The Revoluntionary College Project
football

ABOVE - A 1938 game  at Washington College

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Justine Hendricks graduated from Washington College in 2007. She majored in American Studies, with a senior thesis on undergraduate life at Washington College during the mid-20th century.

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Above - An early 1900s Washington College football team.

Red SwirlPigskin Pioneers: A History of Football at Washington College

by Justine Hendricks

Colleges and universities spend millions of dollars each year developing championship football teams, using state-of-the-art facilities to attract the most talented and athletic players. For a few months every fall, Americans are captivated by these gridiron gods, young men who happened to be gifted on the football field. For the past 54 years, however, Washington College has been left out of this phenomenon. Although the sport was abandoned in 1952,[1] the school still has a rich football history dating, like the sport itself, to the 19th century. Unfortunately, when the WC football team faded away more than half a century ago, its legacy also disappeared. The story of Maroon and Black football is not exactly epic, but it is full of rivalries, injuries, tough losses, big wins and even a state championship, history that deserves to be remembered and appreciated for years to come.

The first college football game in the United States took place in 1869, pitting Princeton against Rutgers.[2] By the time a Washington College team took the field in 1888, the sport had become a mainstay at colleges and universities nationwide. WC lost its first game to St. John’s College of Annapolis by the almost unimaginable score of 116-0.[3] The game, which lasted only an hour and a half, was not only WC’s first intercollegiate competition – it was the first time the members of the team had played together.[4] Some of the players were not even Washington College students, but in those days, according to Frederick Rudolph’s study of The American College and University, “there were no problems of eligibility.”[5] Despite the assistance of able townspeople, the team, with its absolute lack of practice, was no match for the St. John’s team, which had three years of experience under Dr. James W. Cain.[6] Cain had played football for Yale and would later serve as president of Washington College.[7]

The team did not immediately bounce back from its embarrassing loss in the first game. It didn’t compete again for a year, when it beat Still Pond, 36-0.[8] The strong victory was, unfortunately, not a sign of good things to come for the WC team. In 1890, it again played St. John’s College, this time in Annapolis, and lost, 14-4. Losing by only 10 points, the team seemed to redeem its first loss of more than one hundred points two years earlier. When St. John’s traveled to Chestertown a few weeks later, however, they soundly beat the future Shoremen, 90-0.[9] Washington College’s young team still had far to go before it could compete at the same level as the Annapolis team, but Dumschott reported that its “hardy” young players continued to practice and gain competitive experience, performing “credibly on the football teams of the early 1890s.”[10]

When Cain became president of the college in 1903, 15 years after the school’s first football game, the team was about as far from being a powerhouse as it could possibly get. James M. Cain ’10, Dr. Cain’s son who later became a well-known writer, had grown up watching his father coach St. John’s strong football team. In his essay, “Tribute to a Hero,” published in The American Mercury in 1933, the author remembers his first impressions of football on the Eastern Shore:

“I came from a place where footballs grew on every tree, and I knew the stuff when I saw it…What I saw was a dreadful shock. Only two or three of the candidates were what I considered the proper size…The suits were appalling…Some of the stockings were black with maroon rings, some were maroon with black rings, some were plain maroon, and some were plain black. This was truly alarming…the mettle of a football team can be estimated by the condition of its gear and the snap with which it goes about its work. This outfit had no gear, and God knows it had no snap.”[11]

 

To a boy accustomed to supporting a powerfully athletic team in what many considered the greatest test of manhood short of war, the rag-tag WC team was an unpleasant shock.[12]

During Cain’s administration, however, the team made consistent improvements, eventually becoming competitive with other schools in the area. Cain’s involvement with the team almost immediately made an impact. Soon after his installment as president, the Kent County News reported: “Dr. Cain’s interest, shown by the exertion of his efforts on the field nearly every day toward coaching the team, seems to inspire every player with an aspiration to work hard in the game.”[13] Another transplant from St. John’s College, a Mr. Halbert, served as athletic director for several years and made important contributions to the football program at WC.  The 1909 Pegasus yearbook credits him with “thrusting [football] into the foreground…the interest of the students greatly increased and work on the gridiron pushed to the limit.”[14]

            In the early part of the 20th century, competently guided by men with experience in the sport, the WC football team earned a reputation as a “plucky” team[15] – small and scrappy, if not victorious. Rarely playing opponents of equal ability, WC either won or lost by large margins in the early 1900s. In 1903, the team lost to Delaware College, 27-0[16] before rebounding to wallop the Wilmington Military Academy, 27-0, and the Wilmington Conference Academy, 29-0,[17] ending the season with three wins and three losses.[18] The next season followed a similar pattern: WC opened the season with a 23-0 win over the University of Maryland, but two weeks later was crushed by Villanova, 30-0.[19]

            By 1909, the football program at Washington College was entering a new era. Newspapers on both sides of the bay began to take notice of the “youngsters from Washington College, eastern sho’, Ma’yland, suh,”[20] making predictions and thoroughly reporting on games. Coached by Mike Thompson [fig. 1] and captained by James C. Turner, Jr. [fig. 2], “the star halfback, a man who not only could play a good game himself, but who knew how to get the best work out his men,”[21] the 1909 Maroon and Black team finished with a 3-3 record. Their three close losses, to Georgetown, George Washington and Western Maryland, combined with blowout victories over Gallaudet, Delaware and Rock Hill, demonstrated that WC was moving up in the ranks of the region’s college football teams.[22] The yearbook from 1909 credits “the benefit of [Thompson’s] knowledge as coach and referee” in the team’s improvement, adding, “Gridiron athletics has taken a remarkable stride during the past two years.”[23]

            With the help of Cain and Thompson, Washington College truly arrived on the Maryland football scene in 1910. After a 27-0 loss to Georgetown got the season off to a rough start,[24] WC bounced back to finish the season with a strong showing against Johns Hopkins in the state championship game. WC lost, 9-0, in the championship game, which was played in Baltimore at Homewood Field[25] [fig. 4]. Washington College Coach Mike Thompson helped arrange the game as part of “the dream of his life to bring these two colleges together every Thanksgiving Day and thus revive the old idea of ending a season on that day.”[26]

Fans from both shores had high hopes for the event. A newspaper article from the time reported that WC would “bring a large excursion from Chestertown, Centreville and other Eastern Shore points on the morning of Thanksgiving Day. This enterprise is being promoted by many of the most prominent and influential ladies and gentlemen in Kent and Queen Anne’s.” Among the “prominent and influential” spectators at the game were Maryland Governor Crothers, an Eastern Shore native who had the honor of throwing the game ball onto the field, and Baltimore Mayor Mahool, supporting Johns Hopkins, who blew the whistle to start play[27] [fig. 5]. A newspaper account of the event suggests that the game was a letdown after all the build-up, a “contest listless and unexciting for spectators.” The author of that piece, however, seems to have been biased in favor of WC. He also writes of the “apparent unfairness” that the college “suffered severely at the hands of officials,” and he feels it necessary to point out that none of the Johns Hopkins captain’s successful field goals were from “difficult angles or long distances,” backhandedly diminishing his efforts.[28]

Despite the loss, there was “No Gloom at Chestertown;”[29] the college community was proud of the team’s strong showing in the game as well as throughout the season. Although they lost the championship game, the team could boast of beating Rutgers, a now-Division-I team that was a strong national competitor just this season. G.E. Meekins wrote a poem entitled “They Came, They Saw, But Conquered Not” about WC’s 6-5 defeat of “those husky Rutgers men.” The poem, more of a dig at Rutgers than a pat on the back for WC, lyrically describes the upset: “’Twas Porter’s boot so sure, so true/That won that Saturday/’Twas Meegan’s pass that tied the score/To Garrett playing end/Bauby’s gains round Cimmie’s door,/But yet ’twas all our men” [fig. 6.][30]

The poem provides a strong example of the phenomenon of individual players being singled out as “stars,” but the addition of “yet ’twas all our men” includes the contributions of everyone involved. Frederick Rudolph wrote about “the eminence and universal prestige that football earned for young men whose heads were often permanently turned.”[31] Washington College has never had an athletic program that places athletes on a higher plane than other students, especially not in the early part of the 20th century when its football team was still developing. The 1910 Pegasus said: “We can say very little about the stars of the team, because…all looked like stars.”[32] Although a handful of individuals were recognized in news stories and even in The Baltimore Sun’s annual All-Maryland football team, the emphasis, more than in today’s society, was on the team and the college as a whole. After the 1910 championship game against Johns Hopkins, “the crowd assembled and the football men were cheered and congratulated on all sides for their good work all season;”[33] the entire team, rather than certain players, was the object of admiration.

The team continued its success the following season. In 1911, led by senior captain Stanley Porter [fig. 3], WC went 3-3-2, opening the season with a 0-0 tie with Rock Hill.[34] The team earned a huge win when it beat the University of Maryland team, coached by the legendary Curly Byrd, 15-0. A newspaper report of the game said: “[Washington] simply outclassed the Baltimore boys in all departments of play…the latter were simply run off their feet and smothered with line rushes, end runs, punting forward passes and tacks in such quick succession that they soon became bewildered.”[35] Such a resounding victory over a school that now boasts a powerful Division-I football team was something to boast about even in 1911, when the schools were more evenly matched.

Almost overshadowing the win, however, was the broken leg sustained by Washington’s Phil Wilmer in the third quarter. A news story on the game gleefully reported that “the crack of the bone was heard in the grandstand…There was a thrilling scene when an automobile appeared on the field to take young Wilmer off.”[36] Injuries were not uncommon to football players, but Washington was generally lucky where injuries were concerned. Though plagued by a number of twisted knees, sprained ankles and fractured wrists, WC football players were rarely seriously injured. Considering that 30 college football players died from sports-related injuries in 1909,[37] Wilmer’s broken lower-leg, although “thrilling” to the spectators, was a relatively minor injury from which he made a full recovery.

The exciting 1911 season came to the perfect ending when the WC team beat its perennial rival St. John’s, 11-0. The game, played in Baltimore, was hailed as a “beautiful exhibit of modern football,” in which Porter was “a tower of strength” and “the brilliant star of the game.” WC scored two touchdowns and held St. John’s scoreless as it “destroyed the monotony of continuous defeat” against its arch-rival. The game marked the first time in three years the two schools had met on the football field, and it was a surprise upset as Washington beat St. John’s for the first time to take the state title [fig. 7].[38]

Despite earning the title of Maryland intercollegiate football champions, the sport never became as ingrained in the campus identity as the teams at other schools. As early as 1893, games between traditional rivals, such as Princeton and Yale, garnered widespread excitement among alumni, students, and benefactors; even religious services were subordinate to the big game.[39] Although fans traveled to Baltimore by the boatload for the 1910 showdown against Johns Hopkins, football did not have the same impact on the Washington College community as it did at other schools. At the state championship game against St. John’s in 1911, fewer than 1,000 spectators were present, with only “a few hundred Chestertown rooters.”[40]

At institutions such as Harvard and Dartmouth, alumni became the driving forces behind the growth and professionalism of collegiate football.[41] At Washington, however, alumni were not as active in supporting their alma mater’s team, in part because it did not have the success of many other schools. In 1930, the school sent a questionnaire to alumni asking “What should be done to stimulate Alumni interest in Athletics?” Responses included: “Put out a good football team;” “Produce a ‘real’ football team;” “Go out and get some real foot-ball material;” and “Try to have winning teams.” As Leroy S. Heck, M.D., ’25 pointed out in his response, “It is hard to manifest interest in a losing team.” Wade G. Bounds ’22 was more explicit: “A winning Football team. There is the solution of the whole problem [see attached.][42]

In the football program’s 60 years, WC fielded few winning teams. The 1917 Washington College Collegian reported a “more or less disappointing foot ball season in 1916. The ‘more’ is implied in the fact that we did not win a game.”[43] In the 1920s and ’30s, the “Flying Pentagon” basketball team was a regional power that earned several state championships, but the “gridders” were not as fortunate. In 1922, the players vowed not to shave or get haircuts until they got a win on the football field, prompting a sportswriter to refer to them as “rough-looking customers” who “may scare all the football ability out of [their opponents.]”[44]

One factor in the team’s struggles was the caliber of the teams they faced. After a particularly tough loss, 49-0, at Canisius College in Buffalo, an alumnus wrote a piece in The Washington Collegian wondering if “a mistake has been made in arranging a series of football games with colleges having teams such stronger than Washington can possibly hope to have at present.” He commended the team for its effort, but suggested that a scheduling change could have a significant impact on its record, saying “In almost any game against a team of their own class they would be almost sure to succeed.”[45] In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the differences in ability levels between Washington College and teams such as the University of Maryland and Pennsylvania Military College were small. Several decades later, the teams were obviously mismatched, but because the schools had not been separated into different NCAA divisions, they continued to play each other. As time passed, contests against University of Maryland and Army [Fig. 8], which had been considered “big games” became simply big losses for WC.

The team’s lack of success was disheartening for the college community as it struggled to get excited about a program in which wins were few. Townsend wrote that college athletics “had become an end in themselves, success in them had become everything;” at Washington, the almost complete lack of success was demoralizing.[46] Students released their football-induced frustration in the sports pages of The Washington Collegian. After an 18-0 loss to Blue Ridge in 1926, a Collegian reporter wrote: “Washington lost, and deserved to lose, after playing…a terrible exhibition of so-called football.”[47] To wrap-up the 1927 season, sports editor Ellsworth Estes took his life in his hands when he penned a biting piece about the football team, delivering backhanded compliments and outright slaps in the face in “The ’27 Football Season:”

In this case silence probably would be golden but we cannot pass on into our other athletic activities without saying just a few things about the past season. Not that there is anything in particular to brag about.

It was a hard schedule which meant a hard season and everybody knew it. The coaches knew it, the squad knew it, and the student body knew it.

The coaches should be sympathized with and praised. First there was the hard schedule to face, second there was a noticeable lack of material, and third it is to be remembered that they gave the best they had to do all they could for the college with the material at hand.

The squad (funny as it may sound) should be praised also… [for sticking] it out through a season like the last one. To take a beating Saturday after Saturday and still come back for more was trying on the nervous system to say the least…[48]

 

            The seemingly endless string of losses was trying on the fans as well as the players, but when the football team kept fighting, the fans kept cheering for them. School spirit was encouraged and commended. In a piece submitted to The Washington Collegian in 1925, College President Paul E. Titsworth praised “the support which the students on the grandstand gave their fellows in moleskin on the gridiron at the Mt. St. Mary’s game. I believe I never saw more fervent, substantial college loyalty displayed at any intercollegiate contest,” despite a 12-0 loss.[49] Not even Estes could overlook the students’ devotion to their football team; to conclude his piece on the 1927 season, he adds: “The Student Body should be proud of itself…no one can say that we did not have plenty of pep in the cheering section this year.”[50] In its 1925 Commencement issue, The Washington Collegian shrewdly noted:

You can’t beat any college organization for optimism; especially her athletic teams. Regardless of whether or not her athletes are defeated in the actual playing, when the contest is over, each college immediately boasts of some kind of a victory…Therefore, every college team is returned victorious, in some way...

Washington College claims that her football season for the season of 1924 was one of the best ever enjoyed in her history…We are, however, submitting for the readers’ attention our stats and they may judge for themselves.”[51]

 

Ten years later, the 1934 football statistics proved the season was a success when the team had its only undefeated season, with six wins and one tie. Coached by George Ekaitis, a former Western Maryland quarterback, the team snapped a four-year string of losing seasons with wins over Gallaudet, Johns Hopkins, Mount St. Mary’s, Haverford and the University of Delaware.[52] Before the season began, The Washington Elm proclaimed: “Let us get this fact straight out; this year there is to be a New Deal in athletics.”[53] The team proceeded to reverse a pattern of losing seasons that dated to the 1920s. The team’s strong performances rewarded the patience of the WC student body which supported its team through countless struggles.

The win over Johns Hopkins, the team’s first close contest of the season (its season-opening win was a 51-0 rout of Gallaudet), was cause for celebration. An Elm editorial immortalized the “decisive and spectacular” 6-0 win over Hopkins as “the great athletic victory of last Saturday, when all the sky and shining water combined to make a perfect day for the happy College.”[54] On the same page as an editorial praising the spectators’ impeccable behavior, another piece recounted the manner in which “a quiet, orderly mob of Washington College students began to tear down the goalposts, but a group of Medicos protested by gently but firmly pushing their faces in, and the fun began.”[55] Elm columnist and football player Phillip Skipp wrote: “Yes sir, to open the local football season with a win is a novelty.”[56]

Opening the season with two wins after not winning more than two games a season for at least six years, especially when one of the victories was over a team that was traditionally a strong contender in the state, was a huge accomplishment for the WC team that set the tone for the rest of the season. Halfback Bill Nicholson racked up 50 points on the season, third in the state, to earn him a spot on the All-Maryland team along with lineman Ellery Ward.[57] In 1984, 50 years after “Washington’s greatest year on the gridiron,” the entire team was inducted into the Washington College Athletics Hall of Fame.[58]

The team’s winning streak continued for the first half of the 1935 season. Its first loss, to Delaware on Nov. 2, slammed the brakes on WC’s momentum, and the team finished with a 3-4 record.[59] The next season started with the dismal outlook characteristic of so many WC football teams as a pre-season Elm headline announced, “Ekaitis Gloomy over Prospects.”[60] The team performed respectably in 1936 and 1937, with four wins, two losses and one tie each year.[61] In the late 1930s and early ’40s however, the team began a downward slide; WC football did not have another season in which it won more games than it lost until after World War II.

If the on-field struggles weren’t enough, there was also tension on the squad. In 1941, Coach Ekaitis abruptly told the Enterprise he had dropped Ray Kirby from the team for “insubordination” and for causing “dissatisfaction and dissension” on the team. Kirby told The Washington Elm he was blindsided by the coach’s announcement; he claimed he had been late for a practice but, after running laps as punishment, thought the matter was settled. He said he had done nothing to warrant being cut from the team, but Ekaitis maintained he had to stand firm in his decision. The football team backed Kirby, unanimously signing a petition asking Ekaitis to reinstate their teammate. For someone accused of causing “dissension,” Kirby was certainly successful in uniting his team.[62]

The team soon had to deal with issues much larger than disputes between players and coaches. Less than one month after Kirby was allegedly dropped from the team, on Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese planes bombed the U.S. Naval base at Pearl Harbor, launching the nation into World War II. WC did not field another football team until after the war. Many players, including quarterback Lou Yerkes, [fig. 9] a Little All-American honorable mention, and his teammate Frank Gibe [fig. 10], played football with their special training units.[63] John T. “Tom” Kibler, WC athletic director and assistant football coach for many years, served as a special services officer in the war and attained the rank of major. Kibler, like many others associated with the athletic program at Washington College, had also served in World War I.[64] Frederick Stanley Porter, who captained the football team in 1911 when it won the state championship, was stationed at Camp Meade during the summer of 1918, while Philip George Wilmer, who sustained a broken leg in the team’s win over the University of Maryland, served as sergeant first class of the 264 Aero Quadron.[65] Ed Keenan ’25 [fig. 11], the 345-pound, two-time All-Maryland lineman, played football in basic training at Camp Devens after being drafted in 1917; enrolling in college after his discharge, he was one of the biggest men to play on a WC football team and went on to play for two professional teams.[66]

In the 1890s, football was lauded for making men tough and some proponents of the sport said it “prepared a man for the hardest knocks of all, for war.”[67] Many WC football players put that theory into practice during both World Wars. An Elm article from 1946 pointed out: “While college gridiron battles will be new to some of the members of the Washington squad, war and battle for more than pigskin honor is old stuff to most of them.” When the school resumed football in the fall of 1946, the majority of the team members – 36 of the 41 men on the squad – were veterans.[68]

Washington College only fielded a football team for five years after World War II. In the 1946 season, the team, still regrouping after the war, only won one game.[69] Over the next four seasons however, the squad gained experience on the playing field and grew steadily stronger. Dominic “Dim” Montero, who had served in the Pacific during World War II, was hired as the new head coach in 1949.[70] In two seasons under his leadership, the team was 8-5-2 and continuing to improve.[71]

Early in 1951, however, the administration announced there not be a football team that year. Baseball was also cancelled for that spring. The school was struggling financially, and with the onset of the Korean War, the college expected fewer male students to enroll in the fall. A letter to the Board of Visitors and Governors from 1951 said: “In view of the uncertain conditions existing at the present time, the Athletic Council of Washington College recommends to the Board of Visitors and Governors that the college not participate in intercollegiate football during the fall of 1951.” Board members regretfully, but overwhelmingly, voted to drop the sport to alleviate the school’s financial situation since, as Director of Physical Training Ed Athey told The Washington Elm,  at least half the athletic budget was allotted toward the football team.[72] At the time of the decision, 15 students had already withdrawn from school “as a result of the current national emergency,” and it was expected that even more would leave at the end of the semester.[73] The decision, although sensible, was a harsh blow to the athletic program at WC. Coach Montero told The Elm, “I regret very much that football has to be dropped, as we seem to be making some headway…I especially regret having to leave the boys on the football team. The two years that I have worked with them were two of my happiest years of coaching.” Initially, everyone expected football to return after a few years as it had after taking a brief hiatus during World War II. Montero continued to be a phys ed teacher at the college, and The Elm reported that “Athey expressed the hope to revive the two sports as soon as conditions become ‘feasible.’”[74]

Fifty-six years have passed, yet football still has not been reinstated. Enrollment has increased exponentially since the 1950s, when the administration cited a drop in enrollment and a decline in available male students as reasons for discontinuing the football program.[75] Since 1951, re-establishing a team has been suggested several times. In 1971, an intramural football club was formed to bring the sport back to Chestertown. Because club sports are student-run, it would be less expensive than maintaining a varsity team. Local youth league football coach Walter Kirby was hired to coach the squad, and the club started fundraising to obtain the approximately $25,000 needed to jump-start the organization. Club spokesman Mike Macielag said, “In order for football to become a reality at Washington College, the student body has to be willing to go out and get it…Unless a large group of students are willing to make some sacrifices NOW, sacrifices of both time and talent, football will never ‘Happen Here.’”[76] The students were apparently not willing to make the necessary sacrifices because, to date, the only football that has ‘Happened Here’ is intramural flag football.

The history of football at Washington College spans more than 60 years. During that time, the teams, statistically, had more failures than successes, but as was frequently noted in The Washington Collegian, The Washington Elm, and The Pegasus yearbooks, the student body continued to support its “gridders.” It was undoubtedly frustrating to support a football program with three wins and 33 losses over the four years between 1930 and 1933, but it made the successes even sweeter. The team’s successes were few and far between, but they were significant achievements around which other schools have built competitive athletic programs. At times, the team struggled so much that headlines proudly proclaimed they’d finally scored, but in good years, the Maroon and Black went undefeated and won a state championship.[77]

The 1950 season, the final season, was the team’s best year since 1934, when it was undefeated. The program had been gradually, but consistently, improving when it was abruptly dropped from the college. If the team and the players had been given the opportunity to continue to gain experience and expertise under Dim Montero, could Washington College have developed into a perennial powerhouse, or would the team have slipped back into the pre-World War II pattern of 0-9 records? The college community will never know; many people don’t even know the school had a football team (although there are many things about WC football that are best forgotten). People should know, however, that the players never chased a national championship or maintained a multi-season win streak; winning a Maryland Intercollegiate Championship and having one undefeated season were the program’s highlights.

The Washington College football team might not have churned out superstar athletes who left school early to go pro, but it shaped hard-working young men who represented their school proudly and nobly, even in the face of humiliating defeats, and who courageously served their country in wartime, even when their lives were at stake. Many of the Washington College football players truly were heroes; sadly, today they are all but forgotten.

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“Blue and Gray Given a Surprise.” Unidentified clipping circa 1910, Miller Library

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Cain, James M. “Tribute to a Hero.” The American Mercury 30, no. 119 (1933): 281-282,

copy from Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923, James M. Cain.

 

 “College Notes.” Kent County News, 14 Nov 1903, Miller Library Archives: Vertical

Files, 1873-1923, Kent County News 1903-1918 – Articles on Washington

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“Eastern vs. Western Shore; Washington College to Meet Hopkins Thanksgiving Day.”

Unidentified clipping circa 1910, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-

1923, Stanley Porter Scrapbook.

 

“The Football Field.” Kent News, 14 December 1889, transcript in Miller Library

Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923, Excerpts from Kent County News Aug 31,

1889-Dec 3, 1890.

 

“Foot Ball Season Opens.” Unidentified clipping, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files,

1873-1923, Stanley Porter Scrapbook.

 

Garrett, Harold B. “Athletic Notes,” The Washington College Collegian, 1917, pg. 22,

Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1915-1926 – Cain 1903-1918/C. Gould

1918-1923/P. Titsworth 1924-1933, WC Collegian 1917.

 

“Georgetown Wins.” Unidentified clipping circa 1910, Miller Library Archives: Vertical

Files, 1873-1923, Stanley Porter Scrapbook.

 

“Hopkins Has Claim as Best Eleven in State.” Unidentified clipping circa 1910, Miller

Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923, Stanley Porter scrapbook. 

 

Letters to members of the Board of Visitors and Governors, Miller Library Archives:

Vertical Files 1948-1951, Daniel Z. Gibson, 1951 Football – Board Action

 

“Maryland Eleven,” The Baltimore Sun, 29 Nov 1910, Miller Library Archives: Vertical

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Meekins, G.E. “They Came, They Saw, But Conquered Not” circa 1910, Miller Library

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“Montero Named Football Coach.” Washington College Alumnus & Bulletin, Spring

1949, p. 5, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files 1936-1939, G.W. Mead cont’d, Mead Binder.

 

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 “State Title at Stake…Washington Lads are Ready.” unidentified newspaper clipping

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“Wash 11 – St. John’s 0.” Kent News, 2 Dec 1911, Miller Library Archives: Vertical

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Other Sources

 

“WC Scores on Temple,” The Washington Elm, 27 October 1928, p. 3.

 

“15 From College Leave for Service,” The Washington Elm, 12 January 1951, p. 1.

 

“Dr. Jones was Gridiron Fullback,” The Washington Elm, 15 December 1934, p. 1.

 

Dumschott, Fred W. Washington College. Chestertown: Washington College, 1980.

 

Dunphy, Bill. The Washington Elm, 10 December 1971, p. 7.

 

“Edward Felix Keenan.” Washington College Hall of Fame,

<http://athletics.washcoll.edu/halloffame/1981/ek25.html> (1 December 2006).

 

“Ekaitis Gloomy Over Prospects.” The Washington Elm, 26 September 1936, p. 3.

 

Estes, Ellsworth. “The ‘27 Football Season.” The Washington Collegian, 14 December

1927, p. 3.

 

Ford, H.P. “An Old Grad Sees the Game.” The Washington Collegian, 26 October 1927,

p.3.

 

“Gridders Petition Coach,” The Washington Elm, 14 November 1941, p.1.

 

“Hall of Fame Honored Teams.”

<http://athletics.washcoll.edu/halloffame_honoredteams.php>  (22 November

2006).

 

“Intercollegiate Football Returns to Chestertown.” The Washington Elm, 10 December

1971, p. 7

 

 

Landskroener, Marcia C. ed. Washington: The College at Chester. Chestertown: The

Literary House Press at Washington College, 2000.

 

Larkin, Drew. “Kirby to Coach Club Football.” The Washington Elm, 10 December 1971,

p. 7.

 

The Pegasus. 1909, 1910, 1927-1950.

 

“Remembrance of Gala Hopkins Trip.” The Washington Elm, 27 October 1934, p. 2.

 

Rudolph, Frederick. The American College and University: A History. Athens: University

of Georgia Press, 1990.

 

“Sho’men Return to Grid Battles After 4 Years.” The Washington Elm, 11 October 1946,

p. 1.

 

Skipp, Phillip. “Football Prospects Fine.” The Washington Elm, 22 September 1934, p. 3.

 

--- “Skipping Over the Sports.” The Washington Elm, 20 October 1934, p. 3.

 

Titsworth, Paul E. “Washington Needs Student Memorials.” The Washington Collegian,

14 November 1925, p. 1

 

Townsend, Kim. Manhood at Harvard. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press,

1998.

 

“Varsity Football, Baseball Dropped.” The Washington Elm, 9 February 1951, p. 1.

 

“Victory and Honor.” The Washington Elm, 27 October 1934, p. 2.

 

“Washington Falls to Blue Ridge Eleven.” The Washington Collegian, 6 November 1926,

p. 1.

 

“Washington Loses to Mt. St. Mary’s.” The Washington Collegian, 14 November 1925,

p. 5.

 

“Washington’s Win Streak Broken by Delaware.” The Washington Elm, 2 November

1935, p. 3

 

“WC Scores on Temple.” The Washington Elm, 27 October 1928, p. 3.

 

“Wearers of ‘W’ Play for Service Squads.” The Washington Elm, p. 4.

 


 

[1] Fred W. Dumschott, Washington College (Chestertown: Washington College, 1980), 258.

[2] Frederick Rudolph, The American College and University: A History (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1990), 373.

[3] Marcia C. Landskroener, ed., Washington: The College at Chester (Chestertown: The Literary House Press at Washington College, 2000), 217.  **Elm articles from 12/15/1934 (“Dr. Jones was Gridiron Fullback,” p. 1) and 12/10/1971 (p. 7) record the score as 126-0 in favor of St. John’s.

 

[4]Landskroener, 217.

[5] Rudolph, 374.

[6] Landskroener, 217.

[7] Dumschott, 151.

[8] “The Football Field,” Kent News, 14 December 1889, transcript in Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923, Excerpts from Kent County News Aug 31, 1889-Dec 3, 1890.

[9] “A Pleasant Trip and a Defeat,” Kent News, 13 December 1890, transcript in Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923, Excerpts from Kent County News Aug 31, 1889-Dec 3, 1890.

[10] Dumschott, 128.

[11] James M. Cain, “Tribute to a Hero,” The American Mercury 30, no. 119 (1933): 281-282.

[12] Kim Townsend, Manhood at Harvard (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1998), 102-103.

[13] “W.C. Notes,” Kent County News, 3 Oct 1903, transcript in Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923, KCN 1903-1918, Articles on Washington College during Dr. Cain’s Administration.

[14] The Pegasus, 1909, p. 88.

[15] Unidentified newspaper clipping circa 1910 from the Stanley Porter scrapbook, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923. **The scrapbook is in the very back of the 1873-1923 drawer. It contains news clippings, photographs and other mementos. I believe it belonged to Stanley Porter because he is prominently featured and because it also contains some keepsakes from Western Maryland College, where he coached after leaving WC. There is nothing in the book that definitively identifies it as Porter’s, but I refer to it as “the Stanley Porter scrapbook” in my footnotes and bibliography.

[16] “One for Delaware,” Kent County News, 10 Oct 1903, Miller Library Archives:Vertical Files, 1873-1923, Kent County News 1903-1918 – Articles on Washington College during Dr. Cain’s Administration

[17] “College Notes,” Kent County News, 14 Nov 1903, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923, Kent County News 1903-1918 – Articles on Washington College during Dr. Cain’s Administration.

[18] “W.C. Notes,” Kent County News, 28 Nov 1903, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923, Kent County News 1903-1918 – Articles on Washington College during Dr. Cain’s Administration

[19]“Then…and Now,” Kent County News, 15 Oct 1954, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923, Football, W.C. 1904; “Then and Now…” Kent County News, 29 Oct 1954, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923, Football, W.C. 1904.

[20] “Blue and Gray Given a Surprise,” unidentified clipping circa 1910 from the Stanley Porter scrapbook, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923.

[21] “Football,” The Pegasus, 1910.

[22] Unidentified newspaper clipping circa 1909 from the Stanley Porter scrapbook, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923.

[23] Pegasus, 1909, p. 89.

[24] “Georgetown Wins,” unidentified clipping circa 1910 from the Stanley Porter scrapbook, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923.

[25] “Hopkins Has Claim as Best Eleven in State,” unidentified clipping circa 1910 from the Stanley Porter scrapbook, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923.

[26] “State Title at Stake…Washington Lads are Ready,” unidentified newspaper clipping circa 1910, Stanley Porter Scrapbook, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923.

[27]“Eastern vs. Western Shore; Washington College to Meet Hopkins Thanksgiving Day,” unidentified clipping circa 1910, Stanley Porter Scrapbook, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923.

[28] “Hopkins Has Claim as Best Eleven in State.”

[29] “No Gloom at Chestertown,” The Baltimore Sun, circa 1910, Stanley Porter Scrapbook, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923.

[30] G.E. Meekins, “They Came, They Saw, But Conquered Not,” circa 1910, Stanley Porter scrapbook, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923.

[31] Rudolph, 389.

[32] Pegasus, 1910, p.?

[33] “Maryland Eleven,” The Baltimore Sun, 29 Nov 1910, Stanley Porter scrapbook, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923.

[34] “Foot Ball Season Opens,” unidentified clipping, Stanley Porter scrapbook, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923.

[35] “Washington Wins,” unidentified clipping, 1 Nov 1911, Stanley Porter scrapbook, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923.

[36] “Washington Wins.”

[37] Townsend, 104.

[38] “Wash 11 – St. John’s 0,” Kent News, 2 Dec 1911, Stanley Porter Scrapbook, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1873-1923.

[39] Rudolph, 375.

[40] “Wash 11 – St. John’s 0.”

[41] Rudolph, 383.

[42] Responses from Harvey B. Hall, Charles M. Saiman ‘25, Stanley G. Robins ‘21, W.E. Twilley ‘26, Leroy S. Heck, M.D. ‘25, and Wade G. Bounds ‘22, Questionnaires to Alumni by J.S. William Jones & Replies – Summer 1930, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1926-1931, Paul Titsworth cont… **It was difficult to decipher some of the signatures on the handwritten replies so the names could be slightly incorrect by a letter or two. Copies are attached.

[43] Harold B. Garrett, “Athletic Notes,” The Washington College Collegian, 1917, pg. 22.

[44] Untitled clipping from The Baltimore Evening Sun circa 1922, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files, 1915-1926, General – Athletes – 1921-1924.

[45] H.P. Ford, “An Old Grad Sees the Game,” The Washington Collegian, 26 October 1927, p. 3.

[46] Townsend, 127.

[47] “Washington Falls to Blue Ridge Eleven,” The Washington Collegian, 6 November 1926, p. 1.

[48] Ellsworth Estes, “The ‘27 Football Season,” The Washington Collegian, 14 December 1927, p. 3.

[49] Paul E. Titsworth, “Washington Needs Student Memorials,” The Washington Collegian, 14 November 1925, p. 1; “Washington Loses to Mt. St. Mary’s,” The Washington Collegian, 14 November 1925, p. 5.

[50] Estes, p. 3.

[51] The Washington Collegian, Commencement 1925, p. 22-23.

[52] Landskroener, 233.

[53] Phillip Skipp, “Football Prospects Fine,” The Washington Elm, 22 September 1934, p. 3.

[54] Skipp, “Skipping Over the Sports,” The Washington Elm, 20 October 1934, p. 3; “Victory and Honor,” The Washington Elm, 27 October 1934, p. 2.

[55] “Remembrance of Gala Hopkins Trip,” The Washington Elm, 27 October 1934, p. 2.

[56] Skipp, “Skipping Over the Sports,” The Washington Elm, 20 October 1934, p. 3.

[57] Landskroener, 233.

[58] “Football,” The Pegasus, 1935, p. 127; “Hall of Fame Honored Teams,” http://athletics.washcoll.edu/halloffame_honoredteams.php  (22 November 2006).

[59] “Washington’s Win Streak Broken by Delaware,” The Washington Elm, 2 November 1935, p. 3; The Pegasus, 1936, p.?

[60] “Ekaitis Gloomy Over Prospects,” The Washington Elm, 26 September 1936, p. 3.

[61] The Pegasus, 1936, p. ?; The Pegasus, 1937, p.?

[62] “Gridders Petition Coach,” The Washington Elm, 14 November 1941, p.1.  ** I found no additional information about this situation or how it was resolved. The season was coming to a close, and with the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the cancellation of football for the next four seasons, the disagreement between Kirby and Ekaitis probably became irrelevant.

[63] The Washington Elm, 19 December 1941, p. 1; “Wearers of ‘W’ Play for Service Squads,” The Washington Elm, date, p. 4.

[64] “Named Assistant to Camp Head,” The Enterprise, 5 January 1944.

[65] Records of WC Servicemen, WWI – 1917, Miller Library Archives: 1918-1926.

[66] “Edward Felix Keenan,” Washington College Hall of Fame, <http://athletics.washcoll.edu/halloffame/1981/ek25.html> (1 December 2006).

[67] Townsend, 102.

[68] “Sho’men Return to Grid Battles After 4 Years,” The Washington Elm, 11 October 1946, p. 1.

[69] The Pegasus, 1947.

[70] “Montero Named Football Coach,” Washington College Alumnus & Bulletin, Spring 1949, p. 5, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files 1936-1939, G.W. Mead cont’d, Mead Binder. **The “Mead Binder” is a black zippered binder containing, among other things, photographs of Mead with Harry Truman and telegrams to Mrs. Mead after her husband’s death.

[71] The Pegasus, 1950, p. ?; The Pegasus, 1951, p. ?

[72] Letters to members of the Board of Visitors and Governors, Miller Library Archives: Vertical Files 1948-1951, Daniel Z. Gibson, 1951 Football – Board Action; “Varsity Football, Baseball Dropped,” The Washington Elm, 9 February 1951, p. 1.

[73] “15 From College Leave for Service,” The Washington Elm, 12 January 1951, p. 1.

[74] “Varsity Football, Baseball Dropped.”

[75] Letter to Board members.

[76] “Intercollegiate Football Returns to Chestertown,” The Washington Elm, 10 December 1971, p. 7; Drew Larkin, “Kirby to Coach Club Football,” The Washington Elm, 10 December 1971, p. 7.

[77] “WC Scores on Temple,” The Washington Elm, 27 October 1928, p. 3. ** The score of the game was 73-7, but after a losing streak dating to the 1927 season where they were the “0” on the end of 33-0, 20-0, 75-0, 31-0, 26-0, 39-0 and 34-0 losses, one touchdown was something to get excited about. By the time WC lost to Temple by 66 points, the sportswriters and students were clinging for dear life to each shred of silver lining they could find.

 


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