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Education

NOTE: This page contains information from the 2012-2013 Catalog. It remains available for archival purposes only. For the most current WC Catalog content, please visit http://catalog.washcoll.edu and download this year’s edition.
Division of Social Sciences

 

The Education Department is characterized by a highly nurturing and personalized environment, intellectual rigor, and a performance milieu within a liberal arts context. Education is not a subject major. As the department is a member of the Social Sciences Division, the foundational sequence courses (Principles of Education and Educational Psychology) can fulfill distribution requirements in the social sciences.

The department, recognizing that the world of schooling is a primary socializing agency for the American polity, has the aim of inviting all students to inquire into the nature of education and its relationship to their future lives as citizens, parents, or educators. Through close connections and unhurried conversations with faculty and staff, the department integrates philosophy, theory, and practice in order to prepare students to be the next generation of citizens and leaders. The department aims: a) to provide the professional preparation for certification required by the State Department of Education in Maryland and the 45 states with which Maryland has reciprocal certification agreements; b) to explore the social, psychological, philosophical, and historical foundations of education in our society; and c) to stimulate inquiry concerning the nature of our educational institutions.

The Education Department offers teacher certification programs in Elementary and Secondary Education. Program requirements are in alignment with the Maryland Redesign of Teacher Education and standards of assessment are based on The Maryland Essential Dimensions of Teaching. The College has established eleven Professional Development School partnerships in three local counties in order to implement state requirements that each teacher candidate complete 100 days of an extended internship in a Professional Development School in two consecutive semesters. This includes the student teaching experience.

Entry Requirements

Entry criteria for the Teacher Certification Program are as follows: cumulative GPA of 2.8 (and a GPA of 3.0 in the teaching field for secondary certification); recommendation from a professor in the student’s major field of study; approval of the Education Department Chair following a formal interview with the Chair and departmental colleagues; and a Maryland passing score on one of the following exams: Praxis I-composite score of 527, SAT-composite score of 1100, ACT-composite score of 24, or GRE-composite score of 1000 (if taken before 9/1/2011) and 297 (as of 9/1/2011). Admission to the secondary program generally occurs during the fall semester of the junior year. Admission to the elementary program generally occurs during the spring semester of the junior year. (Where possible, the Department will make accommodations for “late deciders.”). Students should be aware that the Maryland State Department of Education requires a grade of “C” or better in all courses applied toward certification.

It should be noted that Washington College Teacher Certification Program requirements may be modified because of evolving state requirements for approved programs in teacher education.

Program Completion

Students will be recommended for Maryland Approved Program teacher certification when they complete the following: 1) an academic degree with a cumulative GPA of 2.8, and a GPA of 3.0 in their major for secondary certification; 2) successful completion of the Washington College Teacher Certification Program; 3) successful completion of national examinations according to Maryland standards.

I. Elementary Education

The Elementary Certification Program (grades 1-6) is made up of three required components: 1) completion of selected core courses in Humanities, Social Sciences, and Mathematics-Natural Sciences; 2) an academic major, usually in Human Development; 3) a required sequence of Education courses and field experiences. Consultation with the Coordinator of Elementary Education should be held during the first semester of the freshman year to insure proper scheduling and selection of courses.

The required education courses for students who wish to become certified as elementary teachers are listed under the Human Development major.

The Human Development Major

Students selecting the Human Development major will study the individual in community and the world of schooling. The major provides a comprehensive preparation for prospective elementary school teachers, and an interdisciplinary program for students who wish to examine human development in the context of theory and practice in education but who do not wish to seek teacher certification.

The Human Development major is designed to help students answer the question, “How do children develop into fully mature, autonomous and self-aware human beings who are capable of both intimate and public communal relationships?” These studies will facilitate an understanding of the development of children in our multifaceted society within the comprehensive liberal arts foundation of the Washington College experience. The Human Development major provides the opportunity for enlarging our understanding of the development of school-aged youth. This is a particularly appropriate foundation for individuals wishing to become elementary school teachers.

The academic program includes sequenced study in educational foundations (the history, philosophy, and psychology of education), a developmental progression of study in pedagogical theory and practice, a demonstrated knowledge of content in selected liberal arts disciplines, and multi-disciplinary courses from the departments of anthropology, sociology, and psychology.

Field experiences and research are an essential component for the major. The major study for the teacher candidate requires a 100-day internship in a Professional Development School; for the non-teacher candidate, the major study includes field experiences in schools or other educational and social agencies.

Washington College places singular emphasis on the completion of a significant independent project as the culminating activity in a major program. The teacher candidate will develop and present a professional portfolio which includes an action research project; the Maryland Essential Dimensions of Teaching standards will provide guidance and evaluative criteria. The non-teacher major will develop and present an approved interdisciplinary thesis that includes field research.

Course Sequence for Human Development Majors

HD Major - Option 1: Course Sequence for Human Development Majors with Professional courses required for Maryland Approved Program Elementary Certification. Students should be aware that the Maryland State Department of Education requires a grade of “C” or better in all courses applied toward certification.

  • EDU 211-214. Clinical Experiences/practica
  • EDU 301. Principles of Education
  • EDU 302. Educational Psychology
  • EDU 330. Diversity and Inclusion
  • EDU 351. Processes and Acquisition of Reading
  • EDU 352. Reading Instruction and Assessment
  • EDU 354. Literature for Children: K-8
  • EDU 394. Qualitative Inquiry & Action Research, or another approved research design course
  • EDU 411. Curriculum and Instruction: Mathematics and Natural Science
  • EDU 412. Curriculum and Instruction: Language Arts and Social Studies
  • EDU 413. Teaching Internship
  • EDU 414. Teaching Internship
  • EDU SCE. Senior Capstone Experience
  • PSY 202. Lifespan Development

An additional two courses will be selected, in consultation with the advisor, from the following:

Anthropology

  • ANT 200. Introduction to Language (FLS 200.)
  • ANT 215. Sex, Gender, and Culture
  • ANT 305. Doing Anthropology
  • ANT 320. Race and Ethnicity

Psychology

  • PSY 221. Social Psychology
  • PSY 231. Personality
  • PSY 234. Psychopathology II
  • PSY 309. Statistics and Research Design II
  • PSY 316. Cognitive Psychology with Lab
  • PSY 403. Behavior Modification with Lab
  • PSY 433. Child Assessment with Lab

Sociology

  • SOC 212. The Family
  • SOC 213. Gender
  • SOC 221. Social Inequalities
  • SOC 250. City and Suburb
  • SOC 306. Research Methods in Sociology
  • SOC 341. Variant Behavior
  • SOC 351. Religion in the United States

In completing the General Education requirements of the College, certification students will choose from the following list of courses in the distribution sequences:

Freshmen common core courses:

GRW Seminar and ENG 101 (forms of Literature & Composition). Exceptions may be granted through advanced placement or transfer credit. See ‘Requirements for First-Year and Transfer Students’ for more information.

Natural Science - Two Courses

Students will take two courses in the natural sciences. The courses must have a laboratory component, and can be courses for non-majors or majors.

Students may complete any combination of the following courses:

  • BIO 100. Current Topics in Biology
  • BIO 104. Ecology of the Chesapeake Bay
  • CHE 110/ENV 110. Chemistry of the Environment
  • PHY 100. Concepts in Contemporary Physics
  • PHY 110. Astronomy
  • PHY 140/ENV 140. Exploring the Solid Earth
  • PHY 141. Atmosphere, Ocean, and Environment

Preferred two-course sequences are:

  • BIO 111, 112. General Biology I, II
  • CHE 111, 112. General Chemistry I, II
  • PHY 111, 112. General Physics I, II

Students pursuing a minor in a natural science or psychology should take one of the preferred two-course sequences.

Quantitative - Two Courses

Students will take two math courses, one of which must be MAT 221 Communication, Patterns and Invention in Mathematics. Students may choose from MAT 109 Statistics, PSY 209 Statistics and Research Design I (for Psychology minor), BUS 203 Quantitative Methods I (for Business minors), or any other mathematics course.

Humanities (Two-Course Sequence)

Students will fulfill the Humanities requirement by taking any of the following courses:

  • AMS 201/ENG 211, AMS 202/ENG 212. Introduction to American Culture I, II
  • ENG 207, 208. History of English Literature I, II
  • ENG 209, 210. Introduction to American Literature I, II
  • ENG 213, 214. Introduction to African American Literature I, II

Fine Arts - One course in art, drama, music, or dance that will fulfill distribution in the Fine Arts.

Social Science - Three Courses

  • EDU 301. Principles of Education
  • EDU 302. Educational Psychology
  • HIS 201 or 202. History of the U.S.

HD Major - Option 2: Course Sequence for Human Development Majors without Teacher Certification

Required Foundation Courses:

  • EDU 301. Principles of Education (satisfies social sciences distribution)
  • EDU 302. Educational Psychology (satisfies social sciences distribution)
  • EDU SCE Senior Capstone Experience
  • PSY 202. Life-Span Development

Two of the following from two separate disciplines

  • ANT 105. Introduction to Anthropology
  • SOC 101. Introduction to Sociology
  • PSY 111, 112. General Psychology

Research Design Course - One Course

  • SOC 306. Research Methods in Sociology
  • PSY 309. Statistics and Research Design II
  • ANT 305. Doing Anthropology
  • EDU 394. Qualitative Inquiry & Action Research

The choice of research method will influence the choice of the student’s major co-advisor and the nature of the senior capstone research.

Experiential Field Course - Two

Students must complete two one-credit experiential learning components, i.e. EDU 218 and EDU 219. (Clinical Field Experiences) or EDU 494. Special Topics: Individualized Internships/Experiential Learning.

Eight courses (in addition to those listed previously) will be selected from at least two areas as listed. Two of these courses may be at the introductory level; six of these courses must be upper level.

Area 1: Anthropology

  • ANT 200. Introduction to Language (FLS 200.)
  • ANT 215. Sex, Gender, and Culture
  • ANT 305. Doing Anthropology
  • ANT 320. Race and Ethnicity
  • Area 2: Education
  • EDU 311. World Geography
  • EDU 315. Traditional and Modern Grammar
  • EDU 330. Diversity and Inclusion
  • EDU 354. Literature for Children: K-8
  • EDU 490. Seminar in Peer Tutoring
  • Area 3: Psychology
  • PSY 221 Social Psychology
  • PSY 231. Personality
  • PSY 234. Psychopathology II
  • PSY 309. Statistics and Research Design II
  • PSY 316. Cognitive Psychology with Lab
  • PSY 403 Behavior Modification with Lab
  • PSY 433. Child Assessment with Lab
  • Area 4: Sociology
  • SOC 212. The Family
  • SOC 213. Gender
  • SOC 221. Social Inequalities
  • SOC 240. Criminology
  • SOC 250. City and Suburb
  • SOC 306. Research Methods in Sociology
  • SOC 341. Variant Behavior
  • SOC 351. Religion in the United States
  • Substitution of up to two courses is possible with the approval of the advisor.

Senior Capstone Experience

Human Development majors selecting the non-certification route will complete and present a research study.

II. Secondary Education

Washington College has twelve Maryland Approved Secondary Certification Programs (grades 7-12): art, biology, business education, chemistry, English, French, German, mathematics, physics, social studies, Spanish, theatre. The number and specificity of courses required for certification in these subject areas vary, with some fields such as social studies and English having more extensive state requirements. Program Completion and Certification are contingent upon candidates achieving Maryland passing scores on the required national examinations. Students should be aware that the Maryland State Department of Education requires a grade of “C” or better in all courses applied toward certification.

The following education courses are required for students who wish to become certified as secondary teachers:

  • EDU 216, 217. Clinical Field Experience (each 1 credit)
  • EDU 301. Principles of Education
  • EDU 302. Educational Psychology
  • EDU 307. Reading in the Content Field
  • EDU 330. Diversity and Inclusion
  • EDU 401. Principles of Teaching I: Secondary
  • EDU 402. Principles of Teaching II: Secondary
  • EDU 403. Special Methods in the Teaching Area
  • EDU 404. Secondary Teaching Internship
  • EDU 405. Secondary Education Internship (double credit)

EDU 401, 402, 403, and 405 make up the “Education Block” taken in the fall semester of the senior year or the fall semester after graduation.

EDU 307 meets Maryland reading I and II Secondary Requirements (together with 302 & 401).

Students wishing to be certified in English must take EDU 315. Modern and Traditional Grammar and ENG 342. Children’s and Adolescent Literature. They are also encouraged to take FLS 200. Introduction to Language.

It should be noted that students majoring in economics, political science, psychology, sociology, international studies, and American studies may apply for certification in social studies and do their student teaching in social studies. They must plan their programs carefully in order to fulfill all requirements. Social studies certification includes the following core courses: HIS 103, 104 Modern World History; HIS 201, 202 History of the United States; HIS 319 or 320 African-American History; ECN 111 Introduction to Macroeconomics; POL 102 American Government and Politics; and EDU 311 World Geography; an approved upper division course in social science.

Secondary Education Studies Minor requirements:

The Secondary Education Studies Minor requires a minimum of seven courses: EDU 301, EDU 302, EDU 307, EDU 330, a one-credit Secondary Field Experience (EDU 215-217), and two additional courses from the following:

  • EDU 303 Comparative Education 
  • EDU 311 World Geography
  • EDU 315 Traditional and Modern Grammar 
  • EDU 354 Literature for Children: K-8
  • EDU 394 Special Topics: Innovative Leadership
  • EDU 490 Seminar in Peer Tutoring
  • EDU 394 Qualitative Inquiry & Action Research, (or another approved research design course)
  • ANT 200 / FLS 200 Introduction to Language
  • PSY 202 Lifespan Development
  • ENG 342 Children’s and Adolescent Literature
  • SOC 221 Social Inequalities
  • Related courses approved by Department Chair and Coordinator of Secondary Education

Students planning on pursuing teacher certification should note that this minor on its own is not sufficient for certification.  Students who wish to teach are encouraged to consider applying for the Secondary Teacher Certification Program.


Human Development majors are not eligible for a minor in Secondary Education Studies.

Course Descriptions

211-219. Clinical Field Experiences

Field work consists of off-campus supervised experiences. For teacher candidates, four separate one-credit experiences will take place in Professional Development Schools and include experiences with special needs students. Field work opportunities for Human Development majors may also include international teaching experiences or alternative experiences studying related school personnel.

211, 212, 213, 214. Clinical Field Experiences – Elementary

This four-part course consists of off-campus supervised field experiences, including experience with special needs students. For teacher candidates, these will take place in a Professional Development School. (1 credit each)

215. Clinical Field Experience – Alternative

This course is designed for Human Development majors and students in Education Certification programs who participate in the international teaching experience. Students are responsible for planning, implementing, and assessing lessons as well as participating in school community. (2 credits)

216, 217. Clinical Field Experience – Secondary

This two-part course consists of off-campus supervised field experiences, including experiences with special needs students. For teacher candidates, these will take place in a Professional Development School. (1 credit each)

218, 219. Clinical Field Experience – Human Development

This two-part course consists of off-campus supervised field experiences. Field work opportunities may also include alternative experiences studying related educational personnel. (1 credit each)

301. Principles of Education

A general summary of the field of education for prospective teachers. The historical, philosophical, and sociological foundations of education will be surveyed; contemporary education in the United States will be examined.

302. Educational Psychology

A study of (a) aspects of psychology that are generally applicable to education, (b) the aspects of evaluation that are specifically applicable to classroom practices, and (c) the aspects of individual differences and psychological adjustments that are generally relevant to education. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

303. Comparative Education

A study of the educational systems of various nations. Social, political, and economic influences upon educational practice and theory will be considered.

307. Reading in the Content Area

This is a Maryland Approved Reading Course. It is designed to train preservice middle school and high school teachers to develop in their students the literacy skills necessary for learning in all content areas. Cooperative learning and performance assessment will be used extensively. (Additional reading competencies not included in EDU 307 are integrated into EDU 301, EDU 302, EDU 401 and EDU 402 for students in the undergraduate approved program to meet all requirements set by the state Reading Professional Development Committee.)

311. World Geography

The course examines the relationships between the physical environment, population, and culture in the evolution of global regions.

315. Traditional and Modern Grammar

The course reviews traditional grammar and introduces generative/transformational grammar. It promotes confidence and competence in a student’s ability to recognize and manipulate grammatical elements of English. Finally, it prepares teacher certification candidates to incorporate grammar into the English classroom and explore theories about its uses and abuses.

330. Diversity and Inclusion

Students will learn: a) to understand the nature and range of special needs among pupils in today’s public schools; b) to differentiate instruction to meet the special needs of students in our multicultural society; c) to interpret and implement an Individualized Educational Program; and d) to use a range of support services available to students and teachers.

351. Processes and Acquisition of Reading

An investigation of research explaining the relationship between language acquisition and reading development, the interactive nature of the reading process, and the interrelationship of reading and writing. Topics include assessing the stages of literacy development from emergent literacy through fluency in the language arts processes of speaking, listening, reading, and writing and applying corresponding instructional strategies. This is a Maryland-approved reading course. Prerequisite: Education 301 and 302, or permission of the instructor.

352. Reading Instruction and Assessment

Students will demonstrate mastery of instructional strategies used to make educational decisions in a balanced literacy program including developmentally appropriate word recognition and comprehension strategies. Students will evaluate, use, and interpret a variety of assessment techniques and processes, local, state, and national instruments. The co-requisite clinical field experience will require the student to plan, implement, and evaluate developmentally appropriate reading and language arts instruction and evaluation in a Professional Development School classroom. This is a Maryland-approved reading course. Prerequisite: Education 351.

354. Literature for Children: K-8

A study of literary texts by notable American authors with children as the major audience. Emphasis will be placed on the literary elements, evaluation criteria, and value to the reader of each genre. Through the lens of reader response theory, students will explore the variety of materials, from bound literature to electronic media, available to support children’s motivation to become fluent, independent readers and writers. Students will demonstrate their ability to identify, select, and evaluate literature and other materials that meet students’ literacy needs and interests and to communicate such knowledge to parents. This is a Maryland-approved reading course.

394. Qualitative Inquiry and Action Research

This course introduces methods of qualitative inquiry and examines the principles of action research, a form of systematic study used to address challenging issues in the classroom, school, or district. Course topics include forms of qualitative inquiry, problem identification, selection of appropriate research methods, collecting and analyzing data, developing an interpretation, and reporting qualitative research. Students will read and evaluate qualitative studies in education, develop a basic fluency with qualitative research methods, and gain hands-on experience in applying such methods.

401. 402. Principles of Teaching I & II: Secondary

An exploration of the art and science of teaching and a study of curriculum. Course content, teaching methods, planning, instructional technology, as well as observation and performance of varied teaching techniques are combined to prepare prospective teachers for their student teaching. EDU 302 and 401 in combination comprise a Maryland-approved reading course.

403. Special Methods in the Teaching Field

A course concentrating upon the specific teaching field of the student. Examines objectives and the nature and place of the academic discipline in the secondary school, with emphasis placed on methods and materials for teaching that discipline.

404, 405. Secondary Teaching Internship

This two-semester teaching internship requires the teacher candidate to demonstrate increasing proficiency in a Professional Development School (PDS) classroom. Teacher candidates also participate in additional evening seminars. One credit for EDU 404 and double credit for EDU 405. Laboratory fee.

411. Curriculum and Instruction: Mathematics and Natural Science

This course examines the mathematics and science concepts, curriculum, methods and materials used for effective instruction in mathematics and science in the elementary school. The focus will be on the development of strategies for active learning that will help children construct a meaningful understanding of mathematics and science.

412. Curriculum and Instruction: Language Arts and Social Studies

Teachers of social studies should possess the knowledge, capabilities and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of the ten social studies content themes as identified by the National Council for the Social Studies. This course provides the teacher candidate with some of the organizational tools and instructional strategies needed to conduct classroom instruction in social studies and in the language arts, primarily writing.

413. 414. Elementary Teaching Internship

This two-semester internship, which represents the culmination of the professional development of the teacher candidate, requires the teacher candidate to demonstrate increasing responsibility for assessing, planning, and evaluating instructional effectiveness in a Professional Development School classroom. Teacher candidates will also participate in weekly seminars held on campus. 12 credits for EDU 414. Laboratory fee.

190, 290, 390. Internships

490. Writing Center Theory and Pedagogy: A Seminar in Peer Tutoring

This seminar explores current research and theory on the writing process and prepares students for potential work as Peer Consultants in the college Writing Center. Over the semester, students will develop rhetorical knowledge and critical strategies for working with other writers and their texts. To be considered for the seminar, students must submit faculty recommendations and a writing sample and complete an interview with the Director of the Writing Center. Students from all disciplines may apply.

194, 294, 394, 494. Special Topics of Education

Advanced study in a selected area under departmental guidance.

195, 295, 395, 495. On-campus Research

196, 296, 396, 496. Off-campus Research

197, 297, 397, 497. Independent Study

EDU SCE. Human Development Senior Capstone Experience

Human Development majors seeking teacher certification will prepare and publicly present a professional teaching portfolio. The portfolio will include an independent action research project. Human Development majors selecting the non-certification route will complete and present a research study, which will generally be in the form of a thesis.