in the development and delivery of various kinds of public presentations, and to foster skill in the analysis of speeches from the standpoint of the critical listener. This course does not count toward distribution or toward the Drama major.

DRA 211 10-13 (Acting I)

DRA 211-10 Acting I MWF 12:30-1:20 Daigle

DRA 211-11 Acting I MWF 10:30-11:20 Sommerfeld

DRA 211-12 Acting I MWF 11:30-12:20 Sommerfeld

DRA 211-13 Acting I TTH 11:30-12:45 Foster

Analysis and application of basic acting techniques with a concentration on scene study and character analysis.

DRA 221-10 Directing I

TH 1:30-4PM Daigle

Study of the basic principles and practices of directing, including interpretation, structural analysis, and investigation of basic staging techniques.

DRA 231-10 Theatre Technology

TTH 10:00-11:15AM Stahl

Investigation of methods and materials used in the theatrical production process. Laboratory hours will be required. This course is designed primarily for those who plan to participate in future theatrical productions.

DRA 294-10 Intro to Arts Leadership

TTH 11:30-12:45 Patton

This course focuses on the nature of arts organizations, especially those that are nonprofit. Topics covered include organizational culture and structure, planning, governance, programming, fundraising and marketing, an introduction to financial management and budgeting, economic impact, and other major issues from the field.

DRA 306-10 American Musical Theatre

MW 2:30-3:45 Rubin

The study of musical theater in America from the turn of the century to the present with emphasis on the form itself and its history. The course will explore the structure of the musical and the dramatic functions of score, lyrics, and libretto as well as the political, societal, musical, and theatrical reasons for changes in the form.

DRA 308-10 After Angels: American Theatre Since 1992

MWF 12:30-1:20 Volansky

This course will study the plays and significant theatrical movements which have occurred since 1992 and the production of Tony Kushner’s landmark play Angels in America. Students will read new works (both published and non-published) by established and emerging American playwrights, with a special focus being placed on the theatrical and social context out of which these works emerged.

DRA 311-10 Acting II

MWF 1:30-2:20 Daigle

Development of acting technique with a concentration on physicalization of the role, including movement and voice production. Prerequisite: Drama 211.

*DRA 351-10 Playwriting I

W 1:30-4 Maloney

Analysis and practical application of techniques and styles employed in writing for the stage. Cross-listed with English

DRA 394-10 The Screenplay

TTH 11:30-12:45 Price

This course will introduce participants to the basic architecture of the film play. Instruction will concentrate on the synopsis, the treatment and sequencing. Through this exploration participants will acquire a basic understanding of conventional and experimental designs of screenwriting. Students will explore cinematic techniques that provide a vocabulary for creating tightly crafted film stories. Cross-listed with English.

DRA 411-10 Acting III

TTH 10:00-11:15AM Maloney

Advanced study of acting techniques with a concentration on analysis, interpretation, and rehearsal methods. Prerequisite: Drama 311.

*DRA 458-10 Dramaturgy

MWF 2:30-3:45 Volansky

Analysis and discussion of the theoretical and practical aspects of dramaturgy, with particular emphasis placed on script analysis and historical research. This course is not recommended for first-year students.

DRA 494-10 Tennessee Williams: On Stage and Screen

T 2:30-5 Maloney

The course will examine eight plays and their film adaptations, focusing on the extraordinary scope and complexity of Williams� stage dramaturgy and on the efforts to capture that on film. Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, A Streetcar Named Desire, The Rose Tattoo, The Night of the Iguana, Sweet Bird of Youth, The Glass Menagerie, Suddenly Last Summer, Orpheus Descending (The Fugitive Kind in its film version) are the plays and films of our study. In addition we will read and discuss biographical and critical materials to provide context and provocation for our discussion.