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English

Current Courses

Fall 2016

Here are the English courses being offered in Fall 2016 and the different ways in which they can be used to fulfill the English major and the Creative Writing minor. For a full description of each course, including the Special Topics courses, click on the course numbers below.

  • ENG 101 (10-24): Literature and Composition

    ENG 101 11: Lit & Comp            MWF 8:30-10:20        Kurzen           

    ENG 101 12: Lit & Comp            MWF 9:30-10:20        Rydel 

    ENG 101 13: Lit & Comp            MWF 10:30-11:20      O’Connor       

    ENG 101 14: Lit & Comp            MWF 11:30-12:20      Knight                                    

    ENG 101 18: Lit & Comp            MWF 1:30-2:20          Meehan                      

    ENG 101 20: Lit & Comp            TTH 1-2:15                 Wagner           

                          

    This course is intended to develop the student’s capacity for intelligent reading, critical analysis, and writing through the study of literature. There are frequent writing assignments, as well as individual conferences on the student’s writing.

     

    Counts for: Humanities distribution. W2 (writing requirement)

  • ENG 103 10: Intro to Creative Writing (W2 course)

    ENG 103 10: Intro to Creative Writing            MW 2:30-3:35           Hall                

    ENG 103 11: Intro to Creative Writing            TTH 1-2:15                Mooney         

    ENG 103 12: Intro to Creative Writing            TTH 11:30-12:45       Wagner           

     

    A workshop on the forms of creative writing—primarily poetry and fiction—as practiced by the students themselves. Readings in contemporary literature and craft.

     

    Counts for: Creative Writing minor, W2 (writing requirement)

  • ENG 205 10/THE 205 10: Shakespeare I

    ENG 205 10/ THE 205 10: Shakespeare I          TTH 2:30-3:45          Moncrief  

                      

    This course will examine some of Shakespeare’s best known earlier plays (those written before the death of Queen Elizabeth in 1603) both in the context of early modern English culture and as play scripts/performances. Class discussions, with significant contributions from student papers, will explore Shakespeare’s writings as products/producers of early modern culture through the consideration of issues including identity, politics, monarchy, religious conflicts, crime and justice, play and festivity, enclosure and urbanization, world exploration and colonization, nation and national identity, theatricality and theatre-going, religion, family, sexuality, and gender. Using films and live productions (if available) we will also consider the plays as they have been interpreted for performance.

     

    Counts for: Pre-1800, Humanities distribution

    Also counts for: Theatre major

  • ENG 207 10-11: History of English Lit I

    ENG 207 10: History of English Lit I            MWF 12:30-1:20              Rydel 

    ENG 207 11: History of English Lit I            MWF 10:30-11:20            Gillin      

     

    A survey of the development of English literature from Anglo-Saxon times to the present with attention to the historical background, the continuity of essential traditions, and the characteristic temper of successive periods. The second semester begins approximately with the Restoration in 1660.

     

    Counts for: 200-level, Humanities distribution

     

  • ENG 209/AMS 209: Intro to American Lit I

    TTH 11:30-12:45       De Prospo      

    TTH 1:00-2:15           De Prospo      


    Taught in the fall semester, the course is concerned with the establishment of American Literature as a school subject. Texts that have achieved the status of classics of American Literature, such as Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, Thoreau’s Walden, and Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, will be read in the context of the history and politics of their achieving this status. Texts traditionally excluded from the canon of American literature, in particular early Hispano- and Franco-American texts, will be considered in the context of their relative marginality to the project of establishing American Literature as worthy of being taught and studied in the American academy. Other-than-written materials, such as modern cinematic representations of the period of exploration and colonization of North America, as well as British colonial portraits and history paintings, will be studied for how they reflect on claims for the cultural independence of early America. Other-than-American materials, such as late medieval and early Renaissance Flemish and Hispanic still lifes, as well as the works of nineteenth-century European romantic poets and prose writers, will be sampled for how they reflect on claims for the exceptional character of American culture.

     

    Counts for: 200-level, Humanities distribution

    Also counts for: American Studies major

  • ENG 220 10: Intro to Fiction

    MW 12:30-1:20          Knight

    TTH 2:30-3:45            Mooney

     

    This course will survey the rich tradition of prose fiction largely, but not exclusively, in English. Emphasis will be placed on the enduring features of this genre as it evolved throughout the centuries as well as to the innovations introduced by individual writers.  The literary works selected for this course will draw upon a variety of fictional forms and styles.  Class discussions will include, along with close readings of the works themselves, an appreciation of the historical and cultural contexts out of which they arose and to which they gave a fictional rewriting.

     

    Counts for: 200-level, Humanities distribution, W2 (writing requirement)

  • ENG 223: Intro to Drama

    ENG 223 Intro to Drama          TTH 10-11:15          Walsh

     

    This course will examine plays as literary texts, as play scripts, and as performances. It will investigate theatre/drama from a variety of styles and themes across several centuries (from ancient Greece to renaissance England to contemporary USA) to understand dramatic conventions and assumptions. The course will consider how writers from across the globe in various time periods consider, rework, and comment upon similar subjects and themes.

     

    Counts for: 200-level, Humanities distribution, W2 (writing requirement)

  • ENG 294 10: Special Topic: Intro to Journalism

    ENG 294 10: Special Topic: Intro to Journalism     MWF 1:30-2:20    O’Connor       

               

    This course will cover the foundations of reporting, writing, fact checking, and editing. Students will write a range of news and feature stories, including an obituary, an event, and a profile. We will also discuss journalistic ethics and the way the field has been transformed by the Internet.

     

    Counts for: 200-level, Humanities distribution, W2 (writing requirement)

  • ENG 310/GEN 310: The Renaissance: The Age of Elizabeth

    ENG 310/ GEN 310: The Renaissance: The Age of Elizabeth  

    TTH 1-2:15   

    Moncrief

     

    Early Modern England saw an enormous range of popular printed materials– many types of poetry, prose, and drama, of course, but also pamphlets, ballads, broadsides, sermons, conduct books, medical manuals, domestic guides, woodcuts, and more– available for public consumption.  This course will examine a diverse range of “literary” (Shakespeare, Kyd, Dekker, Sidney, etc.) and “non-literary” texts in relation to sixteenth-century early modern culture.  Class discussions– with significant contributions from student writing– will explore print materials as products/producers of early modern culture through the consideration of politics, monarchy, the city, enclosure and urbanization, magic and revenge, nation and national identity, theatricality and theatre-going, religion, family, the body, sexuality, and gender. 

     

    Counts for: Pre-1800, Elective

    Also counts for: Gender Studies minor

  • ENG 323/GEN 323: 19th C. English Novel

    ENG 323/ GEN 323: 19th C. English Novel          TTH 11:30-12:45           Gillin 

                 

    Major writers such as Jane Austen, Emily Bronte, Charlotte Bronte, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, and Thomas Hardy will be studied. Attention will be given to the cultural and literary context of the novels.

     

    Counts for: Post-1800, Elective

    Also counts for: Gender Studies minor

  • ENG 330 10: The Rise of Modernism

    ENG 330 10: The Rise of Modernism            MWF 12:30-1:20           O’Connor


    This course will trace the rise of what we now call modernism beginning with the decadent movement at the end of the 19th century, its emergence during World War I, and its flourishing during the 1920s by reading a range of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama by Henry James, Joseph Conrad, T.S. Eliot, H.D., James Joyce, Katharine Mansfield, Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein, J.S. Synge, and Virginia Woolf among others.

     

    Counts for: Post-1800, Elective

  • ENG/AMS/BLS 345: The African American Novel

    ENG/AMS/BLS 345: The African American Novel        TTH 10-11:15      Knight

     

    This course examines the origin and development of the African American novel. We will begin with the earliest novels and conclude with an analysis of contemporary novels by African American writers. We will examine novels from multiple genres and give careful attention to the intersection of race, gender, class and environment in representative novels of the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries.

     

    Counts for: post-1800, Elective
    Also counts for: American Studies major, Black Studies minor

  • ENG 347/ENV 347/AMS 300: American Environmental Writing

    ENG 347/ENV 347/AMS 300: American Environmental Writing          

    MWF 10:30-11:20     

    Meehan          

     

    The study of writing from an environmental perspective is both an emerging field in literary criticism and a rich tradition in American literary history. What does it mean to be green from a literary point of view? This course explores that question in looking at classic and contemporary authors of American environmental writing, from Henry David Thoreau to Annie Dillard to recent examples of eco-criticism. Though the primary focus will be on nonfiction prose, the traditional home of nature writing, the course will also explore environmental perspectives in poetry, fiction, and film as well as cross-disciplinary connections with the natural sciences and social sciences.

     

    Counts for: Post-1800, elective
    Also counts for: American Studies Major, Environmental Studies Major

  • ENG/DRA 251: Introduction to Playwriting

    ENG/DRA 251 Introduction to Playwriting            T 2:30-5            Maloney

     

    Introduction to writing for the stage with concentration on developing dialogue and dramatic action.

     

    Counts for: Elective

    Also counts for: Creative Writing minor

  • ENG 353 10: Contemporary American Literature: Living Writers (Poetry)

    ENG 353 10: Contemporary American Literature: Living Writers (Poetry)

    TTH 2:30-3:45

    Hall

     

    This semester of Living Writers will study the idea of “lyric apertures.”  Every poem must strike a contract with the world and decide how much to permit entrance.  The balance between a poet’s form and her subject create the tension known as voice.  What happens in a poem with long lines and a roving eye, like those written by Whitman and Ginsberg?  What happens in a poem of intense and narrowed focus, such as those composed by Dickinson and Brooks?  We will analyze the effects of the lyric aperture as well as deployment of line and stanza and strategies of compression or expansion.  We¹ll talk about the short poem and the long poem, about poems in series, about book-length poems, and about grace-note poems and how each of these function.  Students will be asked to compose a final project, write reading responses to books of poetry, and to interview the four visiting writers who come to our class.  This is not a workshop, though writing prompts will be given to help us engage with the specific lyric apertures under examination.

     

    Counts for: Post-1800, elective

    Also counts for: Creative Writing minor

  • ENG/GEN 375 10: Body Language

    ENG/GEN 375 10: Body Language            W 7-9:30            DeProspo

     

    Readings will include fiction that has been labled transgressive, and in all but the very latest examples for a time banned in the U.S.; feminist theory from DeBeauvoir to Judith Butler; and works associated with the pornography debate from Katherine MacKibbon and Andrea Dworkin through Linda Williams.

     

    Counts for: Post-1800, Elective

    Also counts for: Gender Studies minor

  • ENG 393/493 10: Journalism Practicum

    ENG 393/493 10: Journalism Practicum            Th 6-7 pm            McIntire                                                                           

     

    This practicum for The Elm teachs basic news reporting and writing – the who, what, when, where, why & how of story organization; getting quickly to the point; conciseness; straightforward exposition; accuracy, fairness and balance, and ethical issues.

    This is a two-credit course. Students may count no more than 4 journalism practicum credits toward the English major. (Students must take both ENG 393 and ENG 493 to earn credit for a course in the major.)

     

    Counts for: Elective

  • ENG/GEN 394 10: Special Topic: Women Writers to 1800

    ENG/GEN 394 10: Special Topic: Women Writers to 1800

    MWF 11:30-12:20            

    Rydel 


    Early women’s writing, much of it highly popular in its contemporary moment and compulsively readable today, has a history of being forgotten.  In this class, we will explore texts authored by women in the European tradition before 1800, venturing from the continent into the “New World” to find out what the contemporaries and friends of Chaucer, Shakespeare, Jonson, Pope and others were writing.  These gifted women lived lives as exciting as their texts: runaway bride Christina of Markyate, widowed traveller Margery Kempe, aspiring scientist Margaret Cavendish, professional novelist and playwright Aphra Behn, and poet Phillis Wheatley.  The poetry, letters, autobiography, drama, novels, speeches and visionary texts covered in this course represent only a small sampling of the female-authored works that have survived, but our readings provide ample material for exploring how women and men collaborate to create literature, the role of gender in authorial identity, and the contributions of women to the Western literary world.

     

    Counts for: Pre-1800, Elective

    Also counts for: Gender Studies minor

  • ENG 394 11: Special Topic: Comic Visions

    ENG 394 11: Special Topic: Comic Visions          MWF 9:30-10:20          Walsh

     

    “Comic Visions” will explore the nature of comedy through time, culture, and space. Since classical antiquity, comedy as a dramatic genre has thrived on stages around the world, but there is little agreement on what comedy is and its relationships with satire, obscenity, wit, and tragedy. By studying plays, prose fiction, and poetry, we will investigate how the discourse and language of comedy are utilized to tell stories of love, sex, marriage, hypocrisy, inequality, misapprehension, metamorphosis, rebellion, rejuvenation, and utopia. We will discuss the politics of comedy, as well as its persistent interest in money, violence, and the body. Authors to be read include Aristophanes, Catullus, Boccaccio, Jonson, Pope, Austen, Twain, and Beckett.

     

    Counts for: Elective

  • ENG 394 10/AMS 394 10/GEN 394 11: Chican@ Literature

    ENG 394 10/AMS 394 10 /GEN 394 11: Chican@ Literature     

    MWF 1:30-2:20                                 

    Kurzen

     

    This course is designed to introduce students to the literary and cultural productions created by and about Mexican Americans or Chicana/os. Generally, we will approach these works from cultural, formal, and historical perspectives while also focusing on the political and social contexts that inform the events narrated in our course texts. In this class, students will read, analyze, and write about representative works of various genres within particularized cultural contexts. Over the course of the semester, students will consider such topics as identity construction; struggles for self-determination and self-representation; immigrant experiences; language and bilingualism; the marketing of and to Latina/os; and the relationship of the author to his or her communities. While studying how these texts negotiate issues of race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, and nation we will ultimately discuss how they enrich and enliven conversations surrounding American popular culture. 

     

    Counts for:  Post-1800, Elective

    Also counts for:  American Studies major, Gender Studies minor

  • ENG 452: Creative Writing Workshop: Fiction

    ENG 452: Creative Writing Workshop: Fiction            W 4-6:30             Mooney

     

    This workshop offers guided practice in the writing of short fiction.  Using the work of established writers as models, considerable effort is put toward the objective of learning to read as writers and, in the process, becoming better critics of the student’s own work and the work of others in the group.  By offering a more intimate familiarity with the elements of fiction, students write and revise prodigiously and, in the process, learn and practice a repertoire of literary strategies in preparation and in support of short stories of their own composition. 

     

    Prerequisite: ENG 103: Introduction to Creative Writing

    Counts for: Elective

    Also counts for: Creative Writing minor

  • ENG 453: Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry

    ENG 453: Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry            M 1:30-4              Dubrow

     

    Poetry Writing Workshop helps students create 6-8 original poems while thinking critically about form, genre, and the canonical tradition of poetry. Students will respond to and write in an array of aesthetic traditions while also writing analytically about the poet’s tools of craft. Students will read widely and broadly in contemporary poetry, including four single-volume books of poetry. We will read and respond also to prose by poets, all in order to help us discover what makes a thing a poem, and what makes a poem successful. We will immerse ourselves in the world of poetry, in making what Lewis Turco calls “the art of language.”  

     

    Prerequisite: Introduction to Creative Writing. (Students who completed Freshman Creative Writing or Intermediate Creative Writing in previous years are also eligible to register.) Primarily intended for juniors and seniors.

    Prerequisite: ENG 103 Introduction to Creative Writing. Primarily intended for juniors and seniors.

    Prerequisite: ENG 103 Introduction to Creative Writing

    Counts for: Elective

    Counts for: Creative Writing minor