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Sociology and Anthropology

 

NOTE: This page contains information from the 2012-2013 Catalog. It remains available for archival purposes only. For the most current WC Catalog content, please visit http://catalog.washcoll.edu and download this year’s edition.

Division of Social Sciences

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology offers a major and a minor in both sociology and anthropology.

Sociology is the study of human social interaction. Courses in sociology help students gain a general understanding of human society, understand how individuals’ lives are shaped by social forces, develop theoretical and analytic skills appropriate for graduate or professional school programs, prepare for careers in social service or allied fields, and acquire theoretical and practical knowledge for careers in business and industry. Recent graduates have gone on to professional or graduate schools in sociology, anthropology, law, criminology, social work, and teaching. Graduates have found employment in those fields, and also the Peace Corps, counseling, corrections, the armed services, banking, public relations, human resources management, and other corporate and nonprofit positions.

The Sociology Major

Sociology 101 is prerequisite for the major in sociology. Additionally, prospective majors should complete at least two additional sociology courses by the end of their sophomore year, and the major’s statistics requirement, which must be satisfied no later than the fall semester of junior year to avoid later problems in completing the Senior Capstone Experience.

The Senior Capstone Experience

During the senior year, each sociology major completes a major independent research project with the guidance of one of the department’s sociologists. Senior Capstone Experiences integrate the diverse learning that students have accomplished throughout their undergraduate years, not only within the major, but also across the liberal arts and sciences. During their junior year, students will learn about constructing research proposals and the steps to carrying out their own research and analysis in preparation for completing the Senior Capstone Experience. The range both of topics and methods is broad; the Capstone Experience is an independent research project, on a topic of the student’s choosing, with the guidance of a faculty member to assure that it is both significant and capable of completion in the time available. Work on the Capstone is supported by the student’s capstone advisor, and by some of the work of the Sociology Senior Seminars, SOC 001 taken during the fall semester and SOC 002 taken during the spring semester. Course credit for this project is awarded through registration, in the spring semester, for SOC SCE.  Academic research is most meaningful when it is shared with the larger academic community. Thus, completed projects will be published on the Miller Library’s Web site.

Required For The Major In Sociology

Ten courses: Sociology 101, 303, and 306, the statistics requirement, the Senior Capstone Experience, five additional courses in sociology; and Sociology 001-002. (Students with a double major in sociology and psychology and who complete a research methods course or sequence in psychology may omit Sociology 306, but must then take a sixth sociology elective.)

Concentrations within the Sociology Major

Social Welfare: Students who complete this concentration will be well-prepared for entry-level positions in the field, and for graduate work in social welfare and social policy. Students wishing to achieve official recognition of the concentration must complete a minimum of four courses. Sociology 382, 483, and 484 are required. In addition, students will complete at least one of the following courses: Sociology 212, 240, 341, 347; Anthropology 105; or Psychology 304.

Students planning to do graduate work in sociology should take the following courses: Sociology 221, 250, 262, and 356. All students, of course, should strive for insight into the nature of human society. Additional courses in the program should be planned in consultation with the chair to meet individual needs and interests. Sociology and anthropology majors may become certified to teach social studies in secondary schools. To assure proper scheduling, students interested in this program should inform the chairs of both the Sociology and Anthropology Department and the Education Department as early as possible in their college careers.

Required for the Minor in Sociology

Six courses, of which Sociology 101, 303, 306, and the statistics requirement are required; and two additional courses in sociology. (Students with a major in psychology and who complete a research methods course or sequence in psychology may omit Sociology 306, but must then take a third sociology elective.)

The Statistics Requirement

This requirement, a prerequisite for Research Methods in Sociology, may be met by taking either MAT 109 or PSY 209.

Anthropology

Anthropology is the study of human nature, human culture, and the human past. It encompasses several subdisciplines, including sociocultural anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, and biological anthropology. The concept of culture illuminates the human condition in powerful ways. Anthropology helps students understand human biocultural diversity and the importance of culture for framing how groups understand the world. Anthropology graduates find employment opportunities in the public and private sector, in government agencies, NGOs, corporations, museums, and in academia. Businesses are increasingly hiring anthropologists as “cultural brokers.” Recent graduates have continued postgraduate work in anthropology and have found careers in health departments, tourism, grant writing, socio-political analysis, education, and museum work. We often have assistantships available to students interested in geographic information systems, cultural resource management in archaeology and historic preservation, and we offer a summer field school in archaeology in addition to summer programs in the Southwest and Denmark.

The Major

Prospective anthropology majors should complete Anthropology 105, 107, and at least one of the following courses by the end of their sophomore year: Anthropology 208, 215, 235, 305, or 355.

The Senior Capstone Experience

During the senior year, each anthropology major completes a major independent research project with the guidance of one of the department’s faculty members. Senior Capstone Experiences integrate the diverse learning that students have accomplished throughout their undergraduate years, not only within the major, but also across the liberal arts and sciences. The range both of topics and methods is broad; the Capstone Experience is an independent research project, on a topic of the student’s choosing, undertaken with the close guidance of a faculty thesis advisor. Thesis proposals typically are developed by students in the Anthropology Seminar during the spring of their third year. Course credit for this project is awarded through registration, in the fall or spring semester of the senior year, for ANT SCE. Academic research is most meaningful when it is shared with the larger academic community. Thus, completed projects will be published on the Miller Library’s Web site.

Required for the Major in Anthropology

Ten courses: Anthropology 105, 107, 208, 305, 405, four additional courses in anthropology, and the Senior Capstone Experience (ANT SCE). It is strongly recommended that majors have at least one study abroad experience during their undergraduate career. In addition to the required courses, all majors in anthropology complete either a major research paper or a special research project to satisfy their Senior Capstone Experience.

Students who major in Anthropology may wish to pursue a regional concentration. These concentrations are administered through the International Studies Program, but students are not required to major in International Studies. Current regions of study include African Studies, Asian Studies, European Studies, Latin American Studies and Near Eastern Studies. More information about the requirements for these concentrations can be found in the International Studies Program section of this catalog.

Required for the Minor in Anthropology:

Six courses, including Anthropology 105, 107, and either 208 or 305, plus three additional anthropology courses (CRS 242 may count as an Anthropology elective).

The Distribution Requirement in Social Science

May be satisfied by one of the following course sequences:

  • Sociology 101 and any one of the following: Sociology 212, 213, 221, 240, 250, 341; or
  • Anthropology 105 and any one of the following: ANT 215, 235, 280, 320, CRS 242; or
  • Anthropology 107 and any one of the following: ANT 137, 208, 234, 282, CRS 242.

To satisfy the requirement of a third (unpaired) course for social science distribution, students may take Sociology 101, Anthropology 105, or Anthropology 107.

Courses In Anthropology

ANT 105. Introduction to Anthropology

The study of human diversity with emphasis on cultural anthropology. Topics include the anthropological perspective, resources of culture, organization of material life, systems of relationships and global forms of inequality. The course examines how anthropologists apply their skills to solve contemporary human social problems. Basic ethnographic interviewing skills. Introduction to ethnography.

ANT 107. Introduction to Environmental Archaeology

Exploration of the variety of past human societies and cultures through archaeology, with an emphasis upon the interplay between environment and culture. The course covers a wide time span, from the biological evolution of hominids and the origins of culture to the development of complex civilizations and the more recent historical past.

ANT 109. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are used in academia, business, and government to manage large datasets of spatially-linked information and to provide users with powerful analytic tools. Classroom discussions introduce the theories and uses of GIS and focus on the organizational issues that impact the implementation of GIS in our society. Laboratory activities teach the student how to extract and present GIS data in graphical form, and how to construct and augment GIS databases using on-the-ground data gathering, map point-plotting equipment, and auxiliary data bases.

ANT 137. Cultures and Environments of the Chesapeake

An examination of prehistoric and historic societies in the Chesapeake Region. Archaeological, historical, and environmental evidence is used to understand cultural development and the relationships between people and their environment. Topics include the arrival of humans in the region, Native American groups, colonial settlement in the Tidewater, and the 19th Century. (Also ENV 237)

ANT 194. Introductory Topics in Anthropology

Topics vary.

ANT 200. Introduction to Language

This course will introduce the student to the study of linguistics. Concepts of both historical and descriptive linguistics are included. Some of the areas of study are: linguistic history and methodology, language origin, language and society, language structure, dialects and language families. The course is open to all students. (Also FLS 200)

ANT 208. Doing Archaeology

An examination of the methods of archaeology and theoretical perspectives. Course topics include research design, site surveys, remote sending technology, excavation techniques, dating methods, the analysis of material culture, and theory building. Students will be involved in exploration and research using the wide variety of resources available in the region, including local excavations, local and regional archives, and museum collections. Prerequisite: Anthropology 107.

ANT 210. Intermediate Geographic Information Systems

This second course in geographic information systems builds upon the theories discussed in Introduction to Geographic Information Systems, and focuses on the more technical aspects of GIS. Laboratory activities teach the student to use more advanced functions of GIS software, and the fundamentals of advanced GIS analysis and display programs. The student will also learn to operate a precision GPS field data collector. Prerequisite: Anthropology 109.

ANT 215. Sex, Gender, and Culture

The study of the biological differences of sex in relationship to the cultural construction of gender. The importance of modes of production and ideology in forming gender concepts for all human societies. Cross-cultural issues of gender identity, roles, relationships, and equality or inequality. Prerequisite: Anthropology 105.

ANT 234. Human Evolution and Biological Anthropology

This course will utilize a holistic approach to explore the evolution of the human species. Students will learn the basics of evolutionary theory, biology, and fossil and archaeological evidence through lectures, discussion, readings, videos and hands-on learning. This course is divided into three main sections titled: (a) how evolution works, (b) the history of the human lineage, and (c) evolution, technology, and modern humans.

ANT 235. Cultures of Latin America

Prehistory of the Americas and survey of indigenous cultures in Latin America today (Mesoamerica, the Andean countries and the Amazonian countries). Introduction to environmental anthropology and applications to environmental issues. Prerequisite: Anthropology 105 or permission of the instructor. Interested students who have a background in history, political science, Spanish or international studies are encouraged to seek the instructors permission.

ANT 280. Traditional Ecological Knowledge

This course introduces students to the anthropological study of indigenous peoples and how they respond to the forces of globalization. Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) refers to the knowledge base acquired by indigenous and local peoples over many hundreds of years through direct contact with the environment. It includes nomenclature, classification, beliefs, rituals, technology, environmental management strategies and worldviews—all of which have helped shape environments for millennia. This course explores these different forms of knowledge and poses a series of questions about their importance and use, such as: How is globalization affecting TEK? Who possesses TEK? Who “owns” TEK? Should the owners of TEK be compensated for their knowledge? Does TEK promote sustainability? Can nation-states utilize TEK? What are the impacts on indigenous groups when TEK is “promoted”? How can traditional knowledge of the natural world be responsibly and ethically collected, studied and applied in modern medicine and global commerce?

ANT 282. Primitive Technology and Experimental Archaeology

Students in this course are exposed to the field of experimental archaeology and gain an appreciation for the valuable contribution it can make to our understanding of the past. Students will explore various primitive technologies utilized throughout prehistory. These technologies were not only crucial to the survival of our ancestors but also played an important role in the development of culture. A holistic, project based learning approach will be utilized during the semester, which includes lectures, discussions, reading, hands-on learning, self-reflection, and group work.

ANT 294. Special Topics in Anthropology

Contents vary. Prerequisite: Anthropology 105 or 107, or permission of instructor.

ANT 296. Archaeological Field School

An introduction to archaeological fieldwork methods and to the theoretical concerns of anthropological archaeology. includes participation in archaeological survey and excavation as well as lectures, readings, and writing assignments. It typically is a six-week summer program, with a minimum obligation of 20 hours per week. Prerequisites: Anthropology 105, Anthropology 107 or History 201; or permission of instructor. May be repeated once for credit.

ANT 305. Doing Anthropology

Introduction to cultural anthropological field methods and the writing of ethnographies. Students practice skills of observation, participation, reflection, mapping, selection of informants, ethnographic interviewing, analysis, proposal writing, and ethnographic writing. Each student researches a cultural scene in the Chesapeake region and writes an ethnography. Prerequisite: Anthropology 105.

ANT 306. Marine Archaeology

Introduction to underwater archaeology. Gives students an overview of the history and methods of the field. In addition to class activities, students will be involved in practical exercises such as mapping and data analysis; field trips, including remote sensing work on the College’s workboat and visits to historic vessels; and outside lectures on marine history and archaeology. A basic understanding of archaeological method and theory is useful for the course. Prerequisite: previous archaeological coursework or permission of instructor.

ANT 308. Reconstructing Past Environments

The study of scientific principles and methods in archaeology, with special emphasis upon earth sciences. Environmental reconstruction and site formation processes will be explored, along with methodologies such as remote sensing, geophysical prospecting, soil science, palynology, floral and faunal analysis, and radiometric dating. Pleistocene and post-Pleistocene geomorphology and environmental change in the Chesapeake will be examined, with field trips to local sites and local research projects. (Also ENV 308.) Prerequisites: Anthropology 208, Environmental Studies 101, or permission of instructor.

ANT 320. Race and Ethnicity

The dangers of using the concept “race.” Focus on the cultural construction of ethnic, racial, and national identities in the contexts of immigration, colonialism, nationalism, and globalization. Symbols of ethnic identity, stereotyping, style, tactics of choice, situational ethnicity. Prerequisite: Anthropology 105.

ANT 355. Myth, Ritual, and Symbolism

Study of theories of culture with a focus on human creativity as it is expressed in myth, ritual, and symbolism. Introduction to the major paradigms of anthropology. Ethnographic fieldwork on a ritual, analysis, and writing a scholarly paper. Prerequisite: Anthropology 105.

ANT 394, 494. Special Topics in Anthropology

Contents vary. Prerequisite: two prior anthropology courses.

ANT 405. Seminar in Anthropology

Discussion of significant contemporary issues in anthropology. Application of anthropology to ethical issues and careers. Familiarity with professional literature and professional style guides. Research design and location and assessment of source materials. Grant writing and research. Exploration of careers and higher studies in anthropology. Required course for anthropology majors and minors. Should be taken in the spring semester of junior year.

ANT 474. Historic Preservation and Cultural Resource Management

Provides a comprehensive overview of historic preservation and cultural resource management as practiced in the United States. Examines the history of the preservation movement, the role of preservation in American culture, and the legislative framework for historic preservation. Reviews the growing field of cultural resource management, looking at issues in architectural design, contract or “salvage” archaeology, and heritage tourism. Prerequisite: 200-level coursework in archaeology or American history, or permission of instructor.

ANT 472. Anthropology of Art

A study of art from anthropological perspectives on creativity, aesthetics, art, and artists. Readings include significant works by anthropologists who have taken unusual and interesting approaches to art, aesthetics, and the artist. Students will apply these new ways of thinking about and studying art to an ethnographic study of the art scene in Chestertown as well as to a larger project involving library research. Visual anthropology techniques will also be taught. Prerequisite: Anthropology 105 or permission of instructor.

ANT 290, ANT 390, ANT 490. Anthropology Internship

The department encourages students with prior courses in anthropology to develop, with a member of the department, internship opportunities. Students interested in pursuing internships should read “Internships And Other Opportunities” in this Catalog. In addition to the requirements listed there, interns should expect to write a paper describing their experiences, as relevant to anthropology, and connected to a reading list to be developed and agreed upon by the intern and the supervising faculty member.

ANT 297, ANT 397, ANT 497. Independent Study

Junior and senior students with a strong interest and background in anthropology may, working with a faculty member in the department, develop either a research project or a course of study in order to pursue a subject or topic within the discipline not a covered by the department’s regular offerings. The student and faculty member will agree upon a reading list, and either a formal research project or a substantial paper. The student should expect to meet regularly with his or her instructor to demonstrate progress in, and knowledge of, the readings; and to discuss, and to receive guidance on the project or paper. (Note that students may not use independent study courses to gain academic credit for work on their Senior Theses).

ANT 295, ANT 395, ANT 495. On-campus Research

ANT 396, ANT 496. Off-campus Research

ANT SCE. Anthropology Senior Capstone Experience

The anthropology senior capstone experience is a significant piece of independent research experience in the form of a thesis or project undertaken by each senior with the guidance and mentorship of a department faculty member. All senior capstone experiences must include anthropological methods and theory. A student who successfully completes the SCE will receive a grade of Pass or Honors, and will be awarded 4 credits. A more extensive description of the SCE is available from the department chair. Discussion of a joint thesis, undertaken by a student with two majors, can be found on page 42 of this Catalog.

Courses In Sociology

SOC 101. Introduction to Sociology

Introduction to basic concepts and theories in sociology concerning the nature of society, culture, and personality. Consideration of social processes, groups, and institutions found in modern American society.

SOC 194. Introductory Topics in Sociology

Contents vary. (No prerequisite.)

SOC 212. Sociology of the Family

Study of the family as a social institution. Comparative family systems, history of the family, and theory and research dealing with courtship, marriage, and disorganization of the modern family. Prerequisite: Sociology 101 (Also Gender Studies 212)

SOC 213. Sociology of Gender

Gender as a social construction. Sex and gender. Effects of gender on individuals’ statuses and opportunity structures. Focus on contemporary American responses to sex and gender. Gender roles and definitions earlier in U.S. history and in other societies. Prerequisite: Sociology 101. (Also Gender Studies 213)

SOC 221. Social Inequalities

The nature of the systems of social stratification and racial inequality as well as the interaction between social class and race in the United States. Personal consequences of the various forms of inequality and perceptions of the legitimacy of social systems based on race are considered. Prerequisite: Sociology 101.

SOC 240. Criminology

Study of the nature, causes, and social significance of crime. Prerequisite: Sociology 101.

SOC 250. City and Suburb

Cities from their origins to the present. Cities are both causes and consequences of social and technical change; therefore they are always places of social problems and conflict. Course will focus on early and industrial cities, and on the newly emerging “edge cities.” Prerequisite: Sociology 101.

SOC 262. Self and Society

Examines reciprocal relationships of society and the individual, and of the nature of face-to-face human interaction. Introduces key concepts, theories, and methodologies of sociological social psychology. Students read, analyze, and perform research that explores the ways in which society affects individuals and groups; how individuals and groups, reciprocally, influence society; how individuals interpret and negotiate the social world; and the influence individuals and groups have on others. Prerequisite: Sociology 101.

SOC 294. Special Topics in Sociology

Contents vary. Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or permission of instructor.

SOC 303. Social Theory

Critical analysis of leading social thinkers from 1800 to the present. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 and two additional courses in sociology, or permission of the department chair.

SOC 306. Research Methods in Sociology

Introduction to the methods used in studying society. Selection of a research topic, experimental design, sampling, methods of data collection, statistical analysis of findings. Prerequisites: Sociology 101, and completion of the statistics requirement (MAT 109 or PSY 209).

SOC 340. Victimology

The concepts and theories surrounding victimization in the U.S. resulting from violent crime and white collar crime form the basis of this course. Students will explore the history and social context of the victims’ movement. They will develop an understanding of how victimization data are collected and will learn about victim services provided nationally as well as on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Discussions of race, gender, and economic class will be woven through the analysis of specific victim categories such as: domestic and family violence; hate crimes; violent street incidents; campus violence; identity fraud; and terror victims. The course will present students with experiential learning opportunities as well as a forum for assessing public policy options that address the legal, financial, medical and emotional needs of crime victims and their families. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 and Sociology 240, or permission of instructor.

SOC 341. Variant Behavior

An exploration of behavior that has been socially defined as “deviant.” The nature, sources, and consequences of this definition will be discussed. Prerequisite: Sociology 101 and one additional course in sociology.

SOC 344. White Collar and Commercial Crime

Exploration of foundational concepts of white-collar criminology using some of the more significant cases of the past 30 years. Emphasis on offenses involving consumer fraud, institutional and political corruption, and crimes likely to increase in frequency and magnitude such as health care fraud, financial transactions offenses, and cyber-crimes. Students examine enforcement patterns and evaluate reforms under legislation such as Sarbanes-Oxley. Prerequisites: Sociology 240.

SOC 345. Transnational and Organized Crime

This course will examine organized crime in the U.S., transnational crimes and international law concepts, and regional crime groups on various continents. Students will use sociological theories of deviance, comparative justice models, and a new vocabulary that applies to transnational crimes throughout the course. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 and Sociology 240, or permission of instructor.

SOC 351. Religion in the United States

The influence of religion on contemporary North American society, and of society on religious form and practice. Particular emphasis on the relationship between one’s place in the class system and religious group membership and participation. Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or prior permission of the instructor.

SOC 356. Complex Organizations

The nature of bureaucratic and other formal organizations and the changing place of the bureaucracy in society. The relationship between bureaucratic structure and individual development. Prerequisite: Sociology 101 and one additional sociology course or permission of the instructor.

SOC 370. Environmental Sociology

This class explores the human dimension of ecosystem science. Use of environmental sociology as a framework for understanding the dynamic relationship between humans and the environment, trends in environmental policy and public opinion, environmentalism as a social movement, human-induced environmental decline, and environmental justice. Students will explore how changes in ecosystems influence the achievability and sustainability of societal values such as security from natural disasters, health, good social relations, and freedom to pursue personal and cultural interests. Prerequisites: SOC 101 and one additional sociology course or permission of the instructor.

SOC 394, 494. Special Topics in Sociology

Contents vary. Prerequisite: two prior sociology courses or permission of instructor.

SOC 413. Work and Gender

This course examines the expectations, opportunities, and rewards as well as the limitations that men and women face in paid and unpaid labor. The historical contexts of work, the intersection of race and gender, the balancing of paid and unpaid labor, and global patterns of work with respect to gender will be studied. Prerequisites: SOC 101 and one additional sociology course or permission of the instructor.

SOC 462. Sociology of the Body

An examination of bodies as a source of power, repression, and subjugation, a medium for expression, and an entity to be controlled. This course investigates how the body is influenced by social forces, the meanings attached to the body and particular body parts, the ways in which we experience our own bodies in contemporary society, and the significance of the body for the discipline of sociology. Includes study of characteristics such as body size, physical ability, race, and sex as well as various forms of elected or forced body modification. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 and an additional course in sociology, or permission of the instructor.

SOC. 470. Armed Forces & Society.

This course focuses on the interactive effects among the military, the state (government), and society (citizens). Components of the course include examination of social change and the growth of military institutions, civil-military relations, the changing functions of the military in (global) society, military service as an occupation versus a profession, the sociology of military life, and the intersection of the military institution with issues of race, gender, and sexual orientation. This course will also explore the relationships of foreign militaries to their host societies in a comparative context with the U.S. Prerequisites: SOC 101 and one additional course in sociology or permission of the instructor.

SOC 290, 390, 490. Sociology Internship

The department encourages students with prior courses in sociology to develop, with a member of the department, internship opportunities. Students interested in pursuing internships should read “Internships and Other opportunities,” in this Catalog. In addition to the requirements listed there, interns should expect to write a paper describing their experiences, as relevant to sociology, and connected to a reading list to be developed and agreed upon by the intern and the supervising faculty member. Prerequisite: Sociology 101.

SOC 295, 395, 495. On-campus Research

SOC 296, 396, 496. Off-campus Research

SOC 297, 397, 497. Independent Study

Junior and senior students with a strong interest and background in sociology may, working with a faculty member in the department, develop either a research project or a course of study in order to pursue a subject or topic within the discipline not a covered by the department’s regular offerings. The student and faculty member will agree upon a reading list, and either a formal research project or a substantial paper. The student should expect to meet regularly with his or her instructor to demonstrate progress in, and knowledge of, the readings; and to discuss, and to receive guidance on the project or paper. (Note that students may not use independent study courses to gain academic credit for work on their Senior Theses.) Prerequisites: Sociology 101 and two additional courses in sociology.

SOC 001-002. Senior Seminar

Seniors will meet for 75 minutes each week in each semester of the senior year for general guidance in the Capstone process, for integration of the undergraduate educational experience, and for guidance in the transition from undergraduate study to employment and to post-BA academic work. Participation in SOC 001 in the fall of senior year and SOC 002 in the spring semester is a requirement of the major.

SOC SCE. Senior Capstone Experience

The Senior Capstone Experience in sociology is a significant piece of independent research, generally in the form of a thesis, undertaken by each senior with the guidance and mentorship of a department faculty member. A successful SCE will demonstrate the student’s ability to answer a significant sociological question using the tools of both sociological theory and methodology. A student who successfully completes the SCE will receive a grade of Pass or Honors, and will earn four credits in her or his final undergraduate semester. A more extensive description of the SCE is available from the department chair. Discussion of a joint thesis, undertaken by a student with two majors, can be found on page 39 of this Catalog.

Courses In Social Welfare

SOC 347. Juvenile Delinquency and Social Welfare

Examines theories of delinquency causation and looks critically at programs that treat delinquents and status offenders, nationally and in Maryland. Students will visit a detention center and Juvenile Court, and talk with experts in the field. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 and at least 2 of the following: Sociology 212, 240, 250, 303, 341, 382; or prior permission of the instructor.

SOC 382. Introduction to Social Welfare

A history of social welfare and the development of social welfare programs. Special attention will be paid to the organization of welfare in the United States. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 and Psychology 112.

SOC 483-484. Field Experience in Social Welfare

A study of the organization and operation of social agencies. Students gain field experience in welfare work under professional supervision. Prerequisites: Sociology 382 and prior permission of the instructor.

Courses Offered in the Washington College Abroad Programs

ANT 105. Introduction to Anthropology (Rhodes University)

Introduction to the wide scope and contemporary relevance of anthropology. Ethnographic examples are drawn from all over the world, but the peoples and problems of southern Africa receive particular attention. Equivalent to ANT 105, above. This course is terms 1 and 2 of Anthropology I at Rhodes University. May not be taken for credit if student has previously taken the Washington College course. Four credits.

SOC 101. Introduction to Sociology (Rhodes University)

Terms 1 and 2 of Rhodes University course “Sociology I.” Term 1 is an introduction to the concepts of sociology; term 2 is a topical survey of sociological issues with particular emphasis on issues facing South Africa. Consult current Rhodes University offerings for descriptions applicable in any particular academic year. May not be taken for credit if student has previously taken the Washington College course. Four credits.

SOC 201. Intermediate Sociology (Rhodes University)

Terms 1 and 2 of Rhodes University course “Sociology II.” Term 1 (referred to as “Paper I [Section A]”) is an introduction to sociological theory, with focus on the major classical theorist. Term 2 (“Paper I [section B]”) focuses on a single topic chosen from areas such as Race and Class, Political Sociology, Family Sociology, Sociology of Language, Mass Communication, Migrant Studies. Consult current Rhodes University offerings for descriptions applicable in any particular academic year. Students may complete either this course or Industrial Sociology (Rhodes University) for credit, but not both. Prerequisite: Sociology 101 and one additional sociology course. Four credits.

SOC 250. Urban Communities (London)

Processes of urban growth and urbanization, comparative urban dynamics, organization of urban communities. Emphasis on urban social policies and problems. Case studies, urban explorations appropriate to the site. (London) Prerequisite: Sociology 101. May be paired with Sociology 101 for Social Science Distribution. Note: three credits.

SOC 259. Industrial Sociology (Rhodes University)

Terms I and II of Rhodes University course “Industrial Sociology II.” Term 1 (referred to as “Paper I [Section A]”): is an introduction to sociological theory, with focus on the major classical theorist, and an overview of theories of industrial society. Term 2 (“Paper I [section B]”): Classical and contemporary theories of trade unions; current debates about the role of the trade union movement. Students may complete either this course or Intermediate Sociology (Rhodes University) for credit, but not both. Prerequisite: Sociology 101 and one additional sociology course. Four credits.

The Graduate Program

The College offers part-time evening programs leading to the Master of Arts in English, History, and Psychology during the fall, spring, and summer sessions. Graduate courses in Reading, for certification only, may be arranged through the Education curriculum. The Master of Arts degree is awarded to students who complete a 30 semester-hour program (10 courses) as specified by the appropriate department. Courses listed below are typical of those offered. For a graduate catalog and further information, write: The Office of Graduate Admissions, Washington College, 300 Washington Avenue, Chestertown, MD 21620.

Master of Arts in English

  • American Fiction Since 1945
  • American Literary Romanticism
  • American Poetry Since 1945
  • Chaucer
  • Eighteenth-Century British Literature
  • Faulkner and Literary Romanticism in U.S.
  • James and Post-Romantic Literature in the U.S.
  • Medieval Literature
  • Modern Drama
  • Poe and Literature of British Colonies of N. American and Early U.S.
  • Poe and Post-Colonialism
  • Postcolonial English Literature
  • Romantic Poetry
  • Seventeenth-Century British Literature
  • Shakespeare
  • Studies in Comic Drama
  • The Nineteenth-Century British Novel
  • Twentieth-Century British and American Poetry
  • Victorian Literature
  • Yeats, Joyce, and Beckett

Master of Arts in History

  • The African American Experience in America
  • American Colonies and the Revolution
  • Ancient Near East and Greece
  • Ancient Rome
  • Jefferson, Jackson, and the Coming of the Civil War
  • Latin America in the Twentieth Century
  • Medieval England
  • Medieval Europe
  • The New Deal and WWII
  • Progressivism and the Twenties
  • The Reconstruction Era and the Gilded Age
  • The Renaissance and the Reformation
  • The Soviet Union Since WWII
  • Topics in American Intellectual History
  • Twentieth-Century Europe
  • Twentieth-Century Germany
  • The U.S. Civil War
  • The U.S. Since WWII

Master of Arts in Psychology

  • Abnormal Behavior
  • Adolescence, Maturity, and Old Age
  • Advanced Counseling
  • Advanced Topics in Experimental Psychology
  • Behavior Modification
  • Biological Foundations of Human Behavior
  • Cognitive and Human Performance
  • Cognitive Psychology
  • The Dynamics of Group Interaction
  • The Exceptional Child
  • Infancy and Childhood
  • Introduction to Counseling
  • Principles of Sensation and Perception
  • Psychological and Educational Testing
  • Psychopharmacology
  • Research Methods and Advanced Statistics
  • Social Psychology
  • Statistics in Psychology and Education
  • Theories of Personality